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Selective Color Images

Bryce WilsonBryce Wilson Registered Users Posts: 1,586 Major grins
edited September 28, 2015 in People
Hi peoples. Long time no see. Been traveling abroad a whole bunch as of late and it's tough to fit a little fun time in these days.

I know, I know... Selective color, "How 90's!". But I have revisited it a bit lately and think that if used judiciously, It still has its place.

I'm sure a whole butt load of people will disagree.

1.
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2.
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3.
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    MitchellMitchell Registered Users Posts: 3,503 Major grins
    edited September 27, 2015
    I think these photos stand so well on their own that the selective color, while done well, just serves as a distraction and detracts from the great facial expressions and interactions you've captured.

    #1 is the best example. Lovely photos with cute expression on baby and a lovely look from mom. Why highlight the head scarves and draw my eye away?

    Same for #3. The expression of the sister holding the sign is priceless!! Why am I staring at the red wagon?

    #2 is a good idea but the dad's shirt is just too red. Have you tried leaving his shirt in B&W?

    I just shot a wedding and the bride kept after me to do a shot with selective color. I finally gave in after telling her it was so passe, but she had seen it on some pinterest thing and had to have it.

    91215-34a-X2.jpg
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    jmphotocraftjmphotocraft Registered Users Posts: 2,987 Major grins
    edited September 27, 2015
    Selective color photos are not my cup of tea, and I have yet to see one that changes my mind about that.
    -Jack

    An "accurate" reproduction of a scene and a good photograph are often two different things.
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    RichardRichard Administrators, Vanilla Admin Posts: 19,931 moderator
    edited September 27, 2015
    #2 doesn't work for me, but I rather liked #1 and to a lesser extent #3. Which surprised the hell out of me, as I have a rather strong allergy to selective color. Just to explore the matter further, I dropped 1 & 3 into Photoshop and converted them to straight B&W. I thought both looked better in B&W. Sorry.

    I think what's going on here is that these shots are so good that even selective color can't make them look bad. bowdown.gif

    Edit: I should add that #2 does work when converted to B&W. Selective color ruins that one for me. I'd be curious to see what all three look like in regular color.
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    MitchellMitchell Registered Users Posts: 3,503 Major grins
    edited September 27, 2015
    Selective color photos are not my cup of tea, and I have yet to see one that changes my mind about that.

    Agreed.
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    ThelensspotThelensspot Registered Users Posts: 2,041 Major grins
    edited September 27, 2015
    No.'s 1 and 2 stand out in just B&W but if only the wagon was in color in #3...hmmmmmm.
    "Photography is partly art and partly science. Really good photography adds discipline, sacrifice and a never ending pursuit of photographic excellence"...ziggy53

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    Bryce WilsonBryce Wilson Registered Users Posts: 1,586 Major grins
    edited September 28, 2015
    Thanks for weighing in folks!

    The opinions were what I expected. You know what? Personally, I agree with you.

    The three images I selected to post were done so with a purpose. Each "client", when presented with that image in full color, black and white and the selective color image, chose the selective color image for a 11x14 print.

    For grins lately, I have been throwing a few selective color images in the mix to have more product to show. I am surprised at how many times a selective color image is chosen.

    I kind of look at it this way. Never in a million years would I wear a Duck Dynasty T-shirt. But, Wal-Mart sure sold a lot of them to people that do. Is Wal-Mart wrong? Are the people that wear them wrong? You and I may think so, but, well, making a profit on what people want is what business is all about.
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    RichardRichard Administrators, Vanilla Admin Posts: 19,931 moderator
    edited September 28, 2015
    ... making a profit on what people want is what business is all about.
    nod.gif The customer is always right, even if tasteless mwink.gif.
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    ThelensspotThelensspot Registered Users Posts: 2,041 Major grins
    edited September 28, 2015
    Thanks for weighing in folks!

    The opinions were what I expected. You know what? Personally, I agree with you.

    The three images I selected to post were done so with a purpose. Each "client", when presented with that image in full color, black and white and the selective color image, chose the selective color image for a 11x14 print.

    For grins lately, I have been throwing a few selective color images in the mix to have more product to show. I am surprised at how many times a selective color image is chosen.

