Monochromatic winter skyline, part 2.

MolsondogMolsondog Fetch!Registered Users Posts: 159 Major grins
edited January 23, 2004 in Finishing School
monochromatic

Comments

  • patch29patch29 C|34N3R Atlanta, GARegistered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 2,928 Major grins
    edited January 18, 2004
    Molsondog, I merged your threads. If you use the reply button at the bottom of the first post it will allow you to attach another image in the same post, that way people can compare the two images.


    If you shot it in the AM (sunrise) would that add sunlight back into those shadows?

    If you want to play around in Photoshop you could try to add some color back into the sky.
  • fishfish Site Megalodon Registered Users Posts: 2,950 Major grins
    edited January 18, 2004
    You could add some clouds (oh my...what a hack rolleyes1.gif)
    "Consulting the rules of composition before taking a photograph, is like consulting the laws of gravity before going for a walk." - Edward Weston
    "The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over."-Hunter S.Thompson
  • pathfinderpathfinder Drive By Digital Shooter western IndianaSuper Moderators Posts: 14,632 moderator
    edited January 20, 2004
    fish wrote:
    You could add some clouds (oh my...what a hack rolleyes1.gif)
    Or better yet - you could replace the sky with a nice one with cumulous clouds - Just select the sky with a color selection tool - like the magic wand - and paint in a new sky from another picture with the clone tool...
    Pathfinder - www.pathfinder.smugmug.com

    Moderator of the Technique Forum and Finishing School on Dgrin
  • TuesdayTuesday Beginner Grinner Registered Users Posts: 52 Big grins
    edited January 20, 2004
    Like this one
    I used the clone tool and cloned a sky from another picture.
    :tuesday
    skyline.jpg
  • DoctorItDoctorIt vrooom! Administrators Posts: 11,950 moderator
    edited January 20, 2004
    Tuesday wrote:
    Like this one
    I used the clone tool and cloned a sky from another picture.
    :tuesday
    clouds like that would leave shadows on the ground, no?

    but I can sympathize, I've also been experiencing "boredom" from the white out that is the dead of winter. Everything that isn't snow covered is salt or dirt covered. hooray.
    Erik
    moderator of: The Flea Market [ guidelines ]

  • pathfinderpathfinder Drive By Digital Shooter western IndianaSuper Moderators Posts: 14,632 moderator
    edited January 20, 2004
    DoctorIt wrote:
    clouds like that would leave shadows on the ground, no?

    but I can sympathize, I've also been experiencing "boredom" from the white out that is the dead of winter. Everything that isn't snow covered is salt or dirt covered. hooray.
    Good job Tuesday - you have the sunlight coming from the left in the clouds and hitting the buildings and casting shodows to the right also - so that looks pretty good to me - might ease the contrast betweent hesky and the foreground slightly, but I think that is animprovement to the original plain blue sky. Any one l\else agree? or disagree?

    Pathfinder
    Pathfinder - www.pathfinder.smugmug.com

    Moderator of the Technique Forum and Finishing School on Dgrin
  • cletuscletus Master of Craposition Registered Users Posts: 1,930 Major grins
    edited January 22, 2004
    Here is what I came up with.

    2088892-M.jpg

    If you like it, let me know and I'll tell you what I did!

    -Eric
  • cletuscletus Master of Craposition Registered Users Posts: 1,930 Major grins
    edited January 23, 2004
    I'm using the full version of Photoshop, but if you're using Elements I would imagine it can do this as well.

    Take a look at your image and find three points: 1) A point that should be pure white (or almost pure white) 2) A point that should be compeltely black 3) A point that should be a middle gray

    Here are the points I picked:
    2097476-M.jpg

    Either add a Curves Adjustment Layer, or apply a Curves Adjustment (from the image menu). In the Curves dialog box there are three eyedropper icons. One for black, one for gray, one for white. Click on the black point eyedropper tool, and click on the point in your image you wanted to be balck. Use the middle gray eyedropper and click on the point you wanted middle gray. Use the white eyedropper and click on the point you wanted white.

    After this you can look at each channel of the curves adjustment and play around with them if needed.

    Hope this helps!
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