UV Haze filter....which is best buy?

Kevin CTMPKevin CTMP Kevin CTMPPosts: 81Registered Users Big grins
edited September 30, 2010 in Accessories
I used to think that buying any generic UV haze filter to add to the lens for protection was sufficient, but I've been told by other colleagues that I should invest in a better filter.....especially if I want to get the best picture from an L series lens....unfortunately, i'm not really sure what the difference is between the $10 sunpak filters (which is what I have now) and the filters that cost a LOT more than that!.....can anyone suggest and decent UV haze filters that will not break the bank?....i'm willing to pay a little more....But I can't afford to be spend a $100 for a filter......are there any particular brands that are better or that I should stay away from?....sunpak, hoya, tiffen, B+W, Canon, Heliopan?

Comments

  • cmasoncmason Old dog, new tricks Raleigh, NCPosts: 2,503Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 13, 2010
    B+W F-pro, is all I use. B+W and Heliopan use exceptional glass in all their filters. Sunpack, tiffen, canon, use generic glass. hoya uses generic in their basic lines, but the S-HMC lines are quite good. So quality recommended: B+W and Heliopan, without reservation. Hoya with S-HMC, and then, nothing else. YMMV
  • Herman AuerHerman Auer Major grins Posts: 329Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 16, 2010
    Kevin, I also recommend B+W filters. The F-Pro series is multi resistant coated (mrc). They are available in standard or slim versions.
    Another manufacturer worth considering is HOYA. They have the Pro1 series filter which is good too.
    Woulden't take the cheapest as you stand the chance of degrading your lens qualities.

    Cheers - Herman
    My motto: To learn more today, than I knew yesterday!

    Nikon gear & some lenses.
  • racerracer Major grins Posts: 333Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 16, 2010
    All glass has optical abberations, no glass if perfect, and they all have these issues. You buy those expensive L lenses because they have less abberations, meaning the glass is better quality and gives a better quality image. The cheaper quality lenses have more abberations, meaning worse image quality. The more glass you add to a lens, the more abberations you are adding. So, the cheaper quality filters are usually of poor quality glass, meaning they add more abberations, degrading image quality. The more expensive higher quality filters, (just like the glass in a high quality "L" lens) have less abberations, so degrade image quality less.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optical_aberration
    A true multi coated filter might do away with even more errors leading to better image quality. When it comes to filters, usually the more you pay the better the quality (but not always).
    I use Sigma filters, because they seem to be good quality, are multi coated, and cost around $40-$60. I cant tell any difference between the Sigma and more expensive B+W filters (but that might just be me)
    Todd - My Photos
  • insanefredinsanefred Disgruntled Photographer Posts: 628Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 17, 2010
    So far the out of all the UV/Protector filters I've tried. Hoya HD seems to be the best. In fact, I would say a tad better than my Nikon NC filter.
  • run_kmcrun_kmc Olympus! Posts: 263Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 17, 2010
    Go with Hoya or B+W.

    That said, I've found that lens hoods provide far more protection than filters.
  • Art ScottArt Scott Have PASSPORT will TRAVEL Posts: 8,957Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 17, 2010
    I started out using filters on every lens until I had a mishap with a lens and it was the filter that damaged the lens not what broke the filter.........
    a thing to remevmber is if something pusing into the filter and breaks it, then that broken glass is going to hit and slide across the lens below it
    and very possibly scratch (at the very least), and put pits on the glass also.........if this filter is too keep dust off...the buy a good blower and brush....
    I have never used another filter....so I have been filter free for over 25 yrs.......and not one of my lenses have every gotten a scratch on the glass.....
    lens hoods get banged and broken but never has a lens been damaged from dust or anything else and if you use good quality lens cleaning tissue,
    I use only Zeiss Cleaning Tissues bought at Optometry Dept at WalMart, now used to buy at local Optometrist but found a t W-Mart and tons cheaper,
    I also have a blower ,brush and micro fiber cloth for cleaning............

    The Zeiss cloths are pre wetted and also they will not damage an uncoated plastic eye glass lens then they will not damage the element of a coated lens,
    if used properly.



    I also self clean my sensor filter using the Copper Hill Method............................


    I believe it was BALDY that on one of these filter threads also mention he had not used a filter in as many years as I have not used a filter.......

    One last thought....if you decide you MUST have a filter....make dang sure the metal is not aluminum...it will over time self seize to your lens threads
    and you may have to damage it to get it loose........the metal part must be brass to keep it from seizing .................

    Have a great weekend........................
    "Genuine Fractals was, is and will always be the best solution for enlarging digital photos." ....Vincent Versace ... ... COPYRIGHT YOUR WORK ONLINE ... ... My Website

    A ZENFOLIO 10% Discount Coupon CODE - A8K-Q2K-VPG
  • run_kmcrun_kmc Olympus! Posts: 263Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 17, 2010
    Good points, Art.

    It seems that I've heard more stories about people getting filters stuck on lenses than stories about filters saving lenses.
  • racerracer Major grins Posts: 333Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 17, 2010
    ^^ I got a wide angle lens with a polarizer that seems to be permently stuck (I think the threads got crossed). Instead of using a polarizer on my lens, I just use the lens with the polarizer ne_nau.gif

    I hardle ever use a filter for protection (I find a windy day at the beach is a good time to use one), but I do use the filters for there intended purpose. Contrary to what everyone uses them for, UV filters ARE made to block out UV light, not really for protection. I really dont use the UV filters though (do they even make that much of a difference?), but polarizing and neutral density filters definantly come in handy!

