Video Editing Discussion

24

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  • darkdragondarkdragon A Sad Panda Posts: 1,051Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 12, 2008
    I Simonius wrote:
    well i tried that and I was able to copy the DVD onto my mac but iMovieHD doesn't want to play with it :cry

    looking at the video formats on SM help I see it is thios one that comes off the DVD and that it's not supported:cry [vob MPEG2 PS format (VOB) No}


    You could try downloading a trial version of Adobe Premiere and see if that will recognize it.
    ~ Lisa
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Posts: 21,316Super Moderators moderator
    edited September 12, 2008
    I Simonius wrote:
    I don't have it here at the moment but it says sony Hi8 on the side `i remeber- any use?

    Hi8 is an older analog format and, yes, it will only have S-Video and Composite video output, as well as analog audio. It predates the digital video formats.

    If you want to edit the video on the computer it will have to be digitized. I believe the best format for that is either direct into the computer using an A/D card or using a DV camcorder as a converter and transfer device. At any rate you want a video format on the computer that has discreet frames, not a DVD format. DVD format is a dialect of MPEG 2 and does not use discreet frames. It is a delivery and presentation format.

    Discreet video formats might include AVI and MOV and DV. While DV is both a wrapper and a codec definition, AVI and MOV are simply wrappers and would also require a video codec. I suggest staying with DV.

    If you can borrow a DV camcorder that has video inputs, that's probably the best method. It will have an IEEE-488 connection (firewire) and either allow conversion from the analog source on-the-fly or you might have to record the source video onto DV cassettes first, which might not be a bad idea.

    It's also a good idea to first noise filter the analog video because DV has a fixed data rate and if you don't filter the noise, much of what you record will be noise. I suggest a high-end VCR that has video DNR or Faroudja video noise reduction to do the filtering.

    Once you get the DV files on the computer it should be easy to find a suitable video editor, but it may not already be on your machine.

    Likewise there are many DVD burner software available that can handle DV video as the source.

    Next time, just use a DV camcorder and save yourself a lot of trouble when you want to edit on the computer.
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • I SimoniusI Simonius WeatherSealedPhotographer Posts: 1,034Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 12, 2008
    ziggy53 wrote:
    Hi8 is an older analog format and, yes, it will only have S-Video and Composite video output, as well as analog audio. It predates the digital video formats.

    If you want to edit the video on the computer it will have to be digitized. I believe the best format for that is either direct into the computer using an A/D card or using a DV camcorder as a converter and transfer device. At any rate you want a video format on the computer that has discreet frames, not a DVD format. DVD format is a dialect of MPEG 2 and does not use discreet frames. It is a delivery and presentation format.

    Discreet video formats might include AVI and MOV and DV. While DV is both a wrapper and a codec definition, AVI and MOV are simply wrappers and would also require a video codec. I suggest staying with DV.

    If you can borrow a DV camcorder that has video inputs, that's probably the best method. It will have an IEEE-488 connection (firewire) and either allow conversion from the analog source on-the-fly or you might have to record the source video onto DV cassettes first, which might not be a bad idea.

    It's also a good idea to first noise filter the analog video because DV has a fixed data rate and if you don't filter the noise, much of what you record will be noise. I suggest a high-end VCR that has video DNR or Faroudja video noise reduction to do the filtering.

    Once you get the DV files on the computer it should be easy to find a suitable video editor, but it may not already be on your machine.

    Likewise there are many DVD burner software available that can handle DV video as the source.

    Next time, just use a DV camcorder and save yourself a lot of trouble when you want to edit on the computer.

    so much informationeek7.gif *whimper* - but thanks...just get a DV camcorder.. wish it were as easy as that.. I have had three offered but none are DV, at least I don't think they are .. how can you tell?

    None have firewire that much I do knowmwink.gif
    Veni-Vidi-Snappii
    ...pics..
  • videospotvideospot Beginner grinner Posts: 2Registered Users Beginner grinner
    edited September 13, 2008
    jfriend wrote:
    I just bought a Sony HDR-SR12 HD camera which produces .m2ts files in AVCHD format. I'm looking for something that can natively edit those files (on Windows Vista) and can produce a good HD format that Smugmug can read (Smugmug won't take the .m2ts files out of the camera both because it doesn't handle the codec used in the Sony AVCHD and because it doesn't handle the 5.1 sound).

