Just people street photos

Yuri PautovYuri Pautov Major grinsRegistered Users Posts: 1,918 Major grins
edited March 17, 2005 in Street and Documentary
Priviet, dear friends.
Want to share with you some street photos:

2022.jpg
This young lady washed my car and it became white as an bride...

2013.jpg
This man sold flower right from his car on the 8 of March -the international women's day (day-off here in Russia).
2026.jpg
This lady foretastes her banana... She had a long walk and decided to take a rest...

2024.jpg
And this is a country man. Man without ages - he might be 25 and 45. He's a stranger here in a city and wants to return to his country as soon as ...
Hope you like these photos,
Spasibo,
Yuri
(some others at http://pautov.viplast.ru)

Comments

  • GatorGator Major grins Registered Users Posts: 192 Major grins
    edited March 10, 2005
    I really love the second shot, the desaturation of everything except those beautiful roses is awesome! The man also is quite expressive! I personally love photos of people that show character (lines, wrinkles, grey hair, etc...) they look so wise. Which is also why I like the last shot, his expression prompts me to ask questions about him. Great shots! clap.gif
  • lynnmalynnma Moddess Emeritus Homosassa, Florida (Paradise)Registered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 5,163
    edited March 10, 2005
    Gator wrote:
    I really love the second shot, the desaturation of everything except those beautiful roses is awesome! The man also is quite expressive! I personally love photos of people that show character (lines, wrinkles, grey hair, etc...) they look so wise. Which is also why I like the last shot, his expression prompts me to ask questions about him. Great shots! clap.gif
    I love them all but my fav also is the man with the roses... it just works so beautifully. clap.gifclap.gif
  • motimoti Big grins Registered Users Posts: 77 Big grins
    edited March 10, 2005
    Yuri,

    These are great photos, the second and the third are my favorites. You really know how to capture the essence of the people thumb.gif

    Spasibo for sharing them with us.

    Cheers
    Moti

  • AngeloAngelo Turning frowns upsidedown Super Moderators Posts: 8,937 moderator
    edited March 10, 2005
    Gator wrote:
    ... I personally love photos of people that show character (lines, wrinkles, grey hair, etc...) they look so wise. Which is also why I like the last shot, his expression prompts me to ask questions about him. Great shots! clap.gif
    yes it's true, we are. rolleyes1.gif

    Yuri - beautiful shots, as always.
  • ginger_55ginger_55 Crazy Creek Babe Registered Users Posts: 8,416 Major grins
    edited March 10, 2005
    Yuri, love the shots and the short descriptions you wrote with them.

    ginger
    After all is said and done, it is the sweet tea.
  • USAIRUSAIR Picking and Grinning Registered Users Posts: 2,646 Major grins
    edited March 10, 2005
    Yuri
    Great photos as alwaysclap.gifclap.gifclap.gifclap.gif
    Really like the expressions in the first and last shots

    Thanks
    Fred
  • KhaosKhaos Mr. Creative Pants Registered Users Posts: 2,435 Major grins
    edited March 10, 2005
    Very beautiful. You show so much with your portraits, thank you. Keep them coming, please.

  • canonguycanonguy Major grins Registered Users Posts: 145 Major grins
    edited March 11, 2005
    Yuri,


    Great photos. You capture the essence of the people well. I feel like I know them.thumb.gif
  • bfjrbfjr Which Way Did They Go Registered Users Posts: 10,980 Major grins
    edited March 12, 2005
    Everything everybody else said + a couple of these thumb.gifthumb

    #2 for me, like the feel, cold & warm in one, great job.
  • 3rdPlanetPhotography3rdPlanetPhotography Banned User Banned Posts: 920 Major grins
    edited March 14, 2005
    How to??
    These are wonderful photos I might add... as a newbie someone please explain: How do you make a shot all B&W and leave one item color like your second photo here.

