D7000 AF-C Runnders

TuxsterTuxster Big grinsPosts: 16Registered Users Big grins
edited June 2, 2012 in Cameras
Hi,
I get amazing results with my D7000 when shooting stills or slow moving objects. BUT when I was out photographing some runners this weekend I had mostly blurry results.

My settings were f//5.6, iso 100, and shutter greater than 1/500 almost all the time.
Focus was to AF-c, 21 points using a 50mm f/1.8 lens.
The photos should have been spot on.

Any thoughts?

Comments

  • byoshibyoshi Major grins Posts: 353Registered Users Major grins
    edited April 24, 2012
    The 21 point focus could have thought to put something else in focus. Did you try and shots with single point focus AF-C?
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  • PupatorPupator Major grins Posts: 2,322Registered Users Major grins
    edited April 25, 2012
    Can we have the camera settings for that specific photo? Also, did you check to see which focus point was being used (in the Nikon software)?
  • TuxsterTuxster Big grins Posts: 16Registered Users Big grins
    edited April 26, 2012
    New photos
    I went out and took several more test shots using AF-c in single point focus and all were not very sharp. Have contacted Nikon and have more pictures I can post later with full camera info.


    Thx
  • TuxsterTuxster Big grins Posts: 16Registered Users Big grins
    edited April 26, 2012
    Here is a test photo
    Tuxster wrote: »
    I went out and took several more test shots using AF-c in single point focus and all were not very sharp. Have contacted Nikon and have more pictures I can post later with full camera info.


    Thx
    These were taken last night with AF-C release priority selected.

    File Date Created Date Modified File Size Image Size Date Shot Time Zone and Date Image Quality Artist Copyright Device Lens Focal Length Focus Mode AF-Area Mode VR AF Fine Tune Aperture Shutter Speed Exposure Mode Exposure Comp. Exposure Tuning Metering ISO Sensitivity Device White Balance Color Space High ISO NR Long Exposure NR Active D-Lighting Image Authentication Vignette Control Auto Distortion Control Picture Control Base Quick Adjust Sharpening Contrast Brightness Saturation Hue Filter Effects Toning Latitude Longitude Altitude Altitude Reference Heading UTC Map Datum

    MWJ_2373.NEF 4/25/2012 9:37:54 PM 4/25/2012 9:37:53 PM 19.9 MB L (4928 x 3264) 4/25/2012 16:59:37.60 UTC-5, DST:OFF Compressed RAW (14-bit) Micheal Jennings Nikon D7000 50mm f/1.4D 50mm AF-C Dynamic, 9 points OFF f/5.6 1/1000s Manual 0EV Matrix ISO 400 Auto1, 0, 0 sRGB OFF OFF Normal ON [VI] VIVID [VI] VIVID 0 4 0 0 0 0
  • QarikQarik Krazy Korean Posts: 4,938Registered Users Major grins
    edited April 26, 2012
    hi, one issue here is that you are attachng images which have to be low res and the compression is not giving us a good idea of the softness. do you have hosting site that you can hotlink from?
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  • PupatorPupator Major grins Posts: 2,322Registered Users Major grins
    edited April 26, 2012
    Also, we've got to know which focus point the camera was using. We can't make judgments about the camera if we're not positive that the focus was actually pointed at the right target.
  • TuxsterTuxster Big grins Posts: 16Registered Users Big grins
    edited April 26, 2012
    Full Size Test Photos
    I have posted full size pics for review. The camera was set to AF-C Priority Focus selected.

    http://www.imagebasics.ca/Sports/D7000-Action-Test-Photos/22655516_JS8zWJ

    Thx

    Mike
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Posts: 18,667Super Moderators moderator
    edited April 27, 2012
    I should note that Nikon AF-C is a type of "predictive autofocus" and it takes continuous focus samples and then tries to calculate future focus according to focus tracking trends. This means:
    1) It takes some time for the AF-C to be activated and then for tracking to calculate "and" you need to accurately track the subject. If you lose the subject from the tracking region of AF, the acquisition starts over again and focus may be off in the mean time.

    2) AF-C and IS sometimes seem to work against each other. Both take time to "kick in" and if you don't give each system it's time for operation, results can be sub-nominal.