    I'm looking for basic video editing and format conversion. I'm hoping to spend no more than $150, but would spend more if I had to to get something good. I don't expect I need really advanced features, but I would like to do basic scene editing, chopping, combining, be able to save the resulting video to lots of formats (for Smugmug, you tube, DVD, blue-ray disk, a format that Flash can play, etc...). Since all my video is intially in AVCHD, I'm hoping for something that doesn't have to do a length conversion on the video (with the resulting time delay and disk space consumption) before starting to edit it.

    I had read the Pinnacle was one of the first to support native AVCHD editing so I check out their offerings. From the comments I've read, it looks like their software is horribly unstable and they've had a reputation for that in prior versions. Of course, I have no way of knowing if those issues would happen to me, but it doesn't look good in reading about it.

    So, then I looked at ULEAD and I read about serious performance problems when working on AVCHD video.

    Several of the previous threads had pointed me to Sony Vegas Platinum and I figured that at least I could be confident that it would read Sony AVCHD video. So far, it looks like my best choice.

    I have a very old version of Premiere Elements that I once tried to use for constructing DVD slideshows and I was not impressed with that product back then so I'm not included to look at the current versions.

    Any other thoughts out there? Is Sony Vegas Platinum a good choice?

    I know total video converter (http://www.effectmatrix.com/total-video-converter) can convert m2ts file to any formats file you need.
    And maybe you can also try this tool total video2dvd ( http://www.effectmatrix.com/total_video_to_DVD_Author/index.htm)
  • jfriendjfriend Scripting dude-volunteer Posts: 8,097Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 13, 2008
    videospot wrote:
    I know total video converter (http://www.effectmatrix.com/total-video-converter) can convert m2ts file to any formats file you need.
    And maybe you can also try this tool total video2dvd ( http://www.effectmatrix.com/total_video_to_DVD_Author/index.htm)

    When I look at Total Video Converter web site, it doesn't list m2ts as a supported format. And, I know that many things that say they support m2ts can't handle the Sony variant that my camera produces. Do you have other information or experience that this actually does work with m2ts or with my Sony camera specifically? I'd love to find something that works.
    --John
    HomepagePopular
    JFriend's javascript customizationsSecrets for getting fast answers on Dgrin
    Always include a link to your site when posting a question
  • AndyAndy Bicameral New YorkPosts: 50,153Registered Users Major grins
    edited May 22, 2009
    Seymore wrote:
    I just shot a Quicktime .MOV with the DW's P&S Nikon and need to edit the 243M file down to a manageable size. Are there any free vid editors out there that can dice a vid? I only need about the first 2-3 mins.

    Oh, almost forgot to mention... Running W2k.

    Thanks...
    (didn't find anything about this in a DGRIN search)


    UPDATE: Found MediaCoder v0.7.0.4399... works great! :ivar

    No clue if it works on your ancient operating system, but folks are happy with MPEG Stramclip: http://www.smugmug.com/help/video-sharing
  • ian408ian408 More wag. Less Bark. Posts: 21,317Administrators moderator
    edited May 22, 2009
    Seymore wrote:
    Are there any free vid editors out there that can dice a vid? I only need about the first 2-3 mins.

    There's also the freebie add on from Microsoft.
    Moderator Journeys/Sports/Big Picture :: Need some help with dgrin?
  • Marc MuenchMarc Muench Artist in Residence Posts: 1,420Registered Users Major grins
    edited May 22, 2009
    Andy wrote:
    No clue if it works on your ancient operating system, but folks are happy with MPEG Stramclip: http://www.smugmug.com/help/video-sharing

    MPEG Streamclip "ROCKS"

    Andy suggested this to me awhile ago and I have been using it since. Since it is free you may want to give it a whirlthumb.gif
  • SamirDSamirD Huntsville Car Scene.com Posts: 3,473Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 1, 2009
    I found another great basic editor and converter that required no installation and no plugins:
    http://www.winpenpack.com/main/download.php?view.734

