Travel Kit for European River Cruise?

sapphire73sapphire73 Major grinsPennsylvaniaRegistered Users Posts: 1,754 Major grins
edited November 30, 2016 in Cameras
Looking for input on what to take on a cruise along the Rhine and Moselle rivers with a few days in Bruges at the end.

I have traveled internationally many times before - most recently to the Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso in August and Brazil earlier this month. I am currently relying quite a bit on my Canon 70D paired with a Canon 28mm prime lens for a fast, relatively inconspicuous lens on our travels. I usually take a telephoto zoom as well. But on vacation, I tend to want more flexibility.

On this trip, I think I will want more reach and may want to go wide for landscapes and shots of architecture, World War 1 battlefields in Belgium, etc. And cruising in November means fewer hours of daylight and trying to get some shots at twilight or at night, so I want to take a fast lens and a camera body that handles high ISO pretty well.

The first 3 options reflect lenses that I currently own that are "relatively" lightweight:

Option 1 -
70 D camera
28 mm prime
10-22 wide angle lens
Canon 18-135 mm zoom

Option 2 -
70 D camera
28 mm prime
Canon 18-200 mm zoom (or Tamron 18-270 PZD zoom)

Option 3 -
70 D camera
28 mm prime
10-22 wide angle lens
Canon 70-300 mm

Wild Card Option 4?
Fujifilm X-T1 camera
Fuji 18-135 mm WR lens
(maybe an additional prime lens)

After reading several threads in this camera forum, I am thinking about possibly purchasing a mirrorless camera and lens. (This is something I considered briefly a couple of years ago when getting knee replacement surgery but decided to wait and see how these cameras evolved.)

Would the Fujifilm X-T1 with the 18-135 mm weather resistant lens be a good option for a travel kit? Perhaps adding a fast prime as well? I like to shoot jpg & RAW, generally processing the RAW files in Digital Photo Professional, Lightroom 5, and then finishing up in PSE (if I want to work with layers, etc.). Looks like there may be a learning curve to shoot with this camera? And a learning curve to process the Fuji RAW (RAF) files?

Option 5 Hybrid:
70 D camera
28 mm prime
10-22 wide angle lens
and
Fujifilm X-T1 camera
Fuji 18-135 mm WR lens

This option would give me a bit more flexibility to decide what to carry with me depending on the weather and the port we are exploring (as well as amount of anticipated walking/climbing). And I could take both camera bodies when going by van, bus, canal boat, etc.

One last thing, I own 2 point and shoot cameras and often take one or the other as a back up when we travel in Africa. But I find that I rely more on my iPhone 5 then the Canon point and shoots.

Thank you!

Comments

  • denisegoldbergdenisegoldberg Major grins North Andover, MASuper Moderators Posts: 13,474 moderator
    edited October 23, 2015
    sapphire73 wrote: »
    Would the Fujifilm X-T1 with the 18-135 mm weather resistant lens be a good option for a travel kit? Perhaps adding a fast prime as well? I like to shoot jpg & RAW, generally processing the RAW files in Digital Photo Professional, Lightroom 5, and then finishing up in PSE (if I want to work with layers, etc.). Looks like there may be a learning curve to shoot with this camera? And a learning curve to process the Fuji RAW (RAF) files?
    I purchased a Fuji X-T1 in the middle of the summer. My other camera is a Canon 7D.

    I have since taken two trips where the XT1 was the only camera I carried. My shots varied between the 18-135mm WR lens and the 10-24mm.

    My first impressions of the camera are noted in my blog post http://denisegoldberg.blogspot.com/2015/08/first-impressions-fuji-x-t1.html.

    There are comments from a number of folks on the XT1 in the thread D750 or Fuji XT1?.

    If you're interested in photos, these are from the two trips I took with the XT1 as my only camera:
    http://www.denisegoldberg.com/Travel/Badlands-to-Mountains
    http://www.denisegoldberg.com/Travel/Midcoast-Downeast-Maine-2015

    I'd say this is an excellent choice for a travel camera.

    --- Denise
  • sapphire73sapphire73 Major grins PennsylvaniaRegistered Users Posts: 1,754 Major grins
    edited October 23, 2015
    I purchased a Fuji X-T1 in the middle of the summer. My other camera is a Canon 7D.