    My suggestion is to use AF-C for tracking moving subjects, typically as part of a short sequence of continuous shots (burst). If you accurately track the subject for at least 1/2 second (with the shutter button half-depressed during tracking), you should have a high percentage of keepers in the burst.
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • MileHighAkoMileHighAko GWC Posts: 413Registered Users Major grins
    edited April 27, 2012
    Is that the nifty fifty you're shooting with, or the AF-S version? I shoot a lot of sports with my D7K but rarely use the 50mm since I have found it's AF speed to not be as fast as my 70-200. I don't feel as if the AF motor on the D7K body is all that fast, and prefer AF-S lenses. I also find the 50mm to be sharper when shot wide open or close to it. Just my personal experience - no empirical evidence. :)
  • TuxsterTuxster Big grins Posts: 16Registered Users Big grins
    edited April 27, 2012
    Is that the nifty fifty you're shooting with, or the AF-S version? I shoot a lot of sports with my D7K but rarely use the 50mm since I have found it's AF speed to not be as fast as my 70-200. I don't feel as if the AF motor on the D7K body is all that fast, and prefer AF-S lenses. I also find the 50mm to be sharper when shot wide open or close to it. Just my personal experience - no empirical evidence. :)

    For that test I used the 50mm f/1.4 D version. The day before I had the 70-200mm F/2.8 VR II with same results. Nikon has indicated to send it in for repair. I hoping to pickup a D4 this summer, that should give me a camera which can be used in all situations.

    Mike
  • PupatorPupator Major grins Posts: 2,322Registered Users Major grins
    edited April 27, 2012
    I don't have any of these kinds of focus issues with my D7000. It might be a faulty camera but it's not a faulty model of camera.
  • TuxsterTuxster Big grins Posts: 16Registered Users Big grins
    edited April 30, 2012
    Pupator wrote: »
    I don't have any of these kinds of focus issues with my D7000. It might be a faulty camera but it's not a faulty model of camera.

    I just sent the camera to Nikon support today. Will let you know when I get it back what the issue was.

    Thx
  • MusetekMusetek Toothy grins Posts: 42Registered Users Big grins
    edited May 3, 2012
    Solid advice, Ziggy, I learned this the hard way! Also, I find that the predictive autofocus doesn't do as well when the subject is coming straight at you; it seems to have a harder time figuring out the movement or change in distance & location. You're much better off being off to the side slightly, so that the camera has more of a tangent to work with and can more accurately calculate the changing position / distance of the subject.

    I'll be interested to hear what Nikon has to say.
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  • r3t1awr3ydr3t1awr3yd Lifetime Noob! Posts: 1,000Registered Users Major grins
    edited May 3, 2012
    I had my D7k for a couple of months before I had to send it in. It did a great job focusing for a few months then poof. One day it decided to stop focusing and I had to send it in.

    (Possible relevance : I only use single point AF and AF-A)

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  • MJRPHOTOMJRPHOTO Action Sports Posts: 432Registered Users Major grins
    edited May 3, 2012
    Had both my D3 bodys in for cleaning and some refurbishing and had to use my D7000 for a couple of Lacrosse games. What a nightmare. Never again. Shot with a Nikon 300mm f2.8 and a nikon 600 f4.0 and I had alot of OOF photos. Center focus point, AF-C.
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  • PupatorPupator Major grins Posts: 2,322Registered Users Major grins
    edited May 3, 2012
    Strange. I never have focusing trouble with mine.
  • MJRPHOTOMJRPHOTO Action Sports Posts: 432Registered Users Major grins
    edited May 3, 2012
    I don't have to worry.Just got my D4 today. No more D7000 for me.
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  • TuxsterTuxster Big grins Posts: 16Registered Users Big grins
    edited May 5, 2012
    MJRPHOTO wrote: »
    I don't have to worry.Just got my D4 today. No more D7000 for me.

    Seriously, I have to wait a few months before I can even order mine. How do the images compare? Is there really a significant difference? I have not owned a pro body before so looking for a good reason to buy a camera instead of a new car. Humor, almost makes the price justifiable.

    Thx

    Mike
  • TinstaflTinstafl Major grins Posts: 355Registered Users Major grins
    edited June 1, 2012
    YEs it is a huge difference. IT just pops into focus all the time it seems.
    The D4 is amazing.
  • PupatorPupator Major grins Posts: 2,322Registered Users Major grins
    edited June 2, 2012
    I have a D300 and a D7000. I don't notice a difference between the two when it comes to focusing.
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