lp-E6 battery

BountyphotographerBountyphotographer Shoot first and ask laterPosts: 413Registered Users Major grins
edited July 3, 2014 in Accessories
Hi,

I saw the old Thread concerning LP-E6 battery but wanted to know if anything changed?
I just bought a Canon 7 D which comes with a charger and I dont think there is a battery so the question is ..................there a good reliable off brand battery these day?

Thanks


Bounty
:photo

Comments

  • BountyphotographerBountyphotographer Shoot first and ask later Posts: 413Registered Users Major grins
    edited June 28, 2014
    lp-e6
    Anybody??? Don't need to ask your wife or husband anybody????

    rolleyes1.gifroflrolleyes1.gifroflrolleyes1.gifroflrolleyes1.gif
    :photo
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Posts: 20,705Super Moderators moderator
    edited June 30, 2014
    I do prefer the genuine Canon LP-E6 batteries, but I use the third-party, unrecognized, batteries without issue. (The camera reports that it can't register the battery, but you can still proceed without any sort of battery status indicator. I just change batteries and memory cards at the same time.)

    Both Adorama and B&H stock the genuine item, so you can go that route if you wish.

    Many folks are using the third-party "recognized" batteries without problem, so you may wish to try a couple of them, since they run around half the cost.
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • BountyphotographerBountyphotographer Shoot first and ask later Posts: 413Registered Users Major grins
    edited June 30, 2014
    Thanks Ziggy53

    I just got my eBay canon 7 D but no
    battery except 6 eneloop AA :)))
    I however got a Canon charger with
    it . I can't buy a cheap LP-E6 with a
    Canon charger , right ?
    Also I used a compact ultra II card
    yet I can't get more than 4 fps????The only reason I bought that camera was for the 8 fps :{{{{{{{
    I m sure there is a good reason for shooting 4 fps instead of 8 fps juste waiting for someone to give me the reason.
    Wrong card?Wrong batteries ?



    Thanks

    Bounty
    :photo
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Posts: 20,705Super Moderators moderator
    edited July 1, 2014
    I don't have any of the third-party batteries that properly register with the host camera body, but I understand that they "should" charge with a Canon LC-E6 charger (the Canon charger that should have come with the Canon 7D camera.)

    I suggest that it would be best to just order a "kit" which has at least a couple of the third-party batteries that register with the body "plus" the third-party charger. In such a kit, the charger is generally a small additional fee. Perhaps some here have recommendations for such a kit.


    Maximum initial fps should be a camera "buffer" limitation. After the buffer fills, then the memory card affects transfer speed and subsequent fps storage speeds.


    The things that can affect Canon burst speed (fps) are:
    • Shutter speed, longer shutter speeds result in a slower burst rate.
    • High-ISO noise reduction, at the strong noise reduction setting it has a noticeable effect on the burst rate.
    • I think that the 7D has the ability to detect light flicker and implement a strategy to prevent the flicker from affecting AF and metering accuracy. I believe that would affect the speed to first shot and that the burst rate might also be affected. (I could not immediately find the reference however.)
    • Do not use AI Servo for static subjects. AI Servo, by design, samples subject motion and will try to calculate future prime focus based on the sampled speed and rate of change. The effect on static subjects is unpredictable focus behavior. One-Shot AF is correct for (relatively) static subjects.

    On the 7D, and only the 7D I believe, the new metering system can slow down the frame rate to favor AF accuracy. There is even a vague reference in the 7D User Manual. (Bottom of page 93.)

    http://media.the-digital-picture.com/Owners-Manuals/Canon-EOS-7D-Owners-Manual.pdf

    "In low-light areas or indoors, the continuous shooting speed may become slower even if a fast shuttter speed is set"
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • BountyphotographerBountyphotographer Shoot first and ask later Posts: 413Registered Users Major grins
    edited July 1, 2014
    Ha ha ha ha too late this morning I was playing around and was able to get 8 fps with the 6 AA batteries but I really appreciate all the info that you gave me .

    Thank you Ziggy53

    ziggy53 wrote: »
    I don't have any of the third-party batteries that properly register with the host camera body, but I understand that they "should" charge with a Canon LC-E6 charger (the Canon charger that should have come with the Canon 7D camera.)

    I suggest that it would be best to just order a "kit" which has at least a couple of the third-party batteries that register with the body "plus" the third-party charger. In such a kit, the charger is generally a small additional fee. Perhaps some here have recommendations for such a kit.


    Maximum initial fps should be a camera "buffer" limitation. After the buffer fills, then the memory card affects transfer speed and subsequent fps storage speeds.


