Wedding Shots

PixelCharmPixelCharm Big grinsPosts: 37Registered Users Big grins
edited March 15, 2014 in Weddings
I am going to a wedding in the Smokey Mtns in May. I am going as a guest, but I love my camera and try to find "something" to photograph daily. LOL

I have a Canon 6D. I just got it as an upgrade from my Rebel 4ti.
I don't have many lenses for this new camera, and unfortunately am not able to use my EF-s lenses.

What I am wondering is, I will probably try to get my own shots of the couple
But I'm not the photographer, and not even sure if they are having one or not.

But not sure what I would need to practice my skills.

Any suggestions for "perfect lens"?
I don't use a flash, but not sure if my shots won't come out well if I don't use one as a way of stabilizing my lighting?

Just trying to figure out what the "must have"s are to see if I can get good pictures

Comments

  • unique93unique93 Big grins Posts: 69Registered Users Big grins
    edited February 24, 2014
    There is no perfect lens for weddings, you can buy 24-70 f2.8, and you will have covered good range for event like wedding... :)
  • lifeinfocuslifeinfocus Phils Imaging Posts: 1,461Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 24, 2014
    This is going to vary by photographer. One person said he carries two cameras - one with a 85 f/1.4 and the second with 24-70mm 2.8 lens.

    Another recent posting asked about lens and wanted to keep price down. Sigma 24-70mm 2.8 was suggested.
    http://www.PhilsImaging.com
    "You don't take a photograph, you make it." ~Ansel Adams
    Phil
  • SamSam San Jose CA Posts: 7,418Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 24, 2014
    Go ahead and read all about wedding photography, BUT DON"T focus on your camera or all the shots you can get.

    Enjoy the day and don't get in the way of the paid photographer, don't shadow him or her, especially don't use flash while the pro is shooting. You don't want to end up photo bombing the couples images.

    Sam
  • PixelCharmPixelCharm Big grins Posts: 37Registered Users Big grins
    edited February 24, 2014
    Thanks all! Sam, I would not go anywhere near the professional to capture his shots. He is being paid for his services, and I would not want him to feel uncomfortable, because he would have no idea of my skill level and I could be a distraction. Plus I think it would be just plain rude to shadow a photographer at his event. I just want to be able to capture my own little shots that are not posed if that makes any sense at all.
  • SamSam San Jose CA Posts: 7,418Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 24, 2014
    PixelCharm wrote: »
    Thanks all! Sam, I would not go anywhere near the professional to capture his shots. He is being paid for his services, and I would not want him to feel uncomfortable, because he would have no idea of my skill level and I could be a distraction. Plus I think it would be just plain rude to shadow a photographer at his event. I just want to be able to capture my own little shots that are not posed if that makes any sense at all.

    Yes it makes sense.

    You won't make the pro feel uncomfortable. It just makes it harder. He or she isn't concerned about anyone's skill level or the great shots you get. The concern is more about guests so focused in getting their shots they ignore everything else jump in unexpectedly and get in the way.

    Also when there is an aggressive guest photographer the bride, groom and others don't know where to look and we get a photo with people looking every which way.

    Go, enjoy, get all the odd shots, the reception shots, venue, friends, etc.

    Sam
  • Matthew SavilleMatthew Saville Wedding Photographer Southern CaliforniaPosts: 3,352Registered Users, Retired Mod Major grins
    edited February 26, 2014
    If you're going as a guest, then bring one camera with a telephoto and a medium wide lens. Done. Maybe a 35 prime and an 85 prime.

    Of course if you're a fan of lugging around heavy stuff, sure a 24-70 and 70-200 would be nice. But as someone who shoots wedding full time Laughing.gif, whenever I'm a guest I do NOT want to carry around that extra weight. 2-3 primes and I'm happy. Sometimes if there won't be too much low-light shooting, I may not even bring my full-frame camera and instead opt for my beginner crop-sensor travel camera. :-)

    =Matt=
    My first thought is always of light.” – Galen Rowell
    My SmugMug PortfolioMy Astro-Landscape Photo BlogDgrin Weddings Forum
  • JonaBeth RussellJonaBeth Russell Major grins MauiPosts: 880Registered Users Major grins
    edited March 6, 2014
    These are all great suggestions. Is there another option that covers a broader range? Such as 18-200 zoom?
  • JonaBeth RussellJonaBeth Russell Major grins MauiPosts: 880Registered Users Major grins
    edited March 6, 2014
    If you're going as a guest, then bring one camera with a telephoto and a medium wide lens. Done. Maybe a 35 prime and an 85 prime.

    Of course if you're a fan of lugging around heavy stuff, sure a 24-70 and 70-200 would be nice. But as someone who shoots wedding full time Laughing.gif, whenever I'm a guest I do NOT want to carry around that extra weight. 2-3 primes and I'm happy. Sometimes if there won't be too much low-light shooting, I may not even bring my full-frame camera and instead opt for my beginner crop-sensor travel camera. :-)

    =Matt=

    Is the travel camera a beginner camera because of the crop-sensor? If so, why?
  • Matthew SavilleMatthew Saville Wedding Photographer Southern CaliforniaPosts: 3,352Registered Users, Retired Mod Major grins
    edited March 6, 2014
    These are all great suggestions. Is there another option that covers a broader range? Such as 18-200 zoom?

