The most boring photo subjects ever...crit needed

Bend The LightBend The Light Bend The LightPosts: 1,887Registered Users Major grins
edited April 2, 2012 in Technique
Hi all,

I have just today moved into a studio I am sharing with 2 mates. We aim to spend some time studying and practicing before getting some paying clients. But, as I am an impatient sort of chap, I wanted to check out the set up I put up. But there was just me...so i first took a picture of the coat stand with my bag on it, then took a photo of myself.

I would like crit on the light, the background (think I see a little not-quite-white - do you?). Is there spill? Is the colour ok?

please don't crit the models...one is a right bag, and the other is an ugly bu**er! :)

6881104418_f9a50fe585_o.jpg
test 1 by http://bendthelight.me.uk, on Flickr

6881104162_bb245bd943_o.jpg
Me - test by http://bendthelight.me.uk, on Flickr

Cheers

Comments

  • Moving PicturesMoving Pictures Bokeh, Dano Posts: 384Registered Users Major grins
    edited March 29, 2012
    Work it, baby?
    Newspaper photogs specialize in drive-by shootings.
    Forum for Canadian shooters: www.canphoto.net
  • NikolaiNikolai Darth SLR Posts: 19,316Registered Users Major grins
    edited March 29, 2012
    To check if the is a non-white on the bg I don't recommend to rely on your eyes, but instead use any of the ACR/PS provided tools to either enhace contrast dramatically by applying some insanely steep curve, or go nuts with the levels or simply select color with 255, 255, 255 and the decrese the selected area so you will be able to see the non-pure-white zones.

    The bag shot looks OK.
    The SP feels like there is some spillage. Can be fixed by adjusting black point, but it all depends on the intentions...

    HTH
    "May the f/stop be with you!"
    Star*Explorer: on Dgrin, home; Master Class: open;
    Class is in session, My Facebook, @DarthSLR, #NiksTips
    member: NAPP, PPA, partner: Adobe
    Comprehending life, universe and everything - one pixel at a time
  • Bend The LightBend The Light Bend The Light Posts: 1,887Registered Users Major grins
    edited March 29, 2012
    Work it, baby?

    erm...ok.
    Nikolai wrote: »
    To check if the is a non-white on the bg I don't recommend to rely on your eyes, but instead use any of the ACR/PS provided tools to either enhace contrast dramatically by applying some insanely steep curve, or go nuts with the levels or simply select color with 255, 255, 255 and the decrese the selected area so you will be able to see the non-pure-white zones.

    The bag shot looks OK.
    The SP feels like there is some spillage. Can be fixed by adjusting black point, but it all depends on the intentions...

    HTH

    Yes, it helps. The self portrait (and I must say that I was simply messing around with a spare five minutes because I just wanted to shoot something in my new studio...shoot anything!) was straight out of camera, with only sharpening as it was shot RAW. I could do a fair bit of PP to correct contrast etc.

    In Photoshop I used the INFO tab to see the RGB values as I moved around the picture. I found spots where they were less than 255, but couldn't work out how to switch to the white sampler in, say, levels to make that spot 255,255,255. I'll look again...I know my eye is not quite good enough to spot it. :)

    Thanks
  • Moving PicturesMoving Pictures Bokeh, Dano Posts: 384Registered Users Major grins
    edited March 29, 2012
    erm...ok.

    Hey, it struck me as funny at the time. The comment was directed at the backpack.
    Newspaper photogs specialize in drive-by shootings.
    Forum for Canadian shooters: www.canphoto.net
  • Bend The LightBend The Light Bend The Light Posts: 1,887Registered Users Major grins
    edited March 29, 2012
    Hey, it struck me as funny at the time. The comment was directed at the backpack.

    Ah, ok. The backpack says "erm...ok". rolleyes1.gif
  • NikolaiNikolai Darth SLR Posts: 19,316Registered Users Major grins
    edited March 29, 2012
    In Photoshop I used the INFO tab to see the RGB values as I moved around the picture. I found spots where they were less than 255, but couldn't work out how to switch to the white sampler in, say, levels to make that spot 255,255,255. I'll look again...I know my eye is not quite good enough to spot it. :)

    Thanks

    Using INFO tab is better than using the eyes, but you can easily miss a whole lot of random pixels and small areas. The approach I suggested would make such stuff obvious.