    Just be very careful when you screw them on, NEVER EVER use force, or you might end up with a filter permanantly attached, and never screw them on tight, as it might be really tough to get off again
    Todd - My Photos
  • Art ScottArt Scott Have PASSPORT will TRAVEL Posts: 8,957Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 17, 2010
    If you have got to use filters and many of us do or we could not get the shot.............
    the way we want it....ND and CPL and a host of others...you should look into a system like,
    but not necessarily cokin brand......Lee and Singh-Ray and a few others make fantastic flat rectangle (and square)
    filter systems.......you can use the less expensive cokin connectors and adapters and then use the
    more expensive holders.......most of this holder and the adapter/connectors are plastic and will not
    self seize to the lens threads.....plus if you buy the largest filter you will need for your UWA that
    filter can be hand held also for use with other lenses or you can buy the adapter/connectors for
    all your lenses cheaper than one filter for each lens................I really prefer a flat rectangle filter
    over any screw in filter................
    "Genuine Fractals was, is and will always be the best solution for enlarging digital photos." ....Vincent Versace ... ... COPYRIGHT YOUR WORK ONLINE ... ... My Website

    A ZENFOLIO 10% Discount Coupon CODE - A8K-Q2K-VPG
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Posts: 18,667Super Moderators moderator
    edited September 17, 2010
    For those with stuck filters, you can get a filter wrench that will help remove the filters.

    If you don't have a filter wrench and if the stuck filter has front threads, add an additional filter and you can use several (or one very large) automotive screw/band hose clamp to remove the filters. Clamp onto the filters tightly and then use a small hammer to tap on the hose clamp in the direction proper to loosen the filters. (The use of the second filter just makes it easier to evenly clamp the stuck filter.) The stuck filter should loosen up pretty easily and the use of several hose clamps makes it easier to grab/turn the assembly too.

    Take care not to clamp onto the lens, just the filters.

    The hose clamps may scuff the stuck filter a little if you have to apply a lot of torque and if the clamp slips. C'est la vie. Once a filter has been stuck, I don't trust it anymore so it's expendable.
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • Glenn NKGlenn NK Major grins Posts: 268Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 18, 2010
    I've had a few panic moments with stuck filters. I finally realized that when the filter was put on, it was relatively cool (the rims are aluminum with a high coefficient of expansion). Whenever I was taking one off, I had been handling the camera, and the filter was warm from my hands (so it expanded relative to the lens body).

    Now, I let the lens/filter cool off (obviously sitting in the sun won't help), and find that removing the filter is easier.

    Of course, one trick is to not crank it on too hard in the first place.

    Back on topic. I only buy filters if they are made in Germany. B + W are, as are Rodenstock.

    G
    "There is nothing that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and he who considers price only is that man’s lawful prey". John Ruskin 1819 - 1900
  • insanefredinsanefred Disgruntled Photographer Posts: 628Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 18, 2010
    463057157_bgsb3-L-2.jpg

    $40 hoya filter saved my Nikon 70-200 2.8. It was a rental and I did not have insurance.
  • Glenn NKGlenn NK Major grins Posts: 268Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 19, 2010
    A broken filter (looking at Fred's) would be a nightmare.

    My first line of protection isn't a filter, but always using a lens hood. The filter is there for backup.

    G
    "There is nothing that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and he who considers price only is that man’s lawful prey". John Ruskin 1819 - 1900
  • insanefredinsanefred Disgruntled Photographer Posts: 628Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 19, 2010
    Glenn NK wrote: »
    A broken filter (looking at Fred's) would be a nightmare.

    My first line of protection isn't a filter, but always using a lens hood. The filter is there for backup.

    G


    Hoods provide no protection against direct impact like a bb gun.
  • cmasoncmason Old dog, new tricks Raleigh, NCPosts: 2,503Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 19, 2010
    B+W and Heliopan filter rings are made of brass, because brass does not suffer as much shrinking and swelling due to temp. Never had a stuck filter.
  • racerracer Major grins Posts: 333Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 19, 2010
    insanefred wrote: »
    Hoods provide no protection against direct impact like a bb gun.

    maybe its my lack of experience, but I have never worried that a stray bb is going to come out of nowere and break my lens headscratch.gif But if that is something to worry about, I think I would be more worried about my eye getting shot out then the lens ne_nau.gif
    Todd - My Photos
  • Kevin CTMPKevin CTMP Kevin CTMP Posts: 81Registered Users Big grins
    edited September 24, 2010
    Thanks for all of the input everyone, I decided to go with a few BW filters, and I also always leave a lens hood on for that added protection.
  • colourboxcolourbox Major grins Posts: 2,052Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 25, 2010
    racer wrote: »
    Contrary to what everyone uses them for, UV filters ARE made to block out UV light, not really for protection.

    I thought I heard that digital SLRs don't need UV filters because there's a UV filter at the sensor. Is there any truth to this?

    (I stopped using filters for protection, I'm gambling on lens hood protection instead of adding another layer of glass)
  • InsuredDisasterInsuredDisaster White Ghost Posts: 1,132Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 25, 2010
    I just take the filter off when it causes problems. Had my D300 with a Sigma 10-20 attached to a scooter and then crashed the thing on the camera size. The filter was absolutely smashed to pieces and badly bent up. The lens isn't quite as good as new but still works pretty darn well. The camera had no damage that I could see.
  • DsrtVWDsrtVW Light Stalking Posts: 1,990Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 30, 2010
    Another good trick for stuck filters is a rubber O ring that is narrow enough to cover the filter will give you much more gripping power and will not damage the finish. As long as it is not crossthreaded then you might need the hose clamp. I only use effects filters do not use UV for protection but always use my hoods
    Chris K. NANPA Member
    http://kadvantage.smugmug.com/
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