    The things that can affect Canon burst speed (fps) are:
    • Shutter speed, longer shutter speeds result in a slower burst rate.
    • High-ISO noise reduction, at the strong noise reduction setting it has a noticeable effect on the burst rate.
    • I think that the 7D has the ability to detect light flicker and implement a strategy to prevent the flicker from affecting AF and metering accuracy. I believe that would affect the speed to first shot and that the burst rate might also be affected. (I could not immediately find the reference however.)
    • Do not use AI Servo for static subjects. AI Servo, by design, samples subject motion and will try to calculate future prime focus based on the sampled speed and rate of change. The effect on static subjects is unpredictable focus behavior. One-Shot AF is correct for (relatively) static subjects.
    On the 7D, and only the 7D I believe, the new metering system can slow down the frame rate to favor AF accuracy. There is even a vague reference in the 7D User Manual. (Bottom of page 93.)

    http://media.the-digital-picture.com/Owners-Manuals/Canon-EOS-7D-Owners-Manual.pdf

    "In low-light areas or indoors, the continuous shooting speed may become slower even if a fast shuttter speed is set"
    :photo
  • BountyphotographerBountyphotographer Shoot first and ask later Posts: 413Registered Users Major grins
    edited July 1, 2014
    By the way what is the best way to check the shutter count?
    The camera looks like new but would like to know the actuation count.

    thank

    Bounty
    :photo
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Posts: 20,705Super Moderators moderator
    edited July 1, 2014
    I don't believe that the Canon 7D is designed to provide an easy method of reading shutter actuations. There appear to be a number of methods people have tried, but no absolutely certain methods that work with all versions of 7D firmware (that I could find.) and certainly no methods that work with all operating systems.

    I suggest not worrying about shutter count, however, the following method seams to work reasonably well with the Canon cameras I have tried it on:
    I do believe that genuine Canon service centers can read that information directly from the camera with a special hardware and software.

    You can get reasonably close if the image-file numbering has not rolled over and you put a brand new memory card (that has never been in a camera) into the camera and set the camera for auto-numbering and then take a shot. You should be able to figure out the count from the file name.

    If you use a card which has ever been in a camera, the camera will pick up the count from the old card, even if there are no images on the card, so it needs to be a new card (or a card that has been re-formatted properly in a computer, and then in the camera. A new card is just much simpler.)

    If the file counter has rolled over, then the resulting file name will be off by the number of rotations the counter has rolled over.

    If you can't figure out the image count from the resulting file name, just give us the file name and we should be able to help.

    The most accurate count will probably still be from Canon since that shows total actuations, not just images recorded.
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • BountyphotographerBountyphotographer Shoot first and ask later Posts: 413Registered Users Major grins
    edited July 1, 2014
    Thank you

    ziggy53 wrote: »
    I don't believe that the Canon 7D is designed to provide an easy method of reading shutter actuations. There appear to be a number of methods people have tried, but no absolutely certain methods that work with all versions of 7D firmware (that I could find.) and certainly no methods that work with all operating systems.

    I suggest not worrying about shutter count, however, the following method seams to work reasonably well with the Canon cameras I have tried it on:
    I do believe that genuine Canon service centers can read that information directly from the camera with a special hardware and software.

    You can get reasonably close if the image-file numbering has not rolled over and you put a brand new memory card (that has never been in a camera) into the camera and set the camera for auto-numbering and then take a shot. You should be able to figure out the count from the file name.

    If you use a card which has ever been in a camera, the camera will pick up the count from the old card, even if there are no images on the card, so it needs to be a new card (or a card that has been re-formatted properly in a computer, and then in the camera. A new card is just much simpler.)

    If the file counter has rolled over, then the resulting file name will be off by the number of rotations the counter has rolled over.

    If you can't figure out the image count from the resulting file name, just give us the file name and we should be able to help.

    The most accurate count will probably still be from Canon since that shows total actuations, not just images recorded.
    :photo
  • AllenAllen "tweak 'til it squeaks" St. Louis, MoPosts: 9,503Registered Users Major grins
    edited July 1, 2014
    I use a simple system to track photos, not sure if this is actual shutter count but has to be very close.
    When I convert from raw in DPP I append the image name with the camera and roll over count.

    IMG_1215_30D2-2 << image 21215
    IMG_6937_7D1-4 << image 46937
    IMG_9270_7D2 << image 9270
    IMG_2438_7D2-1 << image 12438

    I have two 30D and 7D, why the D1 and D2
    the -1 and -4 are roll over numbers so -4 would be 40000 series photos.

    If I happen to shoot some JPG's (rare) I'll bulk append the files to comply as I go along.

    When looking at photo info in Smug I can see what camera the photo was shot with.
    Plus I have no dup file names.
    Al - Just a volunteer here having fun
    My Website | My Blog
  • BountyphotographerBountyphotographer Shoot first and ask later Posts: 413Registered Users Major grins
    edited July 3, 2014
    Thank you


    Bounty
    Allen wrote: »
    I use a simple system to track photos, not sure if this is actual shutter count but has to be very close.
    When I convert from raw in DPP I append the image name with the camera and roll over count.

    IMG_1215_30D2-2 << image 21215
    IMG_6937_7D1-4 << image 46937
    IMG_9270_7D2 << image 9270
    IMG_2438_7D2-1 << image 12438

    I have two 30D and 7D, why the D1 and D2
    the -1 and -4 are roll over numbers so -4 would be 40000 series photos.

    If I happen to shoot some JPG's (rare) I'll bulk append the files to comply as I go along.

    When looking at photo info in Smug I can see what camera the photo was shot with.
    Plus I have no dup file names.
    :photo
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