    I was able to export to avi with xvid video codec, and mp3 audio codec and SM liked it. clap.gif It reduced a 60mb file to around 15mb, which is about right for MPEG1/2 coversions. It was fast too. And it can be even faster when you can edit right in the application.
    Pictures and Videos of the Huntsville Car Scene: www.huntsvillecarscene.com
    Want faster uploading? Vote for FTP!
  • suchitsuchit SuchitNanda Posts: 23Registered Users Big grins
    edited November 3, 2009
    ziggy53 wrote:
    Hi8 is an older analog format and, yes, it will only have S-Video and Composite video output, as well as analog audio. It predates the digital video formats.
    Just wondering could he not just plug the Hi8 into a D8 player? Then use the FireWire to pick the content as .AVI? I have a D8 and I use it with D8 (but I know it can take Hi8 tapes too as Hi8). So once you have the .AVI you can convert it or do what you like and export it to H.264 with AAC and that works well with SmugMug.
    ~ Suchit Nanda
    http://photos.suchit.in/ http://suchitnanda.org/
    Transforming light into expressions of emotions.
  • SamirDSamirD Huntsville Car Scene.com Posts: 3,473Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 3, 2009
    suchit wrote:
    Just wondering could he not just plug the Hi8 into a D8 player? Then use the FireWire to pick the content as .AVI? I have a D8 and I use it with D8 (but I know it can take Hi8 tapes too as Hi8). So once you have the .AVI you can convert it or do what you like and export it to H.264 with AAC and that works well with SmugMug.
    The d8 players work as both analog and digital systems. They provide analog output for those formats and digital for those. I don't think they can do any internal conversion.
    Pictures and Videos of the Huntsville Car Scene: www.huntsvillecarscene.com
    Want faster uploading? Vote for FTP!
  • PilotBradPilotBrad Major grins Posts: 339Registered Users Major grins
    edited April 28, 2010
    Video editing software for Windows? (7D vids)
    Lately I've been taking more and more video with my 7D, and I need to find a software package to piece together my cinematographic masterpieces. mwink.gif

    I'm strictly an amateur, and would like something that is easy to use, but produces high quality videos. I don't much care for all these fancy special effects, and I have no desire to produce DVDs, but I do want the ability to do simple transitions, and fading titles and credits.

    I've downloaded trial copies of Vegas Movie Studio HD, Pinnacle Studio HD and Cyberlink's PowerDirector 8, and after a few initial tests my results are mixed.

    I've found that Pinnacle Studio HD is the easiest to use, but I have been unimpressed with the output quality when compared to the other two.

    Cyberlink's PowerDirector was fairly simple to use, and it's output quality seemed slightly better than Pinnacle Studio HD's, but still not as good as that of Sony Vegas Studio. I also found that I was having a hard time modifying the behaviors of the transitions, but it might simply be that I don't know how to do it.

    Sony Vegas Studio HD clearly produced the best quality output (see below), but I found its interface and dialogs very confusing and I am not sure I have the time to devote to learning it. With the other two apps I was able to add titles and transitions simply by trial and error, but with Vegas Studio I couldn't figure it out on my own.

    Pinnacle and PowerDirector were very easy to use and are solidly in the consumer camp, while Vegas is a few steps ahead with regards to its capabilities, but is perhaps too complex for my needs.

    Can any recommend anything in between?

    A question about quality...
    I was quite surprised to see a differnece in output quality between Pinnacle/PowerDirector and Vegas Studio even though similar output paratmeters were chosen. For example, I output videos from each in WMV format at 720p 30fps (for streaming to my xBox) using the same video bit-rate. In addition, both PowerDirector and Vegas Studio both tell me they are unsing the Windows Media 9 encoder. The videos from Pinnacle and PowerDirector were dark, while the video from Vegas seemed to be of a higher quality with better contrast even though I applied no image/color corrections to it. Perhaps it's simply a lack of my understanding of the software and process, but if they are using the same or similar encoders how is this the case?

    PS - I am going to give Corel's VideoStudio Pro X3 a try next.
  • PilotBradPilotBrad Major grins Posts: 339Registered Users Major grins
    edited April 28, 2010
    Here are some examples of the quality differences...

    This was produced from CyberLink's PowerDirector 8. I brightened the scenes a little but they still aren't as bright as the video from Vegas Studio.


    From Sony Vegas Studio HD. No alterations, only spliced and output.


    Now that I've figured out how to view these both at the same time, I think I am reversing my opinions somewhat. I still think the Vegas Studio video is higher quality (when the orginal 720p file is viewed on my monitor), but the colors are better in the video from PowerDirector 8.
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Posts: 21,316Super Moderators moderator
    edited April 28, 2010
    While Sony Vegas is totally unlike other video editors' user interface, it can be extremely useful and fast once you learn the interface.

