Teed-Up Myxomycete Didymium

e6filmusere6filmuser e6filmuserPosts: 2,368Registered Users Major grins
edited November 20, 2016 in Holy Macro
Looking like so many golf balls, I found this colony of the slime mould yesterday and the bark of a well-rotted fallen Oak twig. It looks rather like Didymium squamulosum, which is said to be a common species. Images of that species show the white structures to be rather fluffier but that may be due to the stage of maturity.

EM-1, Olympus Digital 50mm f2 macro or reversed HM40 plus x1.5 TC and additional tubes, triple TTL flash. Smallest FOV 3mm wide.

Harold

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Comments

  • e6filmusere6filmuser e6filmuser Posts: 2,368Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 19, 2016
    According to my new book purchase, which arrived this morning, if it is D. squamulosum it is var. leucopus.

    Harold
  • e6filmusere6filmuser e6filmuser Posts: 2,368Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 19, 2016
    I took some more shots this morning, with the benefit of sunlight on the subject to aid focusing.

    I had hoped to get more definition on the white squiggles but they are an internal mineral material and I don't thnk sharp edges exist.

    Harold

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  • Paul IddonPaul Iddon Major grins Posts: 4,650Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 19, 2016
    Strange buttons these, interesting to see.

    Paul.


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  • e6filmusere6filmuser e6filmuser Posts: 2,368Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 19, 2016
    Paul Iddon wrote: »
    Strange buttons these, interesting to see.

    Paul.

    Thanks, Paul.

    Once you know what to look for, and where, it is not difficult to find at least one colony on a two hour trip.

    Harold
  • e6filmusere6filmuser e6filmuser Posts: 2,368Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 20, 2016
    I now believe this to be a Physarum species, which explains why the white structures in the capsule did not look quite right for any Didymium

    Harold
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