    I have since taken two trips where the XT1 was the only camera I carried. My shots varied between the 18-135mm WR lens and the 10-24mm.

    My first impressions of the camera are noted in my blog post http://denisegoldberg.blogspot.com/2015/08/first-impressions-fuji-x-t1.html.

    There are comments from a number of folks on the XT1 in the thread D750 or Fuji XT1?.

    If you're interested in photos, these are from the two trips I took with the XT1 as my only camera:
    http://www.denisegoldberg.com/Travel/Badlands-to-Mountains
    http://www.denisegoldberg.com/Travel/Midcoast-Downeast-Maine-2015

    I'd say this is an excellent choice for a travel camera.

    --- Denise

    Hi Denise, I have read the dgrin thread you mention and have already read your blogpost and looked through your Maine photos. Thank you for sharing your take on this camera and the great shots you've captured! I remembered that you have a zoom lens (and a macro for flowers?) but missed the 10-24mm. Are you pretty happy with the 18-135 mm? And which lens were you using for the shots from Cadillac mountain?

    Looks like B & H photo is offering the XT1 body bundled with the 18-135 mm lens.

    Thanks for your input!
  • denisegoldbergdenisegoldberg Major grins North Andover, MASuper Moderators Posts: 13,474 moderator
    edited October 23, 2015
    sapphire73 wrote: »
    Hi Denise, I have read the dgrin thread you mention and have already read your blogpost and looked through your Maine photos. Thank you for sharing your take on this camera and the great shots you've captured! I remembered that you have a zoom lens (and a macro for flowers?) but missed the 10-24mm. Are you pretty happy with the 18-135 mm? And which lens were you using for the shots from Cadillac mountain?

    Looks like B & H photo is offering the XT1 body bundled with the 18-135 mm lens.
    That's how I purchased mine - from B&H bundled with the 18-135.

    The shots from Cadillac Mountain were taken with the 18-135mm lens. When I first got the camera I was hoping not to need a wide angle lens but I wasn't happy without it given the locations I was shooting. It's entirely possible it will be wide enough for you - but only you know that.

    It's pretty amazing what a difference the size and weight of the camera makes though - it's quite noticeable, and I love the smaller form factor.

    --- Denise
  • denisegoldbergdenisegoldberg Major grins North Andover, MASuper Moderators Posts: 13,474 moderator
    edited October 23, 2015
    sapphire73 wrote: »
    ...I like to shoot jpg & RAW, generally processing the RAW files in Digital Photo Professional, Lightroom 5, and then finishing up in PSE (if I want to work with layers, etc.). Looks like there may be a learning curve to shoot with this camera? And a learning curve to process the Fuji RAW (RAF) files?
    You won't have a problem with the Fuji RAW files. I'm still using Lightroom 5 (will likely upgrade to 6 soon) and it handles the raw files without a problem.

    --- Denise
  • sapphire73sapphire73 Major grins PennsylvaniaRegistered Users Posts: 1,754 Major grins
    edited October 23, 2015
    Thanks, Denise. Very helpful!

    On another note, I just did the math for camera body + wide angle zoom + 18-135 mm for each system.

    Canon 70D, Canon 10-22mm lens, Canon 18-135 mm lens = roughly 3lb 11oz and cost to replace (new) from B & H would be a little over $2,000

    Fujifilm XT1, Fuji 10-24mm lens, Fuji 18-135 mm lens = roughly 3 lbs and cost to replace (new) from B & H would be a little less than $3,000

    So perhaps buying this camera is not a realistic way to minimize the weight of the travel kit I take. But I gather it would help with the overall bulk? Hmmm.

    I have read some glowing reviews of the XT1 and other mirrorless cameras so there be other good reasons why people are turning to them?
  • denisegoldbergdenisegoldberg Major grins North Andover, MASuper Moderators Posts: 13,474 moderator
    edited October 23, 2015
    I have no idea how the 70D compares with the 7D size and weight-wise but I can tell you there is a noticeable difference between the 7D and the XT1. I'd recommend that you hold both cameras as part of your decision process.
  • sapphire73sapphire73 Major grins PennsylvaniaRegistered Users Posts: 1,754 Major grins
    edited October 23, 2015
    Travel Kit for European River Cruise?
    Hi Denise - I have the 7D and got the 4ti as a lighter weight option (around the time of knee replacement). I was given an opportunity to get the 70D a year ago and really like it. (Kept the 7D for my husband to use when he gets a chance to photograph birds.)