    I recommend you at least review a few introductory tutorials to give you the basics. While the following are related to Vegas Pro 8, I think the interface is similar enough that you should gain some insight into your product.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sRD-DrWy1Ac&feature=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwS1lCudxwM&feature=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQniBJiu_kU&feature=related
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • PilotBradPilotBrad Major grins Posts: 339Registered Users Major grins
    edited April 29, 2010
    Thanks Ziggy, there is some great info there, but I am still not sold on Vegas. It's powerful, but some of its dialogs and option boxes are IMHO not user friendly at all. In the short-term I think simple is better for me.

    I've been playing with these video editors and learning a lot. My first thoughts were that I wanted an editing package that would handle the native 7D files, but after doing a bit of research, I'm not so sure editing these compressed files is such a good idea.

    Yes I know, I want it both ways... simple and high-quality. :D

    I found that Vegas Studio, Pinnacle Studio HD and PowerDirector 8 all handled the native 7D files with relative ease, but Corel's VideoStudio Pro X3 crashed frequently. This was disappointing because I felt that Corel's software was potentially what I was looking for; more powerful and polished than Pinnacle or PowerDirector, but more user-friendly than Vegas.

    I the installed MPEG Streamclip and converted the native 7D MOV files to MP4 (100% quality), which Corel was able to handle without issue and which produced some really fantastic high-quality results.

    The conumdrum I face now is whether or not it is important for me to be able to edit the native files, or if I am willing to accept the added step of converting to a more edit-friendly format. Tradeoffs!

    Some links I found interesting and useful...
    http://vimeo.com/forums/topic:23548
    http://buildyourown.wordpress.com/2010/04/15/how-to-transcode-mov-files/
    http://cpn.canon-europe.com/content/education/technical/frame_rate_conversion.do
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Posts: 21,316Super Moderators moderator
    edited May 12, 2010
    I just installed Corel's VideoStudio Pro X3 (VSP X3) yesterday and I'm just starting to play with it. I was resisting even looking at it because I thought I needed more functionality, but the more I look at it the more it would suit many video projects. (This was formerly a ULead product and I liked both it and the more advanced MediaStudio Pro in the past.)

    This software is for Windows 7, Windows Vista or Windows XP with latest service packs.

    VSP X3 has the ability to load 1 - primary video track and then up to 6 additional "overlay" tracks. The overlay tracks can be used for video PIP or similar but it looks like they can also be used in a multi-camera shoot as well.

    Normal video with audio can be split, putting the audio onto the Voice Track. This can be useful in correcting or adjusting the audio using filters. * (See note.)

    Transitions are easily created on a single track by sliding one video segment onto another, creating an automatic transition. Once created the transition may be adjusted or replaced at will.

    Trimming video and audio seems very simple and logical and there is a multi-trim tool that allows a single stream to be chopped into usable segments.

    The inclusion of SmartSound technology (they call it "Auto Music") is extremely welcome allowing the rapid composition of custom length music for intros, exits, audio transitions and audio stingers. (This feature alone is probably worth the price of the package.)

    Most importantly, the Canon 5D MKII MOV files are supported implicitly. Import and export video are well supported with an uncommon abundance of file types, codecs/compression and wrappers.

    Altogether this is very impressive stuff for short format video and at a very reasonable price. ($60USD full version.) Long format video is probably better left for more advanced software, but I may try a bit of it if I purchase the software.


    * (Note: I found a bug in this audio splitting process. If you do much audio filtering you are much better off to split the audio from the video, delete the video track, saving the audio as a WAV file. Then create a new project and reintroduce the video/audio, split the video and audio again but this time delete the original audio track and load in the new WAV file with the filtered/corrected audio. If you try to just split the audio and video and work on the audio track with filters, the bug is that the audio track can pick up a new time-base, resulting in audio instability. Specifically, if the video is standard 29.97fps and you apply audio filters to the split audio track, the audio can become 30fps. At least that happened to me.

    To be fair, I was using 2 different audio filters, from different manufacturers, so I was not totally surprised that there were problems. The work-a-round I applied was fast and worked properly.)
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • PilotBradPilotBrad Major grins Posts: 339Registered Users Major grins
    edited May 12, 2010
    Ziggy, what OS are you using? I ask because I'm intrigued that you seem to be able to edit 5D MKII files without issue, while the app crashes if I attempt editing my 7D files. I'm on Win7 64-bit.

