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slides to digital CD ?

gypsy77360gypsy77360 Registered Users Posts: 65 Big grins
edited July 6, 2004 in Technique
I recently acquired a number of 50 year old 35mm slides . How is the easiest way to get them converted to digital CD. I do not own a scanner. Any commercial sites someone could recommend ? Thanks. :scratch

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    mercphotomercphoto Registered Users Posts: 4,550 Major grins
    edited July 2, 2004
    Scanning slides
    gypsy77360 wrote:
    I recently acquired a number of 50 year old 35mm slides . How is the easiest way to get them converted to digital CD. I do not own a scanner. Any commercial sites someone could recommend ? Thanks. headscratch.gif

    I know Precision Camera (percision-camera.com, Austin TX) can do the job for you. I do not know if they are expensive or cheap because I don't know what others charge. However, they are a great store and know what they are doing. I buy my lenses from them, pay more than from mail order, and feel I get my money's worth anyway.

    For slides, do at least 2,000 dpi (which works out to 6 million pixels). If you can, go higher still, as a good slide will have more information in it than 6 million pixles.
    Bill Jurasz - Mercury Photography - Cedar Park, TX
    A former sports shooter
    Follow me at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bjurasz/
    My Etsy store: https://www.etsy.com/shop/mercphoto?ref=hdr_shop_menu
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    pathfinderpathfinder Super Moderators Posts: 14,698 moderator
    edited July 2, 2004
    gypsy77360 wrote:
    I recently acquired a number of 50 year old 35mm slides . How is the easiest way to get them converted to digital CD. I do not own a scanner. Any commercial sites someone could recommend ? Thanks. headscratch.gif
    Rather than repeating a lot of what has been discussed before - here is a link to an extensive previous discussion of this topic. ( The short answer is that is is easier to hire your local photo shop if you are not really interested in quality work - but that you can do much better yourself if you invest the time and energy to learn how to scan well and spend the money for a good slide scanner or even one of Epson new flabed scanners. I am sure you can hire GOOD scans from commercail custom color shops, but I bet you can buy a good scanner for a lot less money if you have over 300 slides to scan which is a farily small family slide collection) I scanned my father's slide collection beginning in 2000, and it takes a fair investment of time - figure 10 minutes per slide if you are fast.

    Here is the link http://www.dgrin.com/showthread.php?t=824&highlight=scanning+slides
    Pathfinder - www.pathfinder.smugmug.com

    Moderator of the Technique Forum and Finishing School on Dgrin
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    mercphotomercphoto Registered Users Posts: 4,550 Major grins
    edited July 2, 2004
    Scanning slides
    pathfinder wrote:
    ( The short answer is that is is easier to hire your local photo shop if you are not really interested in quality work - but that you can do much better yourself

    Interesting link and neat stuff about scanning slides. One question about your comment above, if your local photo shop is a store that caters to professionals (even large format film processing) does the above still hold true? The shop I recommended, Precision Camera, isn't the level of a Wolf Camera.
    Bill Jurasz - Mercury Photography - Cedar Park, TX
    A former sports shooter
    Follow me at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bjurasz/
    My Etsy store: https://www.etsy.com/shop/mercphoto?ref=hdr_shop_menu
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    Shay StephensShay Stephens Registered Users Posts: 3,165 Major grins
    edited July 2, 2004
    gypsy77360 wrote:
    I recently acquired a number of 50 year old 35mm slides . How is the easiest way to get them converted to digital CD. I do not own a scanner. Any commercial sites someone could recommend ? Thanks. headscratch.gif
    http://www.chromedigital.com/promo4.html

    The time needed to scan on your own is prohibitive to actually ever finishing ;-) I recommend sending it out to be done if you want the job finished before the end the century hehehe.
    Creator of Dgrin's "Last Photographer Standing" contest
    "Failure is feedback. And feedback is the breakfast of champions." - fortune cookie
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    pathfinderpathfinder Super Moderators Posts: 14,698 moderator
    edited July 2, 2004
    http://www.chromedigital.com/promo4.html

    The time needed to scan on your own is prohibitive to actually ever finishing ;-) I recommend sending it out to be done if you want the job finished before the end the century hehehe.
    You are correct about scanning slides yourself - I've scanned hundreds and hundreds -
    I said figure at least 10 minutes per slide if you are FAST and KNOW what you are doing! There is a bit of a learning curve... - otherwise maybe two or three per hour. If you have many slide it can take days and days - just like you are pointing out Shay. But custom scanning I bet will not be cheap either, and my experience with having slides scanned to CD by my local photofinisher was money thrown down the drain - their quality did not begin to approach the very worst of mine. Depends on whether the critical variable is time or money or quality I guess.lickout.gif
    Pathfinder - www.pathfinder.smugmug.com

    Moderator of the Technique Forum and Finishing School on Dgrin
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    gypsy77360gypsy77360 Registered Users Posts: 65 Big grins
    edited July 3, 2004
    thanks
    Thanks for the info.It seems like the $0.65 price from Chrome will suffice for scanning all the collection with upgrades for the individual slides that proof out for enlargement/print.
    I noticed that many slides when seen thru a hand-held viewer reveal lots of dust , lint , etc. What is the best way to prepare /clean them prior to remitting them to shop for scan ?
    Thanks ,
    gypsy
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    Steve LearSteve Lear Registered Users Posts: 52 Big grins
    edited July 4, 2004
    Lunar problems
    Watching the moon sinking was a spectacular site. I took a range of shots with different exposures, but couldn't seem to get the moon details without loosing detail in the rest of the landscape. Is there a trick to it or is this just a fact of photographic life.

    Any help here would be much appreciated.

    Thanks, Steve.

    5702660-M.jpg

    5702656-M.jpg
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    Shay StephensShay Stephens Registered Users Posts: 3,165 Major grins
    edited July 5, 2004
    Steve Lear wrote:
    Watching the moon sinking was a spectacular site. I took a range of shots with different exposures, but couldn't seem to get the moon details without loosing detail in the rest of the landscape. Is there a trick to it or is this just a fact of photographic life.

    Any help here would be much appreciated.

    Thanks, Steve.
    The moon is fully lit by sunlight, while the landscape is only partially lit. The moon is therefore much brighter than the landscape and is loosing detail to the overexposure. You could try a large 4 or 5 stop bracketed shot, shoot one for the landscape and then another for the moon.

    You could also try to use a graduated ND filter, but they typically top out at three stops. If you shot an average exposure in RAW, you could probably process the shot to look right.

    But either way you slice it, it is a tricky situation that will be hard to do, though not impossible.
    Creator of Dgrin's "Last Photographer Standing" contest
    "Failure is feedback. And feedback is the breakfast of champions." - fortune cookie
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    Steve LearSteve Lear Registered Users Posts: 52 Big grins
    edited July 6, 2004
    The moon is fully lit by sunlight, while the landscape is only partially lit. The moon is therefore much brighter than the landscape and is loosing detail to the overexposure. You could try a large 4 or 5 stop bracketed shot, shoot one for the landscape and then another for the moon.

    You could also try to use a graduated ND filter, but they typically top out at three stops. If you shot an average exposure in RAW, you could probably process the shot to look right.

    But either way you slice it, it is a tricky situation that will be hard to do, though not impossible.
    Thanks for the info Shay, much appreciated.
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