Screen to print match.

gdmgdm Olympia washingtonRegistered Users Posts: 3 Beginner grinner
What is the suggested LUX level to set my GTI variable intesity viewing box. According to current ISO standards there are two suggested values.. one for critical print matching, evaluation of 2000 LUX +/- 500 LUX and a lower level off 800 LUX for saturation and more general display environment evaluation.

One of Andrew Rodneys on-line videos suggest his box set for 1650 LUX and monitor to 150 CD/m2....

I am curious what other professionals are targeting their viewing booth brightness at in a screen to print match scenario?

Should I be evaluating prints under 1500-2000 LUX and calibrating monitor to match??

GDM

Comments

  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Super Moderators Posts: 22,310 moderator

    Both intensities can be valuable.

    Start with the 2000 Lux to gauge color accuracy for both extremes of the print; i.e. highlights and deep shadows.

    For those prints with important shadow detail also switch to a lower setting to make sure that the print still "makes sense" at more typical viewing illumination levels. Obviously this will matter most with low key and dark, moody subject matter. (Do give your eyes time to acclimate to the different light levels before evaluating.)

    Do also take into account the ultimate display environment, if known.

    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • gdmgdm Olympia washingtonRegistered Users Posts: 3 Beginner grinner
    Understand the value and need to eval under both ISO levels but which are you calibrating your monitor too?

    Thanks for. Your reply.
    GDM
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Super Moderators Posts: 22,310 moderator
    edited February 6, 2017

    That depends upon the monitor, the monitor setup/calibration, the environment around the monitor, the monitor mode (mostly color gamut system and gamut coverage), in some cases video card and driver, and custom ICC profiles. (Probably forgetting some stuff.)

    For any particular system and setup, produce acceptable print calibration solutions first, and viewing conditions appropriate to the calibrated print, then contact the monitor manufacturer on how best to build an environment for the monitor which allows each particular monitor to display in its own best light for the print to monitor comparison. (Buy a high-end Eizo display, like a Eizo ColorEdge CG248-4K 23.8" 4K UHD Hardware Calibration IPS LCD Monitor with Shading Hood or an Eizo ColorEdge CG318-4K 31.1" Widescreen LED Monitor and I guarantee that Eizo will give you great and helpful advice on how to site and light around the monitor.)

    Basically I insist that it's often better to "print by the numbers", sampling "memory colors" in the computer and assigning correct values, then printing to match using appropriate methodology. Human comparison via monitor/display is subject to multiple variables and trying to perfectly match a monitor/display to a print is pretty impossible, due to reflective vs transmissive color systems, and CMYK vs RGB mismatch.

    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
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