    I kind of look at it this way. Never in a million years would I wear a Duck Dynasty T-shirt. But, Wal-Mart sure sold a lot of them to people that do. Is Wal-Mart wrong? Are the people that wear them wrong? You and I may think so, but, well, making a profit on what people want is what business is all about.

    Very well said. As an amateur photographer, I now and then will post process a B&W this way and it is almost always well received by others...unless they are experienced photographers. I think we harbor this desire for purity in our work whereas others (your consumers) see it as creativity. I think you are wise to offer this option in your packages. As one who is interested in others thoughts on this as well, I thank you for broaching the issue.
    "Photography is partly art and partly science. Really good photography adds discipline, sacrifice and a never ending pursuit of photographic excellence"...ziggy53

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    Bryce WilsonBryce Wilson Registered Users Posts: 1,586 Major grins
    edited September 28, 2015
    Mitchell wrote: »
    I finally gave in after telling her it was so passe, but she had seen it on some pinterest thing and had to have it.

    91215-34a-X2.jpg
    I think it's rather cute in this instance and works well for that particular image. Not something that will get hung in the Smithsonian, but for a fun add on image, It's cool.

    Go by the golden rule Mitchel. People willing to give you their gold, RULE! :D
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    FoquesFoques Registered Users Posts: 1,951 Major grins
    edited September 28, 2015
    sigh.. there are very, very few cases in which selective coloring is a thing to me.
    Wedding shot is not a bad idea to be used as a part of gag reel.
    Arseny - the too honest guy.
    My Site
    My Facebook
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    MitchellMitchell Registered Users Posts: 3,503 Major grins
    edited September 28, 2015
    Selective color photos are not my cup of tea, and I have yet to see one that changes my mind about that.
    Foques wrote: »
    sigh.. there are very, very few cases in which selective coloring is a thing to me.
    Wedding shot is not a bad idea to be used as a part of gag reel.

    I gave them all the images without the selective color. They loved them.

    About an hour later, she called asking if I had forgotten about the selective color photo they were yearning for. I caved and did the photo. It's their favorite and now featured prominently on their FB pages.
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    jmphotocraftjmphotocraft Registered Users Posts: 2,987 Major grins
    edited September 28, 2015
    The superhero image sort of works because they are revealing something beneath which is not what it seems on the surface, and it's whimsical. The vast majority of selective color images I've seen are usually trying to be artsy or emotional, and failing, imo. Anyway, yeah, if the customer wants it, the customer gets it.
    -Jack

    An "accurate" reproduction of a scene and a good photograph are often two different things.
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    FoquesFoques Registered Users Posts: 1,951 Major grins
    edited September 28, 2015
    Mitchell wrote: »
    I gave them all the images without the selective color. They loved them.

    About an hour later, she called asking if I had forgotten about the selective color photo they were yearning for. I caved and did the photo. It's their favorite and now featured prominently on their FB pages.
    Mitch, I am on board with what you've done.
    it was done well.

    The superhero image sort of works because they are revealing something beneath which is not what it seems on the surface, and it's whimsical. The vast majority of selective color images I've seen are usually trying to be artsy or emotional, and failing, imo. Anyway, yeah, if the customer wants it, the customer gets it.

    ^ this is exact truth. It is just sad to me that people actually request stuff like that. but to each their own.
    Arseny - the too honest guy.
    My Site
    My Facebook
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    WillCADWillCAD Registered Users Posts: 722 Major grins
    edited September 28, 2015
    Honestly, I really like #2. Rather than a single object being in color, or a single color appearing in the frame, the sub-framed portrait of the kids adds something special to it.

    Maybe you didn't intend for it to say anything Bryce, but to me it says that the kids are the thing that makes the couple's lives light up in and brings color to their existence. Without the kids, their lives would have been drab and colorless. You can phrase it many different ways, but it has meaning. It harkens back to the Wizard of Oz, where the bright colors of Oz contrasted sharply - and intentionally - with the drab, gray world of Depression-era Kansas.
    What I said when I saw the Grand Canyon for the first time: "The wide ain't wide enough and the zoom don't zoom enough!"
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