Which monitor?

tmlphototmlphoto Looking for sweet light!Posts: 1,444Registered Users Major grins
edited July 28, 2004 in Digital Darkroom
My present monitor, NEC Multisync LCD 1500M, seems to be dying (horizontal dark lines that won't go away). I would really like to replace it with a high quality LCD monitor, but I am concerned about consistent prints when tweaking on an LCD monitor. Brightness and contrast seem to change alot with different viewing angles, although I have done pretty well with my present monitor. Because of desk space issues I really would like to use another LCD. I have read that you need a CRT monitor if you are really serious about getting consistently accurate prints. Any thoughts?
Thomas :D

TML Photography
tmlphoto.com

Comments

  • BodwickBodwick Odd Bod... Posts: 396Registered Users Major grins
    edited July 6, 2004
    CRT monitors
    When you start looking at monitors as with printers and camera's it is a choice of what can you afford and how much do you want to pay. Unlike a lens say, is it worth the extra for what it does? A good lens gives much better final results than using a good monitor to fix shots through a cheaper lens.

    Your points about CRT. My main monitor is a Sony Color Reference System 21" CRT with 19.8" viewable. It comes with Sony calibration sytem and can be set up to match my printer or any other third party printer once calibrated. This comes at a price and unless you are into large format printing or have a good reason to need a high quality monitor I would say you can get away with a far cheaper option and never notice the difference. As long as you buy carefully. Do some research on whats about at the moment.
    You do get exactly what you see on screen out from the printer. As you should. It's also a great monitor. As it should be. Costs about $1500 in the USA after a quick search, is it worth it? To me yes, to you?

    Spend your money on a good printer, upgrade your computer, or buy a good lens and once all your gear is eventualy paid for then get the expensive monitor. Of course you may want to buy a good monitor and build your system round that. Your choice.....Hope thats helpfull...




    Bod.

    Or you could buy a load of extra memory, backup batteries, portable storage, flash bla bla bla bla.......











    tmlphoto wrote:
    My present monitor, NEC Multisync LCD 1500M, seems to be dying (horizontal dark lines that won't go away). I would really like to replace it with a high quality LCD monitor, but I am concerned about consistent prints when tweaking on an LCD monitor. Brightness and contrast seem to change alot with different viewing angles, although I have done pretty well with my present monitor. Because of desk space issues I really would like to use another LCD. I have read that you need a CRT monitor if you are really serious about getting consistently accurate prints. Any thoughts?
    "The important thing is to just take the picture with the lens you have when the picture happens."
    Jerry Lodriguss - Sports Photographer

    Reporters sans frontières
  • BodwickBodwick Odd Bod... Posts: 396Registered Users Major grins
    edited July 6, 2004
    I forgot to mention it sits on your desk at 39kg....

    Not so good if your short of space..


    Bod.
    "The important thing is to just take the picture with the lens you have when the picture happens."
    Jerry Lodriguss - Sports Photographer

    Reporters sans frontières
  • tmlphototmlphoto Looking for sweet light! Posts: 1,444Registered Users Major grins
    edited July 10, 2004
    Bodwick wrote:
    I forgot to mention it sits on your desk at 39kg....

    Not so good if your short of space..


    Bod.
    Thanks for the advice. It looks like I have some homework to do.
    Thomas :D

    TML Photography
    tmlphoto.com
  • BaldyBaldy SmugMug co-founder Posts: 2,853Administrators moderator
    edited July 11, 2004
    I've heard the opinion several times on Digital Grin that if you're serious, you need to use a CRT. But I love the Apple Cinema displays and many an ultra-high end photographer uses them.

    Here's a pretty good review that considers them the Bentley of color management monitors:

    http://www.flatbed-scanner-review.org/color_management_ICC_profiles/Radius_Miro_displays_color.html
  • DoctorItDoctorIt vrooom! Posts: 11,940Administrators moderator
    edited July 12, 2004
    Baldy wrote:
    I've heard the opinion several times on Digital Grin that if you're serious, you need to use a CRT. But I love the Apple Cinema displays and many an ultra-high end photographer uses them.

    Here's a pretty good review that considers them the Bentley of color management monitors:
    Gorgeous, yeah, I go drool over them frequently on lunch breaks down at the campus computer shop. But you need to be on a "Bentley" salary to afford them.
    Erik
    moderator of: The Flea Market [ guidelines ]

  • DoctorItDoctorIt vrooom! Posts: 11,940Administrators moderator
    edited July 12, 2004
    Forgot why I replied in the first place... Again, you mentioned you want to save space, but if you want really high quality pics, you want a tube. I think more than one member of this list use the LaCie Electron Blue 19" or 21". I've looked at them, they are beautiful and can be had for under $500 if the 19" is enough for you. LaCie often has factory reconditioned units right on their website.

