Haleakala summit - as seen from sea level

JonaBeth RussellJonaBeth Russell Major grinsMauiRegistered Users Posts: 1,065 Major grins

As I was chasing turtles on the beach around sunset, the twilight glow on the mountain caught my eye. Situated at a little over 10,000ft, the observatory at the top is part of a global network of space lookery & mapping. There have been a number of new discoveries that were first observed from this very spot.

Shot this on a Sony a7Riii + 100-400GM, hand-held at dusk. Kinda low light, kinda long reach, but still manageable.

Comments

  • black mambablack mamba Major grins Jacksonville, FLRegistered Users Posts: 7,764 Major grins
    edited June 18, 2021

    Nice shot. About how far away from the mountain base are you? It's interesting that you can see so much of the installation at the top.....you sure can't be very close.to the base of the mountain.

    I always wanted to lie naked on a bearskin rug in front of a fireplace. Cracker Barrel didn't take kindly to it.
  • JonaBeth RussellJonaBeth Russell Major grins MauiRegistered Users Posts: 1,065 Major grins

    @black mamba said:
    Nice shot. About how far away from the mountain base are you? It's interesting that you can see so much of the installation at the top.....you sure can't be very close.to the base of the mountain.

    Actually, I'm at the base of the mountain, which you can see on the screenshot below. I'm the blue dot, where the photo was taken, and he summit is the red pin point, roughly 12mi away. Technically speaking, anywhere on the coast is at the base of either this mountain or the west mountain range (which was also a singular big ass volcano long ago). Between the two is a very small valley.

  • black mambablack mamba Major grins Jacksonville, FLRegistered Users Posts: 7,764 Major grins

    Thanks for taking the time to include the ' map". The slope of this mountain is far less severe than I see in the Appalachians. With your history in these parts, you know that if you're at the base of our mountains you can't see much of the top until you get up there as they have a much steeper profile. Thanks to your posts, I've learned quite a bit about Hawaii that I didn't know.

    I always wanted to lie naked on a bearskin rug in front of a fireplace. Cracker Barrel didn't take kindly to it.
  • JonaBeth RussellJonaBeth Russell Major grins MauiRegistered Users Posts: 1,065 Major grins

    @black mamba said:
    Thanks for taking the time to include the ' map". The slope of this mountain is far less severe than I see in the Appalachians. With your history in these parts, you know that if you're at the base of our mountains you can't see much of the top until you get up there as they have a much steeper profile. Thanks to your posts, I've learned quite a bit about Hawaii that I didn't know.

    You're quite right, in that it's very tough to see the tops of the Appalachians. I think a lot of it has to do with how crowded the Appalachian range is. It's hard to get to the base of a tree without another tree blocking your view, much less an entire mountain. Conversely, out here I'm surrounded by mostly water in all directions, and there's not a thing blocking the view of the mountain. On days when there are no clouds, the silly thing looks like it MIGHT be about 5000ft tall, because there's no surrounding dramatic landscape to which I could visually compare. It's very strange for sure, being able to clearly view the summit from sea level.

    I'm not sure about which has steeper slopes, I know the road going up to the summit of the volcano is known to be one of the steepest road ascents in the country, but then again, after years of RV life, I have learned there are countless '-est; -most; -best' things & places in damn near every state!

  • JuanoJuano Major grins Lima, PeruRegistered Users Posts: 4,453 Major grins

    I like it, specially the purple tones above the clouds.

Sign In or Register to comment.