Scan/Catalog of my parents 'stuff'...

M38A1M38A1 Registered Users Posts: 1,317 Major grins
edited February 12, 2014 in Accessories
Being the 'shutterbug' in the family (as was Dad) I've been tasked with finding a solution to scan and catalog all the images shot over the years. Some of this stuff is old, as in OLD, early 1900's stuff. Some is wonderfully preserved Kodachrome slide material from WWII/Korea. But it's a bunch.

So I'm faced with a couple questions.
1) What's the best approach to get it all scanned high res
2) What's the best approach for getting it cataloged with dates, locations, people etc?

I wrestle with the scan part in purchase of a higher-end scanner for the slides/images and do it myself vs the 'box' scan solutions.

And I wrestle with the catalog part. I certainly won't be able to do it since I have no knowledge of the content. So that leaves it to my parents (88 and 77) to do it all. They are reasonably computer literate, so that's a consideration.

I have a spare Dell laptop/monitor that I could probably dedicate to this project for scanning and theirs for the catalog part too.

I can't be the only one with this predicament, can I?

As always, any guidance is greatly appreciated.

Comments

  • ziggy53ziggy53 Super Moderators Posts: 23,724 moderator
    edited June 18, 2013
    I used an Epson V500 to scan some negatives and it is pretty good for the money. It can scan both color and B&W negatives and also slides and prints. For color negatives it has Digital ICE which really does help remove dust and scratches automatically, saving tons of user time. For 35mm it is certainly good enough for snapshots and sorting.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/496399-REG/Epson_B11B189011_Perfection_V500_Flatbed_Photo.html
    http://www.adorama.com/IESV500.html

    Film curvature may impact on quality but that would be true of any of the less expensive options. You can get 3rd party film holders which can improve scanning by allowing variable offset distances to the scanboard.

    http://www.betterscanning.com/scanning/models/v500.html

    Third party software is avalable to improve compatibility with Vista/Win 7, but I had no problems with the scanner and Win XP.

    VueScan:
    http://www.hamrick.com/

    Reviews:

    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2213394,00.asp
    http://www.shutterbug.net/news/091907epson/


    The CanoScan 9000F Mark II is the Canon model I would suggest and it gets similar if not slightly better reviews, but it does not seem to have the following that the Epson has generated.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/905050-REG/Canon_6218b002aa_CS_9000F_Mark_II_Image.html
    http://www.adorama.com/ICACS9000F2.html
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Super Moderators Posts: 23,724 moderator
    edited June 18, 2013
    For cataloging the images I suggest using Google Picasa. It's a freeware image organization software, and you can organize by a number of different criteria. It's not the best software around, but it's very nice for freeware.

    http://picasa.google.com/
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • brianbbrianb Registered Users Posts: 96 Big grins
    edited June 18, 2013
    I've heard good things about ScanCafe. You send them your slides, and they scan them, clean them up, then ship them back to you with digital versions. There's several options for the scanning quality, and have 20-30% discounts fairly often. Depending on how much free time you have, might be a good option.
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Super Moderators Posts: 23,724 moderator
    edited June 18, 2013
    brianb wrote: »
    I've heard good things about ScanCafe. ...

    We have several users who have had (mostly) good experiences with companies like ScanCafe.

    I would remind everyone that anytime you send irreplaceable items by mail and to a remote service they may be lost or damaged, without true recourse. My recommendation is to either use a local, proven service which allows personal delivery, or do the scanning yourself.
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • ARKreationsARKreations Registered Users Posts: 265 Major grins
    edited June 19, 2013
    ziggy53 wrote: »
    The CanoScan 9000F Mark II is the Canon model I would suggest and it gets similar if not slightly better reviews, but it does not seem to have the following that the Epson has generated.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/905050-REG/Canon_6218b002aa_CS_9000F_Mark_II_Image.html
    http://www.adorama.com/ICACS9000F2.html

    I wholeheartedly second the CanoScan 9000F. I've had mine for about 2 yrs now and I've never been disappointed in the scan quality .
    Ross - ARKreations Photography
    http://www.arkreations.com
    Nikon D700 | D300 | D80 | SB-800(x2) | SB-600(x2)
    Nikkor Lenses: 14-24 f/2.8 | 24-70 f/2.8 | 50 f/1.8 | 85 f/1.4 | 70-200 f/2.8 VR II | 70-300 VR
  • M38A1M38A1 Registered Users Posts: 1,317 Major grins
    edited June 24, 2013
    Thanks guys for the replies.....

