DSLR Canon on the market?

all1knewall1knew Beginner grinnerRegistered Users Posts: 7 Big grins

Hello all,

A while back I asked about the point-and-shoot version, and I guess I'm ready to move onto a DSLR style camera.

https://dgrin.com/discussion/257802/what-point-and-shoot-camera-is-best-for-macro-shots#latest

I am not going to be shooting anything outdoors for the most part, and it will only really be used for macro shots (coins and antique pins) in a light booth. Can anyone recommend a good camera body to start with? I would prefer Canon as that's what I've always had and am familiar with them. I would prefer something with image stabilization built in, is that even an option?

Do I continue with a macro lens that has IS as well?

https://www.bestbuy.com/site/canon-ef-100mm-f-2-8l-macro-is-usm-lens-black/9553663.p?skuId=9553663

William Kramer

Comments

  • pathfinderpathfinder Drive By Digital Shooter western IndianaSuper Moderators Posts: 14,523 moderator
    edited November 18, 2017

    Get a camera stand and forgo IS in your macro lens., maybe??

    What is your budget, and how big a file will you need for your final image?

    I shoot Canon too and have no plans to change, but I do like some of the m4/3 macro lenses for close work. Panasonic makes a lovely 45mm f2.8 Leica designed macro-Elmarit lens with image stabilization that I like a great deal - it fits nicely on a Lumix GX7 or GX8 body and will give you stunningly sharp images of coins and stamps and similar small items. The 45mm m4/3 lens is the equivalent of a 90mm macro lens on a full frame 35mm body. The size and weight of the GX7 with the 45mm macro ELmarit is less than 2/3 the size of a 7D and a 105mm macro lens from Canon. A lot easier to handle on a light stand or in a light tent.

    Even with IS, though, a camera stand is the real way to keep your macro work crisp, and a cable release, of course.

    In the Canon world there are 50mm, 60mm, 90mm, 105mm and 180 mm macro lenses either in OEM EOS mounts, or lenses made by Tamron or Sigma. I own a Sigma 150 f2.8 Macro I might even be enticed to sell. It is quite sharp, but I just don't use it that often. For chasing live bugs ( moving targets in other words ) I really like a 180mm macro. But for coins and stamps the 50mm lenses are perfectly adequate and more inexpensive.. Again, what is your budget and what are your needs??

    One other advantage of the m4/3s is the greater depth of field for a given aperture due to the smaller sensor size. For casual images of coins, or buttons, an iPhone or other good cell phone camera with a good stand to hold them will provice very nice images due to their small sensor size as well. Just a thought.

    As for a Canon body, I do like the 5D Mk IV, but for macro work a 70D, an 80D or a 7D or something similar will work very nicely. I am sure you can find nice used ones fairly inexpensively.

    One other thought - I think the 70D or the 80D will be very nice because they have an LCD screen that can be swung about so that you can use live view, AND you can focus the camera and release the shutter by touch on the LCD screen while working in Live View. This is so much easier than trying to crane your neck down so you can see through a viewfinder like you will have to do with a 5D Mk IV. Or even using a right angle finder which I never developed any love for. I have not used the 6D or the 6D II so maybe someone else can describe their advantages or disadvantages.

    The Sony RX 10 Mk IV non-interchangeable lens camera might also work for you, but won't give you the file quality the larger format bodies like the m4/3s or the APS-C bodies, let alone the FF bodies

    Pathfinder - www.pathfinder.smugmug.com

    Moderator of the Technique Forum and Finishing School on Dgrin
  • David_S85David_S85 Spotter of Dgrin Spam and Oddities ChicagolandAdministrators Posts: 12,528 moderator

    You could always pick up a refurb 70D or SL1 here:

    https://www.canonpricewatch.com/canon-refurb-stock-tracker/

    I've bought several bodies and lenses there and have never been disappointed. Refurb=pretty much new. They could be new stock that was taken back by Canon from dealers that couldn't pay their bill, or demo cams that were very lightly used. Every now and then they could actually be brand new but sold there when dealers aren't buying enough. It varies. Some models can be super deals, but you might want to track how the prices change from time to time. And they do - sometimes a lot. They also often have 10-15% off specials 4 times per year. You can set a low price on refurbs and they'll email you automatically when the price falls below a threshold that you set.

    My Smugmug
    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take" - Wayne Gretzky
  • Brett1000Brett1000 Major grins https://www.flickr.com/photos/photoscw/Registered Users Posts: 819 Major grins

    @David_S85 said:
    You could always pick up a refurb 70D or SL1 here:

    https://www.canonpricewatch.com/canon-refurb-stock-tracker/

    I've bought several bodies and lenses there and have never been disappointed. Refurb=pretty much new. They could be new stock that was taken back by Canon from dealers that couldn't pay their bill, or demo cams that were very lightly used. Every now and then they could actually be brand new but sold there when dealers aren't buying enough. It varies. Some models can be super deals, but you might want to track how the prices change from time to time. And they do - sometimes a lot. They also often have 10-15% off specials 4 times per year. You can set a low price on refurbs and they'll email you automatically when the price falls below a threshold that you set.

    I would also recommend buying refurbished, discounted price and includes the regular one year warranty

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