    On a related note, I've been looking at Vegas again. I found this training DVD which might provide me the knowledge to start using Vegas Studio. For $50 it might be worth a shot.
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Posts: 21,316Super Moderators moderator
    edited May 12, 2010
    I have Windows 7 Home Premium, 64 bit, Version 6.1, Build 7600.

    Corel software is also typically sensitive to the video card and driver.

    I have an nVIDIA GeForce 9500 GT video card with driver version 8.17.11.9621 and 1GB RAM.
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Posts: 21,316Super Moderators moderator
    edited May 12, 2010
    You might try downloading and installing a "codec pack" like "Windows 7 Codec Pack":

    http://download.cnet.com/Windows-7-Codec-Pack/3000-13632_4-10965840.html

    I also have Quicktime version 7.66.71.0, 32 bit installed.

    I have ffdshow installed.

    http://sourceforge.net/projects/ffdshow/

    I have DirectX 11 installed.
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • PilotBradPilotBrad Major grins Posts: 339Registered Users Major grins
    edited May 12, 2010
    Thanks Ziggy... I'll give the codecs a shot.

    I guess you're the lucky one... Win Movie Maker AND now Corel work for you, but not me. Maybe I should fix all this by upgrading to a 5DMKII. :D

    BTW, I've been trolling the Corel forums, and it seems like any time someone hit issues with MOV files, the recommendation is to covert to another format.
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Posts: 21,316Super Moderators moderator
    edited May 12, 2010
    PilotBrad wrote: »
    ... BTW, I've been trolling the Corel forums, and it seems like any time someone hit issues with MOV files, the recommendation is to covert to another format.

    Converting the video is always an option. It does tend to lead to faster degradation of the video through re-compression.

    You might want to get the utility freeware, "GSpot". Although it's an unusual (potentially unfortunate) name for a video utility, its purpose it to identify the codecs that a video file "expects" from the computer, and it helps to identify missing and broken codecs (both audio and video).

    Basically, you install GSpot onto your computer, run the software and drag a video file onto the GSpot window. The software reviews the video file and many times it will correctly tell you what codecs the video file needs to run and, more importantly, whether your machine has working codecs to support the video file.

    http://www.headbands.com/gspot/

    If you should need to convert the file first, I used to recommend "Super" freeware for video conversion, but I have not gotten that to run on Windows 7 yet.

    I found another freeware title, "WinFF" which does run on Windows 7 for me and it has a simpler user interface as well. I haven't used it for anything critical yet, so I don't know how conversion quality compares at default settings but initial video impression is that the quality is pretty good at least. (It's just a front for FFMPEG so you should be able to get the same ultimate quality from it that FFMPEG can produce.)

    http://winff.org/html_new/
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • PilotBradPilotBrad Major grins Posts: 339Registered Users Major grins
    edited May 12, 2010
    ziggy53 wrote: »
    Converting the video is always an option. It does tend to lead to faster degradation of the video through re-compression.
    I thought it was the other way around... that the native video files from the 7D or 5DII should be converted to a format more suitable for editing. Have you checked out the link from Canon I posted above?

    I am familiar with GSpot (the software), and I've been using MPEG Streamclip on Win7 without any issues. I find it much easier to use than Super, which I've played with in the past.
    http://www.squared5.com/

    I had tried to convert the files (to uncompressed MOV) using MPEG Streamclip and the Avid DNxHD codec, but Corel VS crashed using those files as well. In the end I converted to MP4 and it worked fine.

    On a related note, I was able to get Window Live Movie Maker to recognize the native 7D MOV files by installing the K-Lite Codec pack. This is great because there is nothing easier than WLMM for producing quick and simple videos to be streamed to the XBox.

    I'll experiment with the other codecs above and see if they help with Corel.
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Posts: 21,316Super Moderators moderator
    edited May 13, 2010
    The Canon linked article is mostly correct but a little misleading. Like the author of the article, Philip Bloom, I too am disappointed to see camera manufacturers using such compressive and relatively edit unfriendly codecs for video capture. Unfortunately, the last consumer codec that had discrete video frames (a video stream that did not use either inter-frame dependence and/or inter-frame compression) was the "DV" format which did use lossy compression per frame to achieve a constant (standard) bit rate, but it maintained discrete video frames. (Some modern digicams also use M-JPEG codecs, which are discrete frames, but they use such high compression rates that they are not considered usable for quality video.)

    Unfortunately MP4 is (generally using) another inter-frame compressor and will lead to transcoding/re-compression artifacts.