    It really depends what you want to get out of the experience. Covering every perspective from 18mm to 200mm might be valuable to some people, but as a full-time professional I like to go in the opposite direction when I'm not "ON THE JOB" so to speak. I'm far happier to challenge myself to just see what I can get with a 35mm or 85mm prime.

    In other words, it comes down to what mood you're in. How much are you seeing this as an art or a craft, and how much are you seeing it as a task or duty?

    =Matt=
    My first thought is always of light.” – Galen Rowell
    My SmugMug PortfolioMy Astro-Landscape Photo BlogDgrin Weddings Forum
  • Matthew SavilleMatthew Saville Wedding Photographer Southern CaliforniaPosts: 3,352Registered Users, Retired Mod Major grins
    edited March 6, 2014
    Is the travel camera a beginner camera because of the crop-sensor? If so, why?

    The camera is a Nikon D5300 which is in the second-lowest class of camera that Nikon offers, (bascially the most expensive Rebel, if you shoot Canon), ...so it is indeed squarely marketed towards beginners and amateurs, even though the sensor it contains is incredible and capable of very professional results.

    I also got the shiny red one. ;-)

    =Matt=
    My first thought is always of light.” – Galen Rowell
    My SmugMug PortfolioMy Astro-Landscape Photo BlogDgrin Weddings Forum
  • JonaBeth RussellJonaBeth Russell Major grins MauiPosts: 880Registered Users Major grins
    edited March 7, 2014
    Ha! Never knew there was a shiny red one :)
  • JonaBeth RussellJonaBeth Russell Major grins MauiPosts: 880Registered Users Major grins
    edited March 7, 2014
    The camera is a Nikon D5300 which is in the second-lowest class of camera that Nikon offers, (bascially the most expensive Rebel, if you shoot Canon), ...so it is indeed squarely marketed towards beginners and amateurs, even though the sensor it contains is incredible and capable of very professional results.

    I also got the shiny red one. ;-)

    =Matt=



    I understand it is marketed toward beginners and amateurs, but what actually makes it a beginner / amateur camera, technically speaking?
  • Matthew SavilleMatthew Saville Wedding Photographer Southern CaliforniaPosts: 3,352Registered Users, Retired Mod Major grins
    edited March 8, 2014
    I understand it is marketed toward beginners and amateurs, but what actually makes it a beginner / amateur camera, technically speaking?

    For me personally, it largely comes down to the much more simplified controls and customizability, which equates to a limitation in overall performance compared to the pro bodies I use it side-by-side with. It's hard to list specific things because they're mostly very subtle and minor, but plentiful enough to make a difference. Oh, and one major thing: the autofocus is noticeably inferior in extremely tough shooting conditions such as fast action or severe darkness.

    Like I said though, the image quality that comes out of it is great and so I'm happy to use it for many different types of things.

    =Matt=
    My first thought is always of light.” – Galen Rowell
    My SmugMug PortfolioMy Astro-Landscape Photo BlogDgrin Weddings Forum
  • PhotogbikerPhotogbiker Exploring the desert Posts: 351Registered Users Major grins
    edited March 8, 2014
    PixelCharm--I'll just add that for lenses you really should go with Matt's advice on "simplify"--one or two is plenty. I'll veer slightly though and suggest a mid zoom like a 24-105. Good for the close and receptions shots, and just enough tele for the ceremony and portraits. Could easily do whole day as a guest with that lens. Also, your camera is incredible at ISO' up to 5000 and more. Even 12,800 with noise reduction is usable. What this means is don't fret the flash. I could easily see you going whole day without one flash picture--which keeps you stealth, to Sam's point earlier. If you do use a flash bounce it off a ceiling or side wall and keep the ISO up so the flash is just a touch to open up shadows. Or go the Matt route--put on an 85mm and shoot whole day with one lens forcing you to look for shots that work with it. Fun challenge. Number one is--enjoy the wedding. A nice collection of pics you have taken will be a great gift for the couple when back from their honeymoon.
  • JonaBeth RussellJonaBeth Russell Major grins MauiPosts: 880Registered Users Major grins
    edited March 8, 2014
    For me personally, it largely comes down to the much more simplified controls and customizability, which equates to a limitation in overall performance compared to the pro bodies I use it side-by-side with. It's hard to list specific things because they're mostly very subtle and minor, but plentiful enough to make a difference. Oh, and one major thing: the autofocus is noticeably inferior in extremely tough shooting conditions such as fast action or severe darkness.

    Like I said though, the image quality that comes out of it is great and so I'm happy to use it for many different types of things.

    =Matt=


    Ahhh, now it makes more sense. Especially the auto focus increase in the higher end cameras. Thanks for taking the time.
  • lightcatcher2014lightcatcher2014 Big grins Posts: 23Registered Users Big grins
    edited March 15, 2014
    You can always rent the lenses you need for the wedding. This way you will generate cash until you are ready to buy your own copies if you wedding business picks up.

    For weddings you need: 24-70mm f/2.8, 70-200mm f/2.8, 85mm f/1.4 and 60 or 100mm f/2.8 macro. These are the minimum lenses. The better aperture you have, the better although this would be possible on 85mm only. Also full frame sensor camera would give you much better IQ and less noise. You also need flashes for the ceremony (if in church or other dark indoors) and for the reception and party.

    Cheers,
    --
    Trifon Anguelov
    Portrait and Wedding Photographer, Mountain View, CA

    http://www.weddingphotographyblogger.com
Sign In or Register to comment.