    I'm just trying to get my head around the volume aspect at the moment and how to attack it when I figure out the hardware side. Then the cataloging......
  • tebogantebogan Registered Users Posts: 38 Big grins
    edited June 25, 2013
    I second Ziggy's advise on Vuescan. It works wonders fro me. I also use the Epson V500. The situation with the V500 is that the driver from Epson is only 32 bit. If I try to load Vuescan 64, you will get an error that the V500 driver is for 32 bit.
    Photography is the art of making an image of what you see so others can see what you saw.
  • ZanottiZanotti Registered Users Posts: 1,411 Major grins
    edited November 29, 2013
    Direct Film/Slide Scanner
    Not having tried either, it seems a dedicated model to slides and negatives is variable for scanning a large quantity of slides and negatives.

    Something like this:
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/980019-REG/plustek_783064365345_optic_film_8200ise_scanner.html

    Does anyone have experience with direct scanning as opposed to flat bed management?
    It is the purpose of life that each of us strives to become actually what he is potentially. We should be obsessed with stretching towards that goal through the world we inhabit.
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Super Moderators Posts: 23,724 moderator
    edited November 29, 2013
    Zanotti wrote: »
    Not having tried either, it seems a dedicated model to slides and negatives is variable for scanning a large quantity of slides and negatives.

    Something like this:
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/980019-REG/plustek_783064365345_optic_film_8200ise_scanner.html

    Does anyone have experience with direct scanning as opposed to flat bed management?

    I have a Minolta DiMAGE Scan Dual III film scanner and I used it as late as 2004 to scan wedding negatives and slides. (More recently it was used for digitizing old personal negatives.)

    Basic quality of the scan is very nice but scratches and dust make using it a tedious affair. Sometimes, you can't get full dynamic range with a single scan exposure, requiring a second scan and then tone blending to get better results with subjects of high contrast.

    I gather that the Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE you linked to has "Integrated Infrared Dust/Scratch Removal", which is generally incompatible with Kodachrome and B&W film. (You can also scan without the infrared scan enabled, and then use software in post-processing to remove dust and scratches.)

    White balance and color balance can be a problem with old color negatives/slides, so a color-accurate display is a distinct benefit, along with software to automate color balance of whites, blacks and skin tones.

    Third-party scan software, like VueScan, can be more efficient than much of the OEM software bundled with film scanners. VueScan also allows older scanners to work with new operating systems (assuming a compatible scanner driver too, and an otherwise compatible hardware interface).

    Getting back to your question, I like to use a flatbed scanner in film scan mode for quick scans and culling, then the dedicated film scanner for finals and highest quality. Alternately, you can still find individuals and services which offer film scanning on very high quality scanners including wet scanning and drum scanning.
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • brancaleonebrancaleone Registered Users Posts: 55 Big grins
    edited November 30, 2013
    Epson 1200Photo
    ziggy53 wrote: »
    I used an Epson V500 to scan some negatives and it is pretty good for the money. It can scan both color and B&W negatives and also slides and prints. For color negatives it has Digital ICE which really does help remove dust and scratches automatically, saving tons of user time. For 35mm it is certainly good enough for snapshots and sorting.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/496399-REG/Epson_B11B189011_Perfection_V500_Flatbed_Photo.html
    http://www.adorama.com/IESV500.html

    Film curvature may impact on quality but that would be true of any of the less expensive options. You can get 3rd party film holders which can improve scanning by allowing variable offset distances to the scanboard.

    http://www.betterscanning.com/scanning/models/v500.html

    Third party software is avalable to improve compatibility with Vista/Win 7, but I had no problems with the scanner and Win XP.