    BTW, you can do it in camera, although not as reliably. Shoot BG only. Your histogram should be a flat horizontal line at zero level everywhere except the rightmost end where there should be a single vertical line. Due to the limited accuracy of the small histogram, it not a 100% reliable, but it would alert you if there are obvious flaws...
    "May the f/stop be with you!"
    Star*Explorer: on Dgrin, home; Master Class: open;
    Class is in session, My Facebook, @DarthSLR, #NiksTips
    member: NAPP, PPA, partner: Adobe
    Comprehending life, universe and everything - one pixel at a time
  • Bend The LightBend The Light Bend The Light Posts: 1,887Registered Users Major grins
    edited March 30, 2012
    Nikolai wrote: »
    Using INFO tab is better than using the eyes, but you can easily miss a whole lot of random pixels and small areas. The approach I suggested would make such stuff obvious.

    BTW, you can do it in camera, although not as reliably. Shoot BG only. Your histogram should be a flat horizontal line at zero level everywhere except the rightmost end where there should be a single vertical line. Due to the limited accuracy of the small histogram, it not a 100% reliable, but it would alert you if there are obvious flaws...

    Thanks. I re-read what you wrote above. Will try that method. :)

    I use the histogram in camera. I also have highlights showing (as the "blinkies") in the preview which shows areas where it's not quite blown. Cheers
  • Bend The LightBend The Light Bend The Light Posts: 1,887Registered Users Major grins
    edited March 30, 2012
    Went back to the studio last night (before reading the crit here), a slight change of set up, and a better model than me. Any improvement here?

    6881733942_6397f16a52_o.jpg
    29-3-2012 Tim at Studio v2 by http://bendthelight.me.uk, on Flickr

    Thanks.
  • NikolaiNikolai Darth SLR Posts: 19,316Registered Users Major grins
    edited March 30, 2012
    If you take it into PS and play with the black point you'll see the BG is not a pure white, not enough at least....
    "May the f/stop be with you!"
    Star*Explorer: on Dgrin, home; Master Class: open;
    Class is in session, My Facebook, @DarthSLR, #NiksTips
    member: NAPP, PPA, partner: Adobe
    Comprehending life, universe and everything - one pixel at a time
  • Bend The LightBend The Light Bend The Light Posts: 1,887Registered Users Major grins
    edited March 30, 2012
    Nikolai wrote: »
    If you take it into PS and play with the black point you'll see the BG is not a pure white, not enough at least....

    Yes, I see it...I see it without PS...

    Cheers
  • Rob PauzaRob Pauza Grin Ninja Posts: 118Registered Users Major grins
    edited April 1, 2012
    Just be careful not to crank up the background light too much or you'll see spill and/or chromatic aberrations around the subject.
    -Rob Pauza
    Rob Pauza Photography
  • Bend The LightBend The Light Bend The Light Posts: 1,887Registered Users Major grins
    edited April 2, 2012
    Rob Pauza wrote: »
    Just be careful not to crank up the background light too much or you'll see spill and/or chromatic aberrations around the subject.

    Thanks...yes I have been told, 1 stop above main at most to blow without spill.

    Cheers.
  • NikolaiNikolai Darth SLR Posts: 19,316Registered Users Major grins
    edited April 2, 2012
    Rob Pauza wrote: »
    Just be careful not to crank up the background light too much or you'll see spill and/or chromatic aberrations around the subject.

    Unless you actually spill the lights on the subject (from the light sources) or have a highly reflective surface it is not going to happen. For a basic white fabric BG with regular relective properties you can "overblow" by 3-4 stops without any noticeable effects on the subject. Not that I recommend it (why waste power and increase the recycle times), but you typically have a lot of lenience in that department.
    "May the f/stop be with you!"
    Star*Explorer: on Dgrin, home; Master Class: open;
    Class is in session, My Facebook, @DarthSLR, #NiksTips
    member: NAPP, PPA, partner: Adobe
    Comprehending life, universe and everything - one pixel at a time
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