Infrared

paparosspapaross Major grinsRegistered Users Posts: 131 Major grins
edited December 24, 2012 in Cameras
As I have no used DSLR, I need to buy a "cheap" DSLR to be set of to be converted to Infrared. It needs the ability to shoot RAW as well to have in focus white balance. Any suggestions?

Comments

  • CarpyCarpy Old Bloke With Dodgy Hair Registered Users Posts: 40 Big grins
    edited November 21, 2012
    If you are a nikon user you could go for a D70. I had one that I converted myself and was pleased with the results.
    I started off using it with IR filters screwed in the front of the lens. It was great for that as the hot mirror filter was not particularily good at filtering out the IR, so that allowed the use of an external IR filter.
    The only problem with converting is that once it's converted its only any use for IR shots but auto focus works OK. If you go down the filter route you can remove them and use it normally (auto focus is almost impossible, it is easier to maual focus and use your aperture to give the depth of field required to get your subject into the field of acceptable focus)

    Carpy
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Super Moderators Posts: 22,304 moderator
    edited November 21, 2012
    I use a Canon XT, which was converted by Lifepixel. I generally use a Canon EF 17-40mm, f4L USM for the standard zoom.

    Not sure what you mean by, "in focus white balance" as there is no conventional "white balance" in true infrared photography.

    Typically, I use the "Channel Mixer - Red/Blue swap" method for color processing, or sometimes I just use a B&W approach (to start).

    The following had much more processing:

    i-59NSxBN.jpg

    i-rxN2Qpm.jpg

    i-DMtHMgn.jpg
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • PhotogbikerPhotogbiker Exploring the desert Registered Users Posts: 351 Major grins
    edited November 21, 2012
    Another Canon thought is an older 20D. Great camera (still use mine as backup), and you can pick a good one up for $250 or so.
  • Art ScottArt Scott Have PASSPORT will TRAVEL WICHITA, KS USARegistered Users Posts: 8,959 Major grins
    edited November 21, 2012
    I would recommend buy the best USED DSLR that you can afford... ... ... I have seen IR photos done when the sun was going down the better the high ISO usable is the better the results when light is not real good ... ... If you have an inquisitive mind the experimenting will be second nature and using the camera for what is not exactly meant for will come as second nature... ... ...:D:D:D
    "Genuine Fractals was, is and will always be the best solution for enlarging digital photos." ....Vincent Versace ... ... COPYRIGHT YOUR WORK ONLINE ... ... My Website

  • rpcrowerpcrowe RPCROWE Registered Users Posts: 733 Major grins
    edited December 8, 2012
    I use an "ancient" D60
    I use an "ancient" Canon D60 (not a 60D, the D60 was the second 1.6x Canon DSLR).

    It is a bit slower than the newer cameras and I don't shoot at high ISO's.

    The drawback is that I cannot use EFS lenses. However, I will often use my 12-24mm f/4 Tokina. Although the Tokina was designed for 1.6x cameras, it is NOT an EFS lens.

    Side%20of%20hpouse%20in%20infrared-L.jpg
  • WayupthereWayupthere Former SemiPro Noob Registered Users Posts: 179 Major grins
    edited December 8, 2012
    Wow great photos guys! thumb.gif
    I don't know the particulars of IR photography but these type of photos have been catching my eye for a while now.
    I assume my D700 would be a good candidate?
    Gary
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Super Moderators Posts: 22,304 moderator
    edited December 8, 2012
    Wayupthere wrote: »
    Wow great photos guys! thumb.gif
    I don't know the particulars of IR photography but these type of photos have been catching my eye for a while now.
    I assume my D700 would be a good candidate?
    Gary

    An IR converted Nikon D700 should make a great platform for IR photography. Remember that not all lenses are suited to IR photography, so take that into account if you consider the conversion.
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • ian408ian408 More wag. Less Bark. Administrators Posts: 21,582 moderator
    edited December 8, 2012
    If I were to do it over, I'd convert a point & shoot. Just because it's easier to carry.

