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Daylight fill flash

mercphotomercphoto Registered Users Posts: 4,550 Major grins
edited July 27, 2004 in Technique
I'm fortunate enough to be able to land a commissioned session with the owner of a new Harley Sportster. Gorgeous bike. I'm planning a session about an hour before sunset at a nearby school. They have a scenic and unclutter backdrop of trees that I've used for a portrait session with the neighbors.

My question is I plan to use the pop-up flash unit on my dRebel to add glisten to the chrome pipes and forks. In doing so, what white balance should I use? Flash (even though most the light will come from the sun)? Or daylight (even though there will be some flash involved).

I do plan to shoot in RAW, but I'm also wanting to get it close in-camera, and I'm also just curiuos about the answer. I've also assumed I don't need the power of an EX flash unit.
Bill Jurasz - Mercury Photography - Cedar Park, TX
A former sports shooter
Follow me at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bjurasz/
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    Shay StephensShay Stephens Registered Users Posts: 3,165 Major grins
    edited July 26, 2004
    mercphoto wrote:
    I'm fortunate enough to be able to land a commissioned session with the owner of a new Harley Sportster. Gorgeous bike. I'm planning a session about an hour before sunset at a nearby school. They have a scenic and unclutter backdrop of trees that I've used for a portrait session with the neighbors.

    My question is I plan to use the pop-up flash unit on my dRebel to add glisten to the chrome pipes and forks. In doing so, what white balance should I use? Flash (even though most the light will come from the sun)? Or daylight (even though there will be some flash involved).

    I do plan to shoot in RAW, but I'm also wanting to get it close in-camera, and I'm also just curiuos about the answer. I've also assumed I don't need the power of an EX flash unit.
    Flash output is typically tuned to produce the same color temperature as sunlight. So you can use auto WB, the sunny preset, the flash preset, or a custom WB if able.
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    DavidTODavidTO Registered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 19,160 Major grins
    edited July 26, 2004
    I shoot in RAW, and had a situation recently where I wanted to use a fill flash in a sunset portrait. I left everything to auto, and processed the RAW file twice: once for daylight and once for flash. I then used layer masks to combine the two, using the flash to warm up the faces/bodies and daylight ot leave the white balance for the backgrounds, which weren't affected by the flash.
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    mercphotomercphoto Registered Users Posts: 4,550 Major grins
    edited July 27, 2004
    Flash on, flash off
    So I tried some car pics tonight with the flash. Wanted to see if some advice I got on daylight car pics, to use the flash to fill in shadows, make chrome sparkle, etc. see if it is good advice. You can see them at: http://home.earthlink.net/~mercphoto/CarPics/CarPics.html

    Two sets of pics. First was flash off, second was flash on. One set is 50mm, the other is 28mm. Canon Digital Rebel, 28-135 lens, circular polarizer. Flash was the pop-up unit. Time as 30 minutes before sunset. Aperture priority at f/22, fine JPG, daylight WB, tripod and remote shutter.

    I don't like the flash pics. The camera cut the shutter in half (1 sec. versus 2 sec.) and it appears to be way too much a drop. Not sure why it went that far. So the results were not what I expected. What to do different?

    Flash off:
    0.jpg

    Flash on:
    1.jpg
    Bill Jurasz - Mercury Photography - Cedar Park, TX
    A former sports shooter
    Follow me at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bjurasz/
    My Etsy store: https://www.etsy.com/shop/mercphoto?ref=hdr_shop_menu
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    wxwaxwxwax Registered Users Posts: 15,471 Major grins
    edited July 27, 2004
    That's interesting. I'm trying to figure out why my camera (1D) is shooting flash pics super dark as well. headscratch.gif
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    pathfinderpathfinder Super Moderators Posts: 14,698 moderator
    edited July 27, 2004
    mercphoto wrote:
    So I tried some car pics tonight with the flash. Wanted to see if some advice I got on daylight car pics, to use the flash to fill in shadows, make chrome sparkle, etc. see if it is good advice. You can see them at: http://home.earthlink.net/~mercphoto/CarPics/CarPics.html

    Two sets of pics. First was flash off, second was flash on. One set is 50mm, the other is 28mm. Canon Digital Rebel, 28-135 lens, circular polarizer. Flash was the pop-up unit. Time as 30 minutes before sunset. Aperture priority at f/22, fine JPG, daylight WB, tripod and remote shutter.

    I don't like the flash pics. The camera cut the shutter in half (1 sec. versus 2 sec.) and it appears to be way too much a drop. Not sure why it went that far. So the results were not what I expected. What to do different?

    Flash off:
    0.jpg

    Flash on:
    1.jpg
    Hmmmm Interesting. You were using a Digital Rebel 300D. You were shooting in Av - aperature preferred. The manual for the 300D says shooting in Av, against a dark backgrounds, slow-synch shooting will be set so that the main subject is captured by the flash, and the background is captured by the long exposure using a long shutter speed. As you knew, this requires a tripod. I cannot find information in the manual about high speed flash with the built in unit on the 300D.

    Have you tried using the Tv zone with a shutter speed of 1/125? You may need to up the ISO speed to allow an appropriate aperature for the 28-135mm. Or have you tried the Program zone also?

    I would also remove the polarizer filter until you have the flash response dialed in first. I am not sure why the flash image is so dark.

    An external EX series Flash (420 or 550) may offer much more light and more control over exposure than the built in unit but I am not sure if the 300D supports high speed flash synching. DrIT may know this information.

    I assume you did not change your exposure compensation any?
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    mercphotomercphoto Registered Users Posts: 4,550 Major grins
    edited July 27, 2004
    Cars and flash
    pathfinder wrote:
    The manual for the 300D says shooting in Av, against a dark backgrounds, slow-synch shooting will be set so that the main subject is captured by the flash, and the background is captured by the long exposure using a long shutter speed. As you knew, this requires a tripod.

    Correct on all counts. I do wonder if there was so much car that the camera could not recognize the "background", so could not expose it properly?
    Have you tried using the Tv zone with a shutter speed of 1/125? You may need to up the ISO speed to allow an appropriate aperature for the 28-135mm. Or have you tried the Program zone also?

    No, but good suggestions. Also good idea to remove polarizer until the exposure is figured out. The 300D should completely support either the 420 or 550 EX flash.
    I assume you did not change your exposure compensation any?

    Correct.
    Bill Jurasz - Mercury Photography - Cedar Park, TX
    A former sports shooter
    Follow me at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bjurasz/
    My Etsy store: https://www.etsy.com/shop/mercphoto?ref=hdr_shop_menu
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