    But fitting camera gear, change of clothes, and other essentials in a smallish carry-on is always a challenge! And I also like the idea of carrying a smaller, less conspicuous camera bag - even if the contents aren't much lighter.

    How long did it take you to get comfortable shooting with the TX1? I have a couple of weeks before leave. Shoot aperture priority most of the time and manual if I can take my time.

    Thanks again! Really appreciate your willingness to help others on dgrin.
  • Brett1000Brett1000 Major grins https://www.flickr.com/photos/photoscw/Registered Users Posts: 819 Major grins
    edited October 23, 2015
    sapphire73 wrote: »
    Looking for input on what to take on a cruise along the Rhine and Moselle rivers with a few days in Bruges at the end.

    I have traveled internationally many times before - most recently to the Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso in August and Brazil earlier this month. I am currently relying quite a bit on my Canon 70D paired with a Canon 28mm prime lens for a fast, relatively inconspicuous lens on our travels. I usually take a telephoto zoom as well. But on vacation, I tend to want more flexibility.

    On this trip, I think I will want more reach and may want to go wide for landscapes and shots of architecture, World War 1 battlefields in Belgium, etc. And cruising in November means fewer hours of daylight and trying to get some shots at twilight or at night, so I want to take a fast lens and a camera body that handles high ISO pretty well.

    The first 3 options reflect lenses that I currently own that are "relatively" lightweight:

    Option 1 -
    70 D camera
    28 mm prime
    10-22 wide angle lens
    Canon 18-135 mm zoom

    Option 2 -
    70 D camera
    28 mm prime
    Canon 18-200 mm zoom (or Tamron 18-270 PZD zoom)

    Option 3 -
    70 D camera
    28 mm prime
    10-22 wide angle lens
    Canon 70-300 mm

    Wild Card Option 4?
    Fujifilm X-T1 camera
    Fuji 18-135 mm WR lens
    (maybe an additional prime lens)

    After reading several threads in this camera forum, I am thinking about possibly purchasing a mirrorless camera and lens. (This is something I considered briefly a couple of years ago when getting knee replacement surgery but decided to wait and see how these cameras evolved.)

    Would the Fujifilm X-T1 with the 18-135 mm weather resistant lens be a good option for a travel kit? Perhaps adding a fast prime as well? I like to shoot jpg & RAW, generally processing the RAW files in Digital Photo Professional, Lightroom 5, and then finishing up in PSE (if I want to work with layers, etc.). Looks like there may be a learning curve to shoot with this camera? And a learning curve to process the Fuji RAW (RAF) files?

    Option 5 Hybrid:
    70 D camera
    28 mm prime
    10-22 wide angle lens
    and
    Fujifilm X-T1 camera
    Fuji 18-135 mm WR lens

    This option would give me a bit more flexibility to decide what to carry with me depending on the weather and the port we are exploring (as well as amount of anticipated walking/climbing). And I could take both camera bodies when going by van, bus, canal boat, etc.

    One last thing, I own 2 point and shoot cameras and often take one or the other as a back up when we travel in Africa. But I find that I rely more on my iPhone 5 then the Canon point and shoots.

    Thank you!
    /COLOR]


    The Fuji looks like it would work. I went on river cruise (Virginia) and took the Canon M with the 22mm f/2 pancake lens and the 50mm 1.8. Didn't even need a bag, just fits in the pocket. I believe most of the mirrorless models (Sony) can also take Canon lens with an adapter

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mmirrorless/
  • bike21bike21 Major grins Registered Users Posts: 836 Major grins
    edited October 23, 2015
    Not much time to write at the moment, but XT-1 all the way (see previous blog write up below)

    http://www.nicklasurephotography.com/blog/2015/2/25/packing-light-in-paris-a-journey-with-the-fuji-x-t1
  • sapphire73sapphire73 Major grins PennsylvaniaRegistered Users Posts: 1,754 Major grins
    edited October 23, 2015
    Bike21, great review. Thanks for the link. Love your Crested Butte photo! Lots of food for thought....
  • z_28z_28 Absolutely Nothing Registered Users Posts: 956 Major grins
    edited October 23, 2015
    Hi,
    I'm not in Canon court since 1D Mk. IIn !
    but your kit Option 3 -
    70 D camera
    28 mm prime
    10-22 wide angle lens
    Canon 70-300 mm

    looks pretty similar to my carry out light bag :
    Nikon D300, D300s, D7200 (one only at the time :^)
    Nikon 12-24
    Nikon 70-300 VR
    35/1.8 or 50/1.8

    My only concern is Canon 70-300 - not sure it's good enough ...