    2013.jpg

    Thanks
    kc7dji
  • kal151kal151 Just a guy with a camera. Registered Users Posts: 16 Big grins
    edited March 16, 2005
    Good stuff Yuri. clap.gif
    Do it with the camera not the computer.
  • rainforest1155rainforest1155 SmugMug Support Hero Registered Users Posts: 4,542 Major grins
    edited March 16, 2005
    Love your portraits Yuri! thumb.gif
    kc7dji wrote:
    These are wonderful photos I might add... as a newbie someone please explain: How do you make a shot all B&W and leave one item color like your second photo here.
    There are several threads in dgrin about this. Here is one with some more examples and in this one Andy gives a description how he creates these pictures.

    That should get you going. :D
    Sebastian
    Sebastian
    SmugMug Support Hero
  • ruttrutt Cave canem! Registered Users Posts: 6,511 Major grins
    edited March 16, 2005
    These are all very nice, but I almost always find selective color very distracting and this is no exception.

    2013.jpg

    I think this is a wonderful shot and could stand on it's own in B&W or (maybe better) color. I haven't seen the color, but I'll bet that the roses stand out perfectly well against the drab background. All you have done here is exagerated this to the maximum extreme. Wouldn't the statement be more effective with uniform saturation? Also, for me, the real focus of this shot is the wonderful face. The color roses distract from this.

    Take this criticism for what it's worth. I've seen exactly 2 selective color shots on dgrin in more than a year that I thought were OK. One was Andy's woman with the color strawberry, which I grudgingly have to admit stuck in my mind and so got promotted above the level of being just a gimmick. And the other was amc's "Lost Souls": http://www.dgrin.com/showthread.php?t=7597 which I thought made sense the minute I saw it.

    Look, it's all too easy to look at a shot and decide that one element is more alive, less drab, whatever than the rest and make it color. This is kind of a digital photography fad. It has the advantage that you can do it all in post. Selective focus requires you to make the decision while shooting and quickly. For the most part, I think selective color was cool the first few times anyone did it, but now it's a gimmick, a joke that we've heard before.

    What does work really well is a much more subtle cousin of selective color. As your image shows, the more saturated a color is, the more it seems to come forward out of the picture. In this case the roses seem to have been cut out and held up in front of the background. This is a basic color fact: greater saturation seems closer. So a classic trick is to make objects seem rounder by slightly desaturating their edges (perhaps with some sort of plate blending.) My guess is that the natural color of this shot would accomplish this. The roses have to be a lot more colorful than the man or background. But you could slightly accentuate this with plate blending or with the mask you already have. Try taking it just far enough to make the roses jump, but not far enough to look unnatural. Better?

    Uri, I love your work. You've just fallen into one of my pet peeves. Perhaps in Russia, you seen as much meaningless use of selective color as we have here.
    If not now, when?
  • AngeloAngelo Turning frowns upsidedown Super Moderators Posts: 8,937 moderator
    edited March 16, 2005
    rutt wrote:
    These are all very nice, but I almost always find selective color very distracting and this is no exception.

    2013.jpg

    I think this is a wonderful shot and could stand on it's own in B&W or (maybe better) color. I haven't seen the color, but I'll bet that the roses stand out perfectly well against the drab background. All you have done here is exagerated this to the maximum extreme. Wouldn't the statement be more effective with uniform saturation? Also, for me, the real focus of this shot is the wonderful face. The color roses distract from this.

    Take this criticism for what it's worth. I've seen exactly 2 selective color shots on dgrin in more than a year that I thought were OK. One was Andy's woman with the color strawberry, which I grudgingly have to admit stuck in my mind and so got promotted above the level of being just a gimmick. And the other was amc's "Lost Souls": http://www.dgrin.com/showthread.php?t=7597 which I thought made sense the minute I saw it.

    Look, it's all too easy to look at a shot and decide that one element is more alive, less drab, whatever than the rest and make it color. This is kind of a digital photography fad. It has the advantage that you can do it all in post. Selective focus requires you to make the decision while shooting and quickly. For the most part, I think selective color was cool the first few times anyone did it, but now it's a gimmick, a joke that we've heard before.

