Eclipse 2017

JCJC Major grinsPosts: 768Registered Users Major grins
edited November 25, 2016 in Location, Location, Location!
So, I can assume people have started making their plans for next summers eclipse?

I want to try to come back the U.S. for this, I've never been an eclipse chaser, but this seems like too good an opportunity to skip.

I'm trying to work out the geometry in different places, and see how I can get close enough to enough topography to get landscape shots of the eclipse itself. But, I wonder if I should be thinking about going the other route, and going somewhere when I can have a camera shooting down during the eclipse and catch the Moon's shadow across the landscape.

What are you plans?
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Comments

  • Cygnus StudiosCygnus Studios Commercial Photographer San Francisco's North BayPosts: 2,294Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 21, 2016
    We have clients already lining up to have their products shot during the next eclipse. We'll be traveling up to Oregon to get in the direct line.

    Here is a neat site to line up specific areas: Just adjust your city/time and you can line up the sun/eclipse against specific buildings, landscapes, skylines, etc.
    Steve

    Website
  • JCJC Major grins Posts: 768Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 22, 2016
    I've been scoping out some places in the Tetons that would be great, but I guess the weather in late August would be hard to rely on.
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  • David_S85David_S85 Spotter of Dgrin Spam and Oddities ChicagolandPosts: 12,333Administrators moderator
    edited November 22, 2016
    I know of solar scopes and solar filters for real amateur telescopes, but do extremely strong (greater than ND400) filters exist for regular telephoto lenses?

    EDIT: Perhaps my ND400 could work, in live view mode. Anyone have experience doing this? I'd never look at the sun through the eyepiece at any time, ever.
    My Smugmug
    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take" - Wayne Gretzky
  • David_S85David_S85 Spotter of Dgrin Spam and Oddities ChicagolandPosts: 12,333Administrators moderator
    edited November 22, 2016
    My Smugmug
    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take" - Wayne Gretzky
  • Cygnus StudiosCygnus Studios Commercial Photographer San Francisco's North BayPosts: 2,294Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 22, 2016
    ND400 is around 9 stops. You can find 15, 16 or 20 stops although they can get a tad pricey.

    Another option is going with Thousand Oaks Optical. Their filters are superb and cheap. They make most common threaded sizes for camera lenses.
    Steve

    Website
  • David_S85David_S85 Spotter of Dgrin Spam and Oddities ChicagolandPosts: 12,333Administrators moderator
    edited November 22, 2016
    Great link. Thanks!
    ND400 is around 9 stops. You can find 15, 16 or 20 stops although they can get a tad pricey.
    Another option is going with Thousand Oaks Optical. Their filters are superb and cheap. They make most common threaded sizes for camera lenses.
    My Smugmug
    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take" - Wayne Gretzky
  • JCJC Major grins Posts: 768Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 23, 2016
    David_S85 wrote: »
    I know of solar scopes and solar filters for real amateur telescopes, but do extremely strong (greater than ND400) filters exist for regular telephoto lenses?

    EDIT: Perhaps my ND400 could work, in live view mode. Anyone have experience doing this? I'd never look at the sun through the eyepiece at any time, ever.

    I shot both the Venus Transit and the Mercury Transit with a 1000x ND filter and live view mode. If you look up the filter transmission, ND filters won't filter out the IR so I wouldn't use just an ND filter in optical mode, and even 1/1000 VIS transmission might be bad- I was also worried about the IR damaging the sensor or the shutter, even with the IR cut filter, so I had a black cloth to toss over the front of the camera lens between shots.


    I've since bought a roll of optical solar film with which to make custom filters. If you want to shop for filters, start now, they will sell out based on the last partial solar eclipse.
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  • JCJC Major grins Posts: 768Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 23, 2016
    Start of the last partial solar eclipse in the U.S., ND filters, 1000x and and variable ND stacked (Maybe the ND 3 as well, I'd need to look up my notes), 400mm lens. The eclipse ended in sunset haze, so the 1000x was sufficient at the end, this one in August will be overhead, so assuming no monsoon thunderstorms, no atmospheric help with filters.
    i-2J7XzHt-M.jpg
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  • roaddog52roaddog52 Major grins In the sticks, NE of SeattlePosts: 1,109Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 23, 2016
    In the past I have used a welding hood with a shade 14 lens to safely view the eclipse . Although most welders use a "speedglass" style of hood these days, I believe replacement lens are still available for older style hoods. A large lens is 4-1/2"x5" or so. Polycarbonate replacement lens should cost 8$-10$. If you can find a gold colored lens you get the added benefit of IR reflection from the gold coating.
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  • Cygnus StudiosCygnus Studios Commercial Photographer San Francisco's North BayPosts: 2,294Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 23, 2016
    In the past I've used welder's glass over the lens but it throws off the white balance something awful. It works, don't get me wrong, but solar filters are plenty cheap enough. As JC said, order soon as they will sell out long before the eclipse comes around.
    Steve

    Website
  • JCJC Major grins Posts: 768Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 25, 2016
    I'm wondering if my Zuiko 300mm 4.5 lens +M43 camera will suffice me for the telephoto shots. It would save me the weight of carrying in my Canon 400mm 5.6, and it might just be a light enough setup for a portable lower end tracking mount I've never sprung for before.
    Yeah, if you recognize the avatar, new user name.
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