Son's wedding

kdotaylorkdotaylor Major grinsRegistered Users Posts: 1,265 Major grins
edited October 18, 2014 in Weddings
My son was married this past weekend. It was a very low-key event in a log cabin in northern MN. A friend had agreed to photograph the wedding; she had a film camera only, appeared nervous, and ran out of film during the ceremony (!) So, though I hadn't intended to take any pictures, and didn't have a flash with me, I took these shots. It was extremely dark in the cabin, so I bumped up the ISO, and of course I'm disappointed with the shots for the grain and the soft focus.
Is there anything I could have done? Anything I can do yet now?
#1
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#2
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#3
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#4
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#5
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#6
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#7
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#8
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#9
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#10
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Kate
www.katetaylor.smugmug.com
"You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus." Mark Twain

Comments

  • zoomerzoomer Major grins Registered Users Posts: 3,688 Major grins
    edited October 13, 2014
    I think they will be glad you were there to get some pictures. Sometimes technical quality of the images takes a back seat.
    If you have your heart set on messing with them....noise control first...reduce color a smidge or go black and white...sharpen them....check noise again. Play with maybe a smidge more contrast and check your white and black levels.
  • Matthew SavilleMatthew Saville Wedding Photographer Southern CaliforniaRegistered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 3,352 Major grins
    edited October 16, 2014
    Honestly, I've never been really all that bothered by grain, or slight fuzziness, when it comes to capturing memories for myself. For a client, sure, but only because I'm trying to deliver a product that I'm getting paid lots of $$$ to deliver. For personal use, I just kick it to B&W, or let the colors be what they are, (all look great here) ...and let grain be grain. In all honesty, a little grain (or even a lot) looks more realistic and genuine than a smeared, noise-reduced image in my opinion. So, you got some great shots, now just print them out and enjoy them! The couple's kids and grandkids will appreciate it no matter what... :-)

    =Matt=
    My first thought is always of light.” – Galen Rowell
    My SmugMug PortfolioMy Astro-Landscape Photo BlogDgrin Weddings Forum
  • AlexSharkAlexShark Canonizer Registered Users Posts: 198 Major grins
    edited October 16, 2014
    Love #8! Great action, expressions, and the tiny hand sticking out of the bottom-right corner. If the image is cropped, I'd restore it to full size. Can't crop out life.
    Photography is about what does not meet the eye
    Be my guest: Alex Braverman Photography
  • kdotaylorkdotaylor Major grins Registered Users Posts: 1,265 Major grins
    edited October 18, 2014
    Honestly, I've never been really all that bothered by grain, or slight fuzziness, when it comes to capturing memories for myself. For a client, sure, but only because I'm trying to deliver a product that I'm getting paid lots of $$$ to deliver. For personal use, I just kick it to B&W, or let the colors be what they are, (all look great here) ...and let grain be grain. In all honesty, a little grain (or even a lot) looks more realistic and genuine than a smeared, noise-reduced image in my opinion. So, you got some great shots, now just print them out and enjoy them! The couple's kids and grandkids will appreciate it no matter what... :-)

    =Matt=

    Thanks, that makes me feel a bit better
    Kate
    www.katetaylor.smugmug.com
    "You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus." Mark Twain
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