    I have a pretty old Rebel that was converted by Maxmax.
    Moderator Journeys/Sports/Big Picture :: Need some help with dgrin?
  • rpcrowerpcrowe RPCROWE Registered Users Posts: 733 Major grins
    edited December 13, 2012
    I agree with Ian regading the P&S camera and really forgot to mention that.

    I usually shoot with two 1.6x cameras with 17-55mm f/2.8 IS and 70-200mm f/4L IS lenses mounted. I love that combination. However, it makes it difficult to carry a full size camera specifically for IR photography.

    If I had it to do over, I would convert a top-line P&S camera to full time IR work. I would like one that I could put in the pocket of my photo vest and one that has RAW capture capability...

    I traveled to China and to Alaska and would have liked an IR camera with me. However, the converted D60 was just too much to carry around and to heavy for some of my Alaskan bush flights...
  • AndyAndy Bicameral New YorkRegistered Users Posts: 50,154 Major grins
    edited December 13, 2012
  • MomaZunkMomaZunk pro lurker Registered Users Posts: 421 Major grins
    edited December 13, 2012
    OK...now the next question is which one?

    I have been holding on to my D90 thinking I would convert it to IR, now I will just sell it.


    I have a canon SD500 and SD1100, but those are not RAW camera's and more entry level, so I will probably look to pick a used one up.
    Any suggestions?
  • ian408ian408 More wag. Less Bark. Administrators Posts: 21,582 moderator
    edited December 13, 2012
    SD800 is what I think Andy has. Maybe he will chime in if I am wrong.

    I also don't think you need something like a G10 either.
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  • ian408ian408 More wag. Less Bark. Administrators Posts: 21,582 moderator
    edited December 13, 2012
    I need to add there are some issues with some of the P&S cameras and that has to do with the material the lenses are made of. I don't know as much about that issue (an S95 has the problem). So be careful and check with whomever is going to do the conversion.
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  • AndyAndy Bicameral New YorkRegistered Users Posts: 50,154 Major grins
    edited December 17, 2012
    I've done SD800 and SD960 Canon P&S conversions. Both are awesome.
  • FLYING EYEBALLFLYING EYEBALL roams the streets @ night Registered Users Posts: 183 Major grins
    edited December 20, 2012
    How does a screw-on type infrared filter compare to a full on converted camera?

    ear.gif
  • ian408ian408 More wag. Less Bark. Administrators Posts: 21,582 moderator
    edited December 20, 2012
    How does a screw-on type infrared filter compare to a full on converted camera?

    ear.gif

    With a full on converted camera, you point and shoot. Exposure time is almost the same as an unconverted camera.

    With a screw on filter, you probably won't be able to see through the lens so setting the shot up on a tripod is a must. Exposure times are much longer because the filter is fairly dark-long enough you need the tripod.
    Moderator Journeys/Sports/Big Picture :: Need some help with dgrin?
  • AndyAndy Bicameral New YorkRegistered Users Posts: 50,154 Major grins
    edited December 21, 2012
    ian408 wrote: »
    With a full on converted camera, you point and shoot. Exposure time is almost the same as an unconverted camera.

    With a screw on filter, you probably won't be able to see through the lens so setting the shot up on a tripod is a must. Exposure times are much longer because the filter is fairly dark-long enough you need the tripod.

    Yep. There's really NO comparison. Love my infrareds with converted cameras. If you want to test the waters, do so with a P&S, it's cheap and easy, and as you can see from my posts above, the results are great.
  • FLYING EYEBALLFLYING EYEBALL roams the streets @ night Registered Users Posts: 183 Major grins
    edited December 24, 2012
    ian408 wrote: »
    With a full on converted camera, you point and shoot. Exposure time is almost the same as an unconverted camera.

