Son's wedding

kdotaylorkdotaylor Major grinsPosts: 1,263Registered Users Major grins
edited October 18, 2014 in Weddings
My son was married this past weekend. It was a very low-key event in a log cabin in northern MN. A friend had agreed to photograph the wedding; she had a film camera only, appeared nervous, and ran out of film during the ceremony (!) So, though I hadn't intended to take any pictures, and didn't have a flash with me, I took these shots. It was extremely dark in the cabin, so I bumped up the ISO, and of course I'm disappointed with the shots for the grain and the soft focus.
Is there anything I could have done? Anything I can do yet now?
#1
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#2
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#3
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#4
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#5
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#6
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#7
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#8
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#9
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#10
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Kate
www.katetaylor.smugmug.com
"You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus." Mark Twain

Comments

  • zoomerzoomer Major grins Posts: 3,688Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 13, 2014
    I think they will be glad you were there to get some pictures. Sometimes technical quality of the images takes a back seat.
    If you have your heart set on messing with them....noise control first...reduce color a smidge or go black and white...sharpen them....check noise again. Play with maybe a smidge more contrast and check your white and black levels.
  • Matthew SavilleMatthew Saville Wedding Photographer Southern CaliforniaPosts: 3,352Registered Users, Retired Mod Major grins
    edited October 16, 2014
    Honestly, I've never been really all that bothered by grain, or slight fuzziness, when it comes to capturing memories for myself. For a client, sure, but only because I'm trying to deliver a product that I'm getting paid lots of $$$ to deliver. For personal use, I just kick it to B&W, or let the colors be what they are, (all look great here) ...and let grain be grain. In all honesty, a little grain (or even a lot) looks more realistic and genuine than a smeared, noise-reduced image in my opinion. So, you got some great shots, now just print them out and enjoy them! The couple's kids and grandkids will appreciate it no matter what... :-)

    =Matt=
    My first thought is always of light.” – Galen Rowell
    My SmugMug PortfolioMy Astro-Landscape Photo BlogDgrin Weddings Forum
  • AlexSharkAlexShark Canonizer Posts: 198Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 16, 2014
    Love #8! Great action, expressions, and the tiny hand sticking out of the bottom-right corner. If the image is cropped, I'd restore it to full size. Can't crop out life.
    Photography is about what does not meet the eye
    Be my guest: Alex Braverman Photography
  • kdotaylorkdotaylor Major grins Posts: 1,263Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 18, 2014
    Honestly, I've never been really all that bothered by grain, or slight fuzziness, when it comes to capturing memories for myself. For a client, sure, but only because I'm trying to deliver a product that I'm getting paid lots of $$$ to deliver. For personal use, I just kick it to B&W, or let the colors be what they are, (all look great here) ...and let grain be grain. In all honesty, a little grain (or even a lot) looks more realistic and genuine than a smeared, noise-reduced image in my opinion. So, you got some great shots, now just print them out and enjoy them! The couple's kids and grandkids will appreciate it no matter what... :-)

    =Matt=

    Thanks, that makes me feel a bit better
    Kate
    www.katetaylor.smugmug.com
    "You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus." Mark Twain
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