    Ask wxwax, he got one not too long ago...
    Erik
    moderator of: The Flea Market [ guidelines ]

  • tmlphototmlphoto Looking for sweet light! Posts: 1,444Registered Users Major grins
    edited July 12, 2004
    DoctorIt wrote:
    Forgot why I replied in the first place... Again, you mentioned you want to save space, but if you want really high quality pics, you want a tube. I think more than one member of this list use the LaCie Electron Blue 19" or 21". I've looked at them, they are beautiful and can be had for under $500 if the 19" is enough for you. LaCie often has factory reconditioned units right on their website.

    Ask wxwax, he got one not too long ago...
    The LaCie monitors look really cool. I really need to go with an LCD if at all possible. Do the Lacie LCD have a great reputation like the CRTs. I'm PC all the way, so I don't think the Apple monitors are a real option. (They don't work with a PC do they?)
    Thomas :D

    TML Photography
    tmlphoto.com
  • patch29patch29 C|34N3R Atlanta, GAPosts: 2,928Registered Users, Retired Mod Major grins
    edited July 12, 2004
    tmlphoto wrote:
    I'm PC all the way, so I don't think the Apple monitors are a real option. (They don't work with a PC do they?)

    The new ones work with DVI, so they are PC compatible.
    The DVI connectors on PowerBooks and other graphics cards sold by Apple support a “single link” DVI signal, suitable for driving the 23-inch Apple Cinema HD Display or 20-inch Apple Cinema Display. And this DVI connection removes all barriers to using an Apple display with a PC. So long as your graphics card supports DVI with DDC technology for widescreen viewing, you should be able to use these Apple displays with a PC.

    More here.
  • mercphotomercphoto Bill Jurasz Posts: 4,550Registered Users Major grins
    edited July 27, 2004
    My monitor choicies
    I want to bring up this thread again. I have a first-generation Apple 12" G4 PowerBook. This has an analog VGA output, not DVI. It supports a max of 1600 x 1200 external display (if memory serves). The Cinema Displays aren't really an option for me. From what I know of LCD's you want to run them at their native resolution, and my PowerBook can't drive that. Plus I would need a DVI converter, also not ideal.

    So I'm thinking of non-Apple LCD, or a CRT. I'm thinking 17" or 19". Must be analog VGA. Any suggestions?

    Or, how about this: get an eMac, with the 17" flat CRT, the big hard disk, and the Super Drive (that I really wish my PowerBook had). For a grand I'd get a faster CPU/system bus, the monitor, and the Super Drive, all in one package. Decent idea?
    Bill Jurasz - Mercury Photography - Cedar Park, TX
    A former sports shooter
    Follow me at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bjurasz/
    My Etsy store: https://www.etsy.com/shop/mercphoto?ref=hdr_shop_menu
  • BodwickBodwick Odd Bod... Posts: 396Registered Users Major grins
    edited July 27, 2004
    mercphoto wrote:
    Decent idea?
    Yes.......
    "The important thing is to just take the picture with the lens you have when the picture happens."
    Jerry Lodriguss - Sports Photographer

    Reporters sans frontières
  • DoctorItDoctorIt vrooom! Posts: 11,940Administrators moderator
    edited July 28, 2004
    mercphoto wrote:
    I want to bring up this thread again. I have a first-generation Apple 12" G4 PowerBook. This has an analog VGA output, not DVI. It supports a max of 1600 x 1200 external display (if memory serves). The Cinema Displays aren't really an option for me. From what I know of LCD's you want to run them at their native resolution, and my PowerBook can't drive that. Plus I would need a DVI converter, also not ideal.

    So I'm thinking of non-Apple LCD, or a CRT. I'm thinking 17" or 19". Must be analog VGA. Any suggestions?

    Or, how about this: get an eMac, with the 17" flat CRT, the big hard disk, and the Super Drive (that I really wish my PowerBook had). For a grand I'd get a faster CPU/system bus, the monitor, and the Super Drive, all in one package. Decent idea?
    eMacs are cool. thats a great idea - just buy two, PM me and I'll send you my shipping address :D
    Erik
    moderator of: The Flea Market [ guidelines ]

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