Tips for better photography

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  • MooreDrivenMooreDriven Major grins Posts: 260Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 13, 2011
    I was listening to Rick Sammon and Juan Pons' podcast this weekend and they said not to delete individual images from a memory card. As Art stated in his post, your more likely to corrupt the card. Rick stated that the card manufacturers recommend formatting the cards. I had heard this when I first started shooting and have followed that advice. Fortunately, I've never had a corrupted card.

    Aussieroo - nice post.

    Dale
  • pathfinderpathfinder Drive By Digital Shooter western IndianaPosts: 14,418Super Moderators moderator
    edited February 15, 2011
    No pdocasts from dgrin that I am aware of...
    Pathfinder - www.pathfinder.smugmug.com

    Moderator of the Technique Forum and Finishing School on Dgrin
  • blizzblizz Big grins Posts: 34Registered Users Big grins
    edited March 3, 2011
    Thanks for the tips!
  • nik8tanik8ta Beginner grinner Posts: 3Registered Users Beginner grinner
    edited April 18, 2011
    The Camera

    1. Buy the best you can afford, upgrade when you get frustrated."



    What a load of crap ... when one gets frustrated, one is supposed to ditch the camera and buy a more expensive one???

    What happens if you still get frustrated?? .. buy THE MOST expensive one????

    Great advice.
  • AussierooAussieroo Old Grin is a good grin Posts: 234Registered Users Major grins
    edited April 19, 2011
    nik8ta wrote: »
    The Camera

    1. Buy the best you can afford, upgrade when you get frustrated."



    What a load of crap ... when one gets frustrated, one is supposed to ditch the camera and buy a more expensive one???

    What happens if you still get frustrated?? .. buy THE MOST expensive one????

    Great advice.

    For a new member I see you are set on making lots of friends here. If you read the post properly and understood it you would know very well what was meant and then it would not have required this ridiculous outburst. If you buy a camera for $150 that is a point and shoot, to see if you like the hobby and you learn all you can with that camera and then become frustrated with the slowness and limitations of it, what else are you to do but up grade. Better doing that than buying a 1DMkIV only to find out you can't get your head around things and don't really enjoy the hobby. So my original advice stands, Buy what you can afford to start with and upgrade if and when that cameras limitations frustrate you.
  • HarrybHarryb old and lazy Viera, FloridaPosts: 22,701Registered Users, Retired Mod Major grins
    edited April 19, 2011
    nik8ta wrote: »
    The Camera

    1. Buy the best you can afford, upgrade when you get frustrated."



    What a load of crap ... when one gets frustrated, one is supposed to ditch the camera and buy a more expensive one???

    What happens if you still get frustrated?? .. buy THE MOST expensive one????

    Great advice.


    You made a pertinent point that got lost in the rather rude manner you expressed it.

    Please fell free to disagree with others but keep it civil.
    Harry
    http://behret.smugmug.com/ NANPA member
    How many photographers does it take to change a light bulb? 50. One to change the bulb, and forty-nine to say, "I could have done that better!"
  • sharagim1sharagim1 Big grins Posts: 69Registered Users Big grins
    edited June 21, 2011
    i"m trying to learn combination ambint light and flash at outdoor photography espacially on sunset time, with 2 off camera flash,
    i couldn"t find some graet source like video tutorial about this, please if somebody have information about my question, response,
    any help would be much apprectied.

    my eqqupement: 5d markll . canon 7d , 2 flash 580 exll, softbox, amberella,
    flex tt1 and flex tt5 (2)
    canon lens 70-200,2.8ll
    caon lens 85mm 1.8
    canon lens28-135
    canon lens 10-22
    canon EOS 7D /canon 5d mark ll/ EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM/EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM/ canon lens 85mm 1.8
  • nickrosephotographynickrosephotography London wedding Photograph Posts: 2Registered Users Beginner grinner
    edited January 11, 2012
    I totally agree with Ryan...never delete duds in camera - there's a great chance that you could delete a good photo. If you're shooting in RAW especially you can salvage 2-3 stops of a poorly exposed image or even post crop if your compositions out. Better to check them on the big screen before you decide on the ones to delete.
  • ten2tenphotographyten2tenphotography Beginner grinner Posts: 4Registered Users Beginner grinner
    edited May 25, 2012
    So many ways to improve yourself!
    I've been reading this forum since I first picked up a camera. I thought it would only be fair to throw in my two cents about learning and bettering yourself.

    I took the Crave Photography mentoring class and it was an amazing experience. I would highly recommend it to any new, intermediate or even advanced photographer. The tips and tricks you learn are extraordinary. I was able to use her techniques and adapt them to my own style so that my work still has my style and is definitely recognizable as my work.

    (She's also having a contest where she's giving away FREE mentorship... it would be a dream for any photog to get that! http://cravemyphotography.com/blog/world-wide-giveaway-2012/ )

    I think one of the best ways to improve your photography is to be humble and accept new knowledge and skills. The best photo you'll take will always be your next one!!
  • juanherediajuanheredia Major grins Madrid, SpainPosts: 345Registered Users Major grins
    edited May 4, 2013
    Great tips, thanks for sharing. thumb.gifup:
  • wasanooboncewasanoobonce Beginner grinner Posts: 4Registered Users Beginner grinner
    edited September 24, 2013
    Thanks for sharing! I'll throw in one I once got from an old-timer: "Be polite, but never too polite". He was referring to taking people around you and infront of the camera into consideration when taking photos, but never to let it distract you from getting that one great shot in your reach.
  • CountrylovingmammaCountrylovingmamma Colorado, USAPosts: 13Registered Users Big grins
    Thank you for this post. It's very helpful I have been a hobbyist on and off for years now and really want to learn more and improve my skills so this is something that is a big help to a newbie of sorts.
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