    The article mentions the ProRes codec which is a more video edit friendly format, but not PC/Windows friendly. I am not aware of a Windows friendly, lossless codec for Windows at 1080 resolution, but for SD resolution you can use HuffYUV.

    Any modern video editor software that can handle the Canon MOV files has an internal decoder/encoder that writes temporary files to allow frame accurate editing and transitions. As long as the software correctly reads and translates the video file, you don't need another video format which will only degrade video quality through additional re-compression (although I agree that it may be necessary if nothing else works).
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Posts: 21,316Super Moderators moderator
    edited May 13, 2010
    It looks like the Lagarith codec can handle 1080P if you want a lossless compressor for Windows applications. The resulting file sizes will be enormous, but with minimum loss in visual quality.

    I haven't tested it yet, but others are showing promising results.
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • PilotBradPilotBrad Major grins Posts: 339Registered Users Major grins
    edited May 13, 2010
    Great info Ziggy, thanks! I'll continue to experiment.

    I've also had success with Corel by converting the files to AVI (can't remember the codec I picked), but the files grow by 10X and they put a bit of hurt on my PC.

    I'll have to experiment more, but one thing about Corel VS that I haven't been too happy with is it's abilty to render out the 7D's 60fps video at 50% speed (30fps). When I did this with Vegas Studio I got very silky smooth slow-mo, but with Corel the video has an ugly and annoying flicker or choppiness to it. As you have pointed out, I could be loosing something in the process of converting for Corel.
  • NetgardenNetgarden Beachbum Linda Posts: 829Registered Users Major grins
    edited May 17, 2010
    Thanks so much for all this information.
    I am now having time to experiment with some videos I took with my 7D this year, and with my newer W7 Dell XPS, .MOV files were a pain, I couldnt figure out the codec problem, read soemthing about downloading Quicktime editing/source online software and it includes the codec. [havn't done it yet, but MovieMaker on W7 just doesn't work for the 7D movie files.]

    I appreciate your work on this, and you have totally answered the questions I came to type today! ;~)thumb.gif

    Started videoing Raptor nests and although some are too light, I need to do some color editing, sizing and hopefully some improvement of byte size.
    I'm liking it enough to do more of it, but the added file conversions was not appealing.

    And thanks Ziggy for the codec links!bowdown.gif Looking promising after all!
  • DogdotsDogdots Major grins Posts: 8,777Registered Users Major grins
    edited August 12, 2010
    Video Editing Software
    I've been using my point and shoot camera to video tape our new puppy. Only problem is....I want to get some photos from it and don't know what software program I need to do so. If I remember correctly my Photoshop Elements 4 did it, but I could be wrong.

    I would download my Elements 4 and try it, but I can't find it headscratch.gif

    Any help would be greatly appreciated :D
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Posts: 21,316Super Moderators moderator
    edited August 12, 2010
    What operating system is on your computer and what video format does your camera record?

    Alternately which camera (if you don't know the video type)?
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • DogdotsDogdots Major grins Posts: 8,777Registered Users Major grins
    edited August 13, 2010
    ziggy53 wrote: »
    What operating system is on your computer and what video format does your camera record?

    Alternately which camera (if you don't know the video type)?

    Hi Ziggy --

    I'm on Vista -- and my camera is a Canon Powershot A610. Wish I could tell you what video type it is. I've not a clue.
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Posts: 21,316Super Moderators moderator
    edited August 13, 2010
    All I could find on the Canon Powershot A610 is that it saves AVI files and appears to be some dialect of motion JPG compressor. Maximum resolution is 640 x 480.

    I found a fairly nice frame grabber to image file utility in freeware that claims to be Win XP and Vista compatible. I tested it in Windows 7 and it does not play nicely, but I have a Windows 2000 running in a virtual box on the same machine and the utility is fine in that environment. Since it's freeware I suggest that you try it to see if it works for you.

    It's called "ImageGrab" and it's available at:

    http://paul.glagla.free.fr/imagegrab_en.htm

    A very useful mini-tutorial at:

    http://paul.glagla.free.fr/imagegrab_en.htm#filmerit1

    It comes as a "zip" file that you just unzip to a folder and run from that folder. There is no installation that I detect.

    Once you run the software, you load in your video file, move to a frame you want to extract, and then just press a single button to save the video frame to a BMP files (Into the "My Pictures" folder of the Win 2000 machine). Altogether very handy for a freeware application.
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
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