    With a screw on filter, you probably won't be able to see through the lens so setting the shot up on a tripod is a must. Exposure times are much longer because the filter is fairly dark-long enough you need the tripod.
    Andy wrote: »
    Yep. There's really NO comparison. Love my infrareds with converted cameras. If you want to test the waters, do so with a P&S, it's cheap and easy, and as you can see from my posts above, the results are great.

    Thank you fellas...I figured it was too good to be true, I've also read about a red cast on the images with a screw-on filter.
  • Rob6997Rob6997 Blue Ridge ,TXRegistered Users Posts: 14 Big grins
    I have recently converted a Fuji X T-2 and love it , anyone else use Fuji
  • denisegoldbergdenisegoldberg Major grins North Andover, MASuper Moderators Posts: 13,487 moderator
    edited July 3, 2021

    @Rob6997 said:
    I have recently converted a Fuji X T-2 and love it , anyone else use Fuji

    For Fuji users, you might take a look at and comment in this thread:
    Any other Fuji users here?

  • Rob6997Rob6997 Blue Ridge ,TXRegistered Users Posts: 14 Big grins
    > @ziggy53 said:
    > I use a Canon XT, which was converted by Lifepixel. I generally use a Canon EF 17-40mm, f4L USM for the standard zoom.
    >
    > Not sure what you mean by, "in focus white balance" as there is no conventional "white balance" in true infrared photography.
    >
    > Typically, I use the "Channel Mixer - Red/Blue swap" method for color processing, or sometimes I just use a B&W approach (to start).
    >
    > The following had much more processing:
    Do you still shoot infrared , myself I find it a way to shoot in the middle of the day when the sun makes it more of a challenge shooting color .I also like the ability to manipulate the image in post processing to get some very surreal images
  • Rob6997Rob6997 Blue Ridge ,TXRegistered Users Posts: 14 Big grins



    I like the surreal but in my opinion you can do much more with the black and white --criticism welcome that how I learn

  • ian408ian408 More wag. Less Bark. Administrators Posts: 21,582 moderator

    IR is a lot of fun to shoot. Especially in high contrast situations.

    Moderator Journeys/Sports/Big Picture :: Need some help with dgrin?
  • David_S85David_S85 Spotter of Dgrin Spam and Oddities ChicagolandAdministrators Posts: 12,787 moderator
    edited July 3, 2021

    @ian408 said:
    IR is a lot of fun to shoot. Especially in high contrast situations.

    Indeed!

    My Smugmug
    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take" - Wayne Gretzky
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Super Moderators Posts: 22,304 moderator
    edited July 3, 2021

    @Rob6997 said:
    Do you still shoot infrared , myself I find it a way to shoot in the middle of the day when the sun makes it more of a challenge shooting color .I also like the ability to manipulate the image in post processing to get some very surreal images

    Since my last post in this thread I've gotten an IR converted Canon 5D Mark II, but nothing beyond tests so far. (I purchased it at a very fair price but Covid put a damper on most of my outdoor shooting.) I do hope to get in some serious and dedicated photographic day trips soon.

    Good shooting!

    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • David_S85David_S85 Spotter of Dgrin Spam and Oddities ChicagolandAdministrators Posts: 12,787 moderator

    Ziggy, what type of IR filter was installed over the sensor?

    My Smugmug
    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take" - Wayne Gretzky
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Super Moderators Posts: 22,304 moderator

    @David_S85 said:
    Ziggy, what type of IR filter was installed over the sensor?

    I bought this from a dealer and they didn't have any information about who did the IR conversion and what IR notch it has. My indoor tests show that it looks pretty "normal" for IR, meaning it looks similar to my LifePixel "Standard" converted Canon Rebel XT/350D @ 720nm. I plan to do comparisons of foliage and flowers with both cameras, the Rebel XT and the 5D Mark II, and the results should indicate either similarities or differences, indicative of bandwidth.

    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
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