    What does work really well is a much more subtle cousin of selective color. As your image shows, the more saturated a color is, the more it seems to come forward out of the picture. In this case the roses seem to have been cut out and held up in front of the background. This is a basic color fact: greater saturation seems closer. So a classic trick is to make objects seem rounder by slightly desaturating their edges (perhaps with some sort of plate blending.) My guess is that the natural color of this shot would accomplish this. The roses have to be a lot more colorful than the man or background. But you could slightly accentuate this with plate blending or with the mask you already have. Try taking it just far enough to make the roses jump, but not far enough to look unnatural. Better?

    Uri, I love your work. You've just fallen into one of my pet peeves. Perhaps in Russia, you seen as much meaningless use of selective color as we have here.
    Rutt: You pose a very convincing argument and I bet you're absolutely correct about the original picture. Might be nice to see; Yuri?
  • Thiago SigristThiago Sigrist Major grins Registered Users Posts: 336 Major grins
    edited March 16, 2005
    Excellent work, Yuri!
    Hi again, my friend! :-)

    What strikes me more about your work is that you seem to know exactly how close to get to those people in order to depict the scene as you intend it to appear, or to convey a certain mood.

    Both the B&Ws and the color pictures look great, I really can't pick my favourite here, they're all great!

    Thanks so much for sharing!
    Take care!

    -- thiago
  • Yuri PautovYuri Pautov Major grins Registered Users Posts: 1,918 Major grins
    edited March 16, 2005
    answer to rutt
    rutt wrote:
    These are all very nice, but I almost always find selective color very distracting and this is no exception.

    2013.jpg

    I think this is a wonderful shot and could stand on it's own in B&W or (maybe better) color. I haven't seen the color, but I'll bet that the roses stand out perfectly well against the drab background. All you have done here is exagerated this to the maximum extreme. Wouldn't the statement be more effective with uniform saturation? Also, for me, the real focus of this shot is the wonderful face. The color roses distract from this.

    Take this criticism for what it's worth. I've seen exactly 2 selective color shots on dgrin in more than a year that I thought were OK. One was Andy's woman with the color strawberry, which I grudgingly have to admit stuck in my mind and so got promotted above the level of being just a gimmick. And the other was amc's "Lost Souls": http://www.dgrin.com/showthread.php?t=7597 which I thought made sense the minute I saw it.

    Look, it's all too easy to look at a shot and decide that one element is more alive, less drab, whatever than the rest and make it color. This is kind of a digital photography fad. It has the advantage that you can do it all in post. Selective focus requires you to make the decision while shooting and quickly. For the most part, I think selective color was cool the first few times anyone did it, but now it's a gimmick, a joke that we've heard before.

    What does work really well is a much more subtle cousin of selective color. As your image shows, the more saturated a color is, the more it seems to come forward out of the picture. In this case the roses seem to have been cut out and held up in front of the background. This is a basic color fact: greater saturation seems closer. So a classic trick is to make objects seem rounder by slightly desaturating their edges (perhaps with some sort of plate blending.) My guess is that the natural color of this shot would accomplish this. The roses have to be a lot more colorful than the man or background. But you could slightly accentuate this with plate blending or with the mask you already have. Try taking it just far enough to make the roses jump, but not far enough to look unnatural. Better?

    Uri, I love your work. You've just fallen into one of my pet peeves. Perhaps in Russia, you seen as much meaningless use of selective color as we have here.
    Spasibo for your critique, rutt.
    Sorry I have not much time now -
    so
    1) By this composition I wanter to underline the difference between the real attitude to women and attitude at 8 of March - international women's day. Distance between the b&w and color must underline this.
    As for such photos, look at my:









    488.jpg
  • ruttrutt Cave canem! Registered Users Posts: 6,511 Major grins
    edited March 16, 2005
    What can I say, Uri? These are beautiful images; I wish I'd taken them. But the selective color really ruins them for me. It's just so unsubtle, such a cheap trick, so much of a fad. If you were the one who invented it, well then, it would be like Man Ray's experimentations. But your shots don't need it to make their point. Really.

