Which lens for Canon EOS Rebel T3

grandmaRgrandmaR Major grinsPosts: 1,609Registered Users Major grins

I got some gift cards for Christmas. I do mostly travel photography (often from a moving vehicle) and for that I usually use the 18-55 mm lens that came with the camera which says 0.8 feet or a quarter of a meter (0.25m) If I am on a boat and taking photos of the shore from a distance (or for any other time when I can't physically get close to my subject - wildlife etc.), I have 75-300 zoom lens which works well for me. I'm not really interested in taking videos - I can never remember how to do that so I will default to my iPhone if I want a video.

I have always sort of wanted a macro lens although I do not know how much I would use it. Ditto the kind of lens which lets you take photos of buildings without them looking like they are falling on you. (Wide angle???).

When I look on the internet for a macro lens I can't tell from the description how close I can get (or how much I can magnify) the subject. It doesn't seem to be the millimeter number. What does that number tell you - just how physically long the lens is? Is a lens with only one mm number one that does not zoom? I assume the f-stop number indicates the amount of light setting.

So assuming that I have determined that the lens will fit my camera, what should I look for?

“"..an adventure is an inconvenience rightly considered." G.K. Chesterton”
http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/4a9c6/

Comments

  • denisegoldbergdenisegoldberg Major grins North Andover, MAPosts: 11,469Super Moderators moderator

    You may find this article helpful - https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/photography-gear/lenses/macro-lens-guide/.

    @grandmaR said:
    When I look on the internet for a macro lens I can't tell from the description how close I can get (or how much I can magnify) the subject. It doesn't seem to be the millimeter number.

    The minimum focus distance should be available if you look at the specifications for the lens. For example, when I look at the Canon EF-S 60mm macro on the B&H Photo site - https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/371176-USA/Canon_0284B002_EF_S_60mm_f_2_8_Macro.html - the minimum focus distance shows both in the lens description and in the specs.

  • puzzledpaulpuzzledpaul low down bum Posts: 1,574Registered Users Major grins

    Considering the situation / circumstances, I'd also suggest that investigating a set of extension tubes might be a idea.
    pp

  • grandmaRgrandmaR Major grins Posts: 1,609Registered Users Major grins

    yes I have started there - thank you

    “"..an adventure is an inconvenience rightly considered." G.K. Chesterton”
    http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/4a9c6/
  • colourboxcolourbox Major grins Posts: 2,058Registered Users Major grins
    edited January 16, 2018

    @grandmaR said:
    Ditto the kind of lens which lets you take photos of buildings without them looking like they are falling on you. (Wide angle???).

    For that you need a perspective correction lens, also known as a tilt-shift lens. These are widely used by architectural photographers to solve exactly the problem you mentioned. They are more complex than a typical lens because of the tilt-shift mechanism, and that also makes tilt-shift lenses expensive. And you also have to learn how to work the mechanism. (I've never used one.) You can read an explanation with some Canon lenses mentioned, at Wikipedia:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilt–shift_photