Need Tripod Leash Recommendation

StumblebumStumblebum Registered Users Posts: 8,480 Major grins
edited January 11, 2015 in Accessories
Again and again I find myself literally on edge of cliffs that are ready to crumble and usually have downward incline and with huge wind gushes. I have to put an arm around tripod but sometimes that is not do-able. This weekend some wind gushes were so strong that i couldn't even get the shot as camera kept getting knocked backwards.

So I think smart thing would be to get a Tripod Leash.

I have seen someone use it once, so I thought it would be easy to find one. Amazon just seems to have dog-leashes. Even google doesn't have anything. Adorama is same - nothing.

So I need something where I am free to move a feet or two and my hands are free and something that is tied to me and the tripod so in case it gets knocked over, it is clinging off me.

Next big challenge is where to buy one?

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks!

Comments

  • David_S85David_S85 Administrators Posts: 13,118 moderator
    edited November 3, 2014
    Shouldn't be too hard to make your own, no?
    My Smugmug
    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take" - Wayne Gretzky
  • StumblebumStumblebum Registered Users Posts: 8,480 Major grins
    edited November 3, 2014
    Hah! I have to based on my search results!:D
    Some thing like rock climbing runners tied to tpod and life jacket type harness on me with a hook.
    Will give it a try. Thanks!
  • puzzledpaulpuzzledpaul Registered Users Posts: 1,621 Major grins
    edited November 3, 2014
    Pipe / 'jubilee' / hose clips come to mind, as an inexpensive, lightweight possibility ... or for something that has other uses way beyond this ... a Manfrotto superclamp.
    I've used such an item - with its own ball head attached - clamped to a tripod leg (or metal railings / fencing etc) when the tripod on its own didn't allow me the access I wanted.

    A particular type of pipe clip I'm using at the moment for a current project is a Unex pipe clip - stainless steel and brass, offers a piece of threaded studding for attaching other stuff to it, very light and the band locating on the pipe has a very low profile. It helps that I found a load on Fleabay for a decent price, too :)

    pp
  • StumblebumStumblebum Registered Users Posts: 8,480 Major grins
    edited November 3, 2014
    Pipe / 'jubilee' / hose clips come to mind, as an inexpensive, lightweight possibility ... or for something that has other uses way beyond this ... a Manfrotto superclamp.
    I've used such an item - with its own ball head attached - clamped to a tripod leg (or metal railings / fencing etc) when the tripod on its own didn't allow me the access I wanted.

    A particular type of pipe clip I'm using at the moment for a current project is a Unex pipe clip - stainless steel and brass, offers a piece of threaded studding for attaching other stuff to it, very light and the band locating on the pipe has a very low profile. It helps that I found a load on Fleabay for a decent price, too :)

    pp

    Thanks Paul! Info I needed and will look into! I will still give an honest college try to building one:D.....but then will have to find a solution as risk is way to high. I can't even retrieve the gear if it gets knocked over or slips. Cheers m8!
  • SamSam Registered Users Posts: 7,419 Major grins
    edited November 3, 2014
    What about simply using the camera strap? If the strap is around your neck and anything happens the camera will be tied to you, close to your chest for protection. The camera is attached to the tripod, and the camera can't spin on any type of tripod strap to whack the ground.

    There is also something called insurance. :D

    Sam
  • StumblebumStumblebum Registered Users Posts: 8,480 Major grins
    edited November 3, 2014
    Sam wrote: »
    What about simply using the camera strap? If the strap is around your neck and anything happens the camera will be tied to you, close to your chest for protection. The camera is attached to the tripod, and the camera can't spin on any type of tripod strap to whack the ground.

    There is also something called insurance. :D

    Sam

    Thanks Sam! Will have to bite the bullet on insurance. Way too stressful to protect the gear. The strap idea.....I don't know....I take 10 minutes or longer exposures and wait for good light literally for hours....and not sure I can manage to stay still for that long.....or at all.....already have trouble of bumping into my tri-pod....changing filters had become a hassle so just invested in Lee filter carrier...can take upto 10 or so and can hang off the tripod so that will simplify some tasks........I want to be move around without shaking the setup....but not let it either bang on ground or head to Davey Jones' Locker!:D

    Real issue this....so will have to find a workable solution, but going to buy the Canon Professional Service by lying.....:D.....and insurance!

    Cheers!
  • TonyCooperTonyCooper Registered Users Posts: 2,275 Major grins
    edited November 3, 2014
    I would use a cloth or (strong) plastic bag and some cord. Rather than tether it to me,
    I'd fill the bag with dirt or rocks from the location and use it as a weight to stabilize
    the tripod by hanging it between the legs of the tripod.

    The advantage of this would be that the contents of the bag could be discarded when
    the need is over, and the bag and cord could be stuffed in a pocket. Nothing really extra
    to carry on the trek back to civilization.

    Mind you, I've never had the need. There are no cliffs or mountains in Florida, and not
    much in the way of strong winds.
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    http://tonycooper.smugmug.com/
  • puzzledpaulpuzzledpaul Registered Users Posts: 1,621 Major grins
    edited November 3, 2014
    This is probably going to fit into the totally stupid (suggestions) category ... but would it be worth considering some way of enlarging the tripod's footprint - as well as using other ideas, like the weight.

    Adding the weight lowers the centre of gravity, but attaching 'outriggers' to the bottom of the legs also enlarges the footprint, outside of which the C of G must be positioned, in order for the 'pod to fall over.

    Eg trying to topple a tripod that's on its lowest leg setting is well nigh impossible (in my experience, with my gear, anyway)
    In these days of low weight, rigid CF tubing, I doubt that such an approach would be difficult to achieve.

    Additional, locally sourced weights could also be added to the ends of these 'outriggers' too.

    Btw, I've occasionally considered 3Litre wine box bladders as a means of adding weight to a support structure, should it be needed - as they'd be easily filled in my typical environment...

    Emptying them in the first place would, of course, be the hardest part :)

    pp
  • StumblebumStumblebum Registered Users Posts: 8,480 Major grins
    edited November 3, 2014
    Tony and Paul, thanks much! Appreciate feedback.
    I need weights just to keep it stable for long exposures, and probably only solution there is to carry some as they are not always available.

    I usually have it set-up high and leaning out and kind of not very stable only because of the POV. So I think weight has limit because when I have the 150 mm Lee filters they collect wind and become top heavyand tip over, but so far I have had my hands in right position. Second, aside from being high, I barely have enough friction on the front leg of tripod most of the time, as the edges of cliffs are usually crumbling, or slippery rocks and I do my best to make it stable, but big enough wind gush can knock even me over.

    So I am putting faith in my 200 lbs (unfortunately, trying hard to make it 180 lbs) and as long as something is tied to me I know I would have a chance. I can't rest my mind that I calculated the right weight based on wind conditions so hands off. Need to move around arises if I am changing lens or bodies or filter holders etc. so have to once in a while abandon setup for a minute or so based on winds dying down. But that is a DUMB plan that has worked so far because gust of wind can come at any time.

    Another phenomenon that I have gotten used to is that best light occurs at sun down and it seems worst waves or wind/conditions occur at that time too. Hard to even see stuff with no light so if I can figure out how to tether myself to tri-pod yet have a foot an half radius to go around, I will be all set!

    Thanks again guys!
  • GattoGatto Registered Users Posts: 412 Major grins
    edited December 1, 2014
    I would try to tie a strap on the center post of your tripod and tie that directly underneath it to a heavy rock but even better is try to use your tripod at half height so that your tripod has a lower center of gravity
    I personally use 2 different tripods a manfrotto 3011 (heavy but stable) and a vanguard Alta series, this second one it is ideal for you, since it can spread the 3 points almost parallel to the ground check it out .

    http://www.vanguardworld.com/images/Shopatron/Tripod/Alta%20Pro/88-Alta%20Pro%20263AT/1_04.jpg
  • pathfinderpathfinder Super Moderators Posts: 14,687 moderator
    edited December 2, 2014
    I just use a loop of para cord tied to a fitting at the tripod base where the head screws on. The circular loop is just about the length of a tripod leg un extended, so I can use it as a sling over my shoulder when walking too. Para cord is cheap and strong, and easy to work with

    I wrap one leg of my tripod ( upper outer portion of a leg ) with a wrap of paracord too - it is good insulation in the cold, and always gives me a length of cord if I should feel the need...
    Pathfinder - www.pathfinder.smugmug.com

    Moderator of the Technique Forum and Finishing School on Dgrin
  • JCJC Registered Users Posts: 768 Major grins
    edited December 2, 2014
    If you do design yourself some kind of harness and strap, make sure you use a break-away clasp. You can buy them at places like REI, or adapt one from a dog/animal harness.
    Yeah, if you recognize the avatar, new user name.
  • SeefutlungSeefutlung Registered Users Posts: 2,781 Major grins
    edited December 2, 2014
    Gets some airbags and fasten them to the camera. I think Toyota has a sale on them (preowned).

    For the less adventurous, I would think a few reasonably taunt lanyards attached to the tripod on one end and attached to weights or stakes or something stationary on the other end would secure the pod. I'd probably use those re-useable grocery bags ... easy to transport, big opening, holds a ton of weight, handles and I always have them in the car. I'd also pick up some free weights as a starting point weighing/securing the tripod. The longer the ropes/lanyards the greater the choices and/or odds of securing the tripod to and existing point of connection (rock, tree, car, something dead but heavy).

    If you want to invent something, invent a tripod collar with some attached 'D' rings enabling the lanyards to easily attach/remove from the tripod.
    My snaps can be found here:
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  • StumblebumStumblebum Registered Users Posts: 8,480 Major grins
    edited December 11, 2014
    Thanks Gato, Jim, JC and Gary!! Delayed thanks but much appreciate it! Working on it!
    Cheers!
  • puzzledpaulpuzzledpaul Registered Users Posts: 1,621 Major grins
    edited December 13, 2014
    Seefutlung wrote: »
    ...

    If you want to invent something, invent a tripod collar with some attached 'D' rings enabling the lanyards to easily attach/remove from the tripod.

    Or possibly half a QR plastic bayonet clip, perhaps?

    ... and in the meantime, just affix chosen element to appropriate part of tripod?

    pp
  • pathfinderpathfinder Super Moderators Posts: 14,687 moderator
    edited December 13, 2014
    My Induro CT213 came with one already

    CT213%20tripod%20fitting-1040616-XL.jpg

    A small dog leash would snap onto that metal loop easily too.
    Pathfinder - www.pathfinder.smugmug.com

    Moderator of the Technique Forum and Finishing School on Dgrin
  • ian408ian408 Administrators Posts: 21,870 moderator
    edited December 13, 2014
    I was going to suggest a loop similar to what Jim has and a retractable leash.

    Or you could use some climbing webbing (REI over in Saratoga) and make it as long or short as you like.
    Moderator Journeys/Sports/Big Picture :: Need some help with dgrin?
  • DavidTODavidTO Registered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 19,160 Major grins
    edited January 7, 2015
    Mindshift Gear makes a great solution for this. It may be pricier than you're thinking, but it's also more useful, too. Their Tripod Suspension Kit would do what you want and is also a great way to carry your tripod out, but not on your shoulder, using your bag's straps to carry the weight of it. There's a video on the page I linked.
    Moderator Emeritus
    Dgrin FAQ | Me | Workshops
  • Gary752Gary752 Registered Users Posts: 934 Major grins
    edited January 11, 2015
    If you're looking for stability for your tripod, how about driving a tent peg aside of each leg of the tripod and tie the leg to the tent peg, or make a sorta L shaped peg and drive it in at the end of each leg with the bent over part over the leg. This should hold the tripod solidly to the ground. Only way to get camera shake would be if there was an earth quake. ;-) Of course this won't work if you're in a rocky area. Just a thought.

    GaryB
    GaryB
    “The single most important component of a camera is the twelve inches behind it!” - Ansel Adams
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