    Anyway - I carry in pocket Sony RX100 - it really works.
    D300, D70s, 10.5/2.8, 17-55/2.8, 24-85/2.8-4, 50/1.4, 70-200VR, 70-300VR, 60/2.8, SB800, SB80DX, SD8A, MB-D10 ...
    XTi, G9, 16-35/2.8L, 100-300USM, 70-200/4L, 19-35, 580EX II, CP-E3, 500/8 ...
    DSC-R1, HFL-F32X ... ; AG-DVX100B and stuff ... (I like this 10 years old signature :^)
  • sapphire73sapphire73 Major grins PennsylvaniaRegistered Users Posts: 1,754 Major grins
    edited October 23, 2015
    z_28 wrote: »
    Hi,
    I'm not in Canon court since 1D Mk. IIn !
    but your kit Option 3 -
    70 D camera
    28 mm prime
    10-22 wide angle lens
    Canon 70-300 mm

    looks pretty similar to my carry out light bag :
    Nikon D300, D300s, D7200 (one only at the time :^)
    Nikon 12-24
    Nikon 70-300 VR
    35/1.8 or 50/1.8

    My only concern is Canon 70-300 - not sure it's good enough ...

    Anyway - I carry in pocket Sony RX100 - it really works.

    Thanks for your input on one of the Canon options. And your recommendation of the Sony RX100. Looks like there are several versions of that camera?

    The Canon 70-300 is a pretty good lens. Lots of keepers from our trip to Masai Mara in 2014. Bought in Breckenridge at the recommendation of David Carter Pfau.
  • z_28z_28 Absolutely Nothing Registered Users Posts: 956 Major grins
    edited October 24, 2015
    If Canon 70-300 IS is same good as Nikon 70-300 VR - you got your set :^)
    With crop 450mm in light package is "priceless". If glass is really good.

    Sony RX100 got actually 4 Marks.
    I think all are very good, some additions may be worth extra money, but not necessary !
    Even first version is worth a lot on the travel into unknown :^D
    Same 20 MP - good ones only, recommended.

    Mark III may be "that one" but I bought Mark II last year and I'm very happy.
    D300, D70s, 10.5/2.8, 17-55/2.8, 24-85/2.8-4, 50/1.4, 70-200VR, 70-300VR, 60/2.8, SB800, SB80DX, SD8A, MB-D10 ...
    XTi, G9, 16-35/2.8L, 100-300USM, 70-200/4L, 19-35, 580EX II, CP-E3, 500/8 ...
    DSC-R1, HFL-F32X ... ; AG-DVX100B and stuff ... (I like this 10 years old signature :^)
  • sapphire73sapphire73 Major grins PennsylvaniaRegistered Users Posts: 1,754 Major grins
    edited November 28, 2016
    I came back to this thread to check out what folks said about mirrorless cameras. But I see that I never got around to sharing what I took on our river cruise last November and what worked (and didn't work) for me. So I am reposting something I shared on another website. And providing links to a gallery of photos from our river cruise on the Rhine and Mosel rivers and the Rhine & Mosel Rivers travelog shared elsewhere on dgrin.

    Hope this helps someone else!

    As mentioned above, I wanted to keep my overall camera kit relatively light but also have some flexibility as to the kinds of photos I could take. Everyone will have different priorities, and I am just sharing what worked for me.

    Cameras:
    Canon 70D
    Canon Powershot SX260 HS
    iPhone camera

    I rarely used the Canon Powershot, pulling it out in Trier because it was just too wet to use the Canon 70D. I used the iPhone more than the Powershot for casual photos.