    Anyway, as I said, this advice is worth what you paid for it. The photography is beautiful. I just have to try to ignore gimmick.
    If not now, when?
  • ruttrutt Cave canem! Registered Users Posts: 6,511 Major grins
    edited March 16, 2005
    rutt wrote:
    What can I say, Uri? These are beautiful images; I wish I'd taken them. But the selective color really ruins them for me. It's just so unsubtle, such a cheap trick, so much of a fad. If you were the one who invented it, well then, it would be like Man Ray's experimentations. But your shots don't need it to make their point. Really.

    Anyway, as I said, this advice is worth what you paid for it. The photography is beautiful. I just have to try to ignore gimmick.
    Maybe you did invent it?
    If not now, when?
  • wxwaxwxwax Immoderator Registered Users Posts: 15,471 Major grins
    edited March 16, 2005
    Yuri, I really enjoy looking at your portraits/people shots.

    Some of things that I admire are down to your talent - great expressions, composition and lighting.

    On the first and fourth photos, however, I really notice how sharp are their faces. Is that the result of post processing? I remember you wrote about a technique you've been trying. Are these examples of it?

    I also admire your B&W conversions. Would you mind explaining your technique a little?

    Thanks.
    Sid.
    Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabis, ad caput tuum saxum immane mittam
    http://www.mcneel.com/users/jb/foghorn/ill_shut_up.au
  • Yuri PautovYuri Pautov Major grins Registered Users Posts: 1,918 Major grins
    edited March 16, 2005
    Answer to rutt #2
    rutt wrote:
    Maybe you did invent it?
    Again 'bolshoe spasibo' (in Russian - Thank you very much) for your critique and explaining of your point of view - I understand you and I know how difficult it is to change the point of view of other people ... :-) You must be right - I also think that using such a trick is a sign of bad form... but...
    I couldn't find *another tool* here to underline my thought about women's day. Maybe it's too Russian...
    1) These are not roses - but tulips - main flowers which our men present to our women on the 8 of march.
    2) Man of such nationality (they are called here 'Person (in Russian lico - 'the face') of Caucasian nationality') is associated with selling of flowers.
    3) One of the wishes to women on the 8 of March - wish that men will treat them the same way they do on that day :-)
    4) As you see the square of color here is very small, but attractive
    5) A b&w picture is not so happy - bad weather, no buyers, tiredness of the man...
    6) Distance/ difference between the b&w and color (AS I THOUGHT) must provoke subconscious feeling of incommensurableness (foo, what a word!).... That's was my aim here...
    7) Acccording to your critique, I riched that feeling somehow, but 'you are not Russian enough' to understand the rest :-)
    Again, I'm sorry, maybe its too national... and I must not post this photo here...
    Again thanks a lot for your very helpful critique!
    I'll try not to forget to post color version here...
    Yuri
  • Yuri PautovYuri Pautov Major grins Registered Users Posts: 1,918 Major grins
    edited March 16, 2005
    Answer to Sid
    wxwax wrote:
    Yuri, I really enjoy looking at your portraits/people shots.

    Some of things that I admire are down to your talent - great expressions, composition and lighting.

    On the first and fourth photos, however, I really notice how sharp are their faces. Is that the result of post processing? I remember you wrote about a technique you've been trying. Are these examples of it?

    I also admire your B&W conversions. Would you mind explaining your technique a little?

    Thanks.
    Spasibo for your comments and kindest words.
    I use one of 'Andy's' (C) techniques:
    Channel mixer / monochrome /50/50/0

    Yuri
  • wxwaxwxwax Immoderator Registered Users Posts: 15,471 Major grins
    edited March 17, 2005
    Spasibo for your comments and kindest words.
    I use one of 'Andy's' (C) techniques:
    Channel mixer / monochrome /50/50/0

    Yuri
    Thanks Yuri! thumb.gif
    Sid.
    Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabis, ad caput tuum saxum immane mittam
    http://www.mcneel.com/users/jb/foghorn/ill_shut_up.au
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