    VueScan:
    http://www.hamrick.com/

    Reviews:

    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2213394,00.asp
    http://www.shutterbug.net/news/091907epson/


    The CanoScan 9000F Mark II is the Canon model I would suggest and it gets similar if not slightly better reviews, but it does not seem to have the following that the Epson has generated.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/905050-REG/Canon_6218b002aa_CS_9000F_Mark_II_Image.html
    http://www.adorama.com/ICACS9000F2.html

    Ziggy, I checked B&H page and the Epson V500 is discontinued, since my finances are a little bit stretched now, I have a Epson 1200 Photo which used to be a decent photo scanner but after Apple switch to Intel the driver for that scanner is so poor that I use it only to scan general documents when I need a copy. Are you aware of better app for the 1200 availability? Do you know if the Canon Pixma 100 has image scanning capabilities?
    Thank you.
  • tebogantebogan Registered Users Posts: 38 Big grins
    edited December 2, 2013
    Ziggy, I checked B&H page and the Epson V500 is discontinued, since my finances are a little bit stretched now, I have a Epson 1200 Photo which used to be a decent photo scanner but after Apple switch to Intel the driver for that scanner is so poor that I use it only to scan general documents when I need a copy. Are you aware of better app for the 1200 availability? Do you know if the Canon Pixma 100 has image scanning capabilities?
    Thank you.

    If it is the ip100 you are looking at, then no, it does not have a scanner but uses 2 ink tanks only.
    The Epson V500 was replaced by the V550. I have the V500 and it is my horse that I ride to scan negs, slides and images.
    Photography is the art of making an image of what you see so others can see what you saw.
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Super Moderators Posts: 23,724 moderator
    edited December 3, 2013
    ... I have a Epson 1200 Photo which used to be a decent photo scanner but after Apple switch to Intel the driver for that scanner is so poor that I use it only to scan general documents when I need a copy. Are you aware of better app for the 1200 availability? Do you know if the Canon Pixma 100 has image scanning capabilities?
    Thank you.

    If you mean that you have an "Epson Perfection 1200U Photo Scanner", then it appears that VueScan should work with your scanner and most Intel Macs with OS-X:

    http://www.hamrick.com/vuescan/epson_perfection_1200u.html

    It's free to try.
    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • M38A1M38A1 Registered Users Posts: 1,317 Major grins
    edited February 12, 2014
    Well, I made a platform change to a MacbookPro/retina 15" and am still without a scanner for this project.

    Changing platforms, are the recommendations above still valid options? Or are there alternate/preferred Mac products which should be considered?

    I'm looking at some downtime for me in the next six weeks or so and thought this would be the ideal time to get this project done.

    Thoughts?
  • TonyCooperTonyCooper Registered Users Posts: 2,275 Major grins
    edited February 12, 2014
    I have an extensive collection of family photographs on my computer
    that are kept under control in Lightroom. Various keywords are assigned.

    1. Year, if known. Unfortunately, too many are unknown and keyworded
    by century.

    2. Family side. My direct family, father's side, mother's side, father's father's side,
    mother's mother's side, etc. It doesn't take a lot of keywords.

    3. I don't keyword by name. That gets far too complicated with multiple people
    in a photo, and very little reason to find individuals.

    Dating old photos is the tough part. Some prints have the date on the
    back, but not all. Sometimes just looking at the clothing style helps.

    I sent out Dropbox groups of photos with unknown dates or people
    to various family members, and it turned out to be a project that
    interested quite a few people. Almost a detective game.
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/
  • M38A1M38A1 Registered Users Posts: 1,317 Major grins
    edited February 12, 2014
    Tony, thanks for the id/catalog tips.... VERY much appreciated.
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