    Lenses:
    Canon 28 mm prime (compact, good in low light, great walk around lens)
    Canon 18-135 mm STM lens (moderate zoom lens)
    Canon 10-22 mm (great for wide angle shots of landscapes and buildings)
    Canon 70-300 mm (in case I want to really zoom in on something)

    The lenses I used the most were the 28 mm lens and the 18-135 zoom. I was very glad to have the 10-22 lens with me and used it to photograph some buildings. I rarely used the 70-300 mm lens, but this was partly because it was easier to keep shooting with the 18-135 and crop the photo later than to switch lenses. (An 18-200 mm lens might have been a good compromise.)

    Camera bag:
    Pacsafe Camsafe V8 Anti-theft Camera Shoulder Bag

    I highly recommend the Camsafe camera bag. It helped me carry my camera kit and access everything easily. I could fit the camera and 3 lenses (one on the camera body) inside the case. I carried the small point and shoot camera in one of the side pockets and a bottle of water in the other. There is a pocket on the back of the bag that can easily hold an iPad mini. I used it for the maps and other sheets they gave us for each port ("archiving" the old ones in a clear plastic envelope to bring home with me). I had planned to carry a small Pacsafe purse as well but was able to fit my travel wallet, kleenex, chapstick, extra memory card, extra battery, etc. in the front zippered section of the camera bag.

    What I Didn't Bring
    External flash
    Tripod or monopod

    I did not bother with a tripod or monopod except for a small gorillapod. If the light was very low, I went with a higher ISO and hoped for the best. It might have been nice to have a tripod to take a better photo of the Nijmegen bridge all lit up at night.
  • Brett1000Brett1000 Major grins https://www.flickr.com/photos/photoscw/Registered Users Posts: 819 Major grins
    edited November 30, 2016
    sapphire73 wrote: »
    I came back to this thread to check out what folks said about mirrorless cameras. But I see that I never got around to sharing what I took on our river cruise last November and what worked (and didn't work) for me. So I am reposting something I shared on another website. And providing links to a gallery of photos from our river cruise on the Rhine and Mosel rivers and the Rhine & Mosel Rivers travelog shared elsewhere on dgrin.

    Hope this helps someone else!

    As mentioned above, I wanted to keep my overall camera kit relatively light but also have some flexibility as to the kinds of photos I could take. Everyone will have different priorities, and I am just sharing what worked for me.

    Cameras:
    Canon 70D
    Canon Powershot SX260 HS
    iPhone camera

    I rarely used the Canon Powershot, pulling it out in Trier because it was just too wet to use the Canon 70D. I used the iPhone more than the Powershot for casual photos.

    Lenses:
    Canon 28 mm prime (compact, good in low light, great walk around lens)
    Canon 18-135 mm STM lens (moderate zoom lens)
    Canon 10-22 mm (great for wide angle shots of landscapes and buildings)
    Canon 70-300 mm (in case I want to really zoom in on something)

    The lenses I used the most were the 28 mm lens and the 18-135 zoom. I was very glad to have the 10-22 lens with me and used it to photograph some buildings. I rarely used the 70-300 mm lens, but this was partly because it was easier to keep shooting with the 18-135 and crop the photo later than to switch lenses. (An 18-200 mm lens might have been a good compromise.)

    Camera bag:
    Pacsafe Camsafe V8 Anti-theft Camera Shoulder Bag

    I highly recommend the Camsafe camera bag. It helped me carry my camera kit and access everything easily. I could fit the camera and 3 lenses (one on the camera body) inside the case. I carried the small point and shoot camera in one of the side pockets and a bottle of water in the other. There is a pocket on the back of the bag that can easily hold an iPad mini. I used it for the maps and other sheets they gave us for each port ("archiving" the old ones in a clear plastic envelope to bring home with me). I had planned to carry a small Pacsafe purse as well but was able to fit my travel wallet, kleenex, chapstick, extra memory card, extra battery, etc. in the front zippered section of the camera bag.

    What I Didn't Bring
    External flash
    Tripod or monopod

    I did not bother with a tripod or monopod except for a small gorillapod. If the light was very low, I went with a higher ISO and hoped for the best. It might have been nice to have a tripod to take a better photo of the Nijmegen bridge all lit up at night.


    OK, thx for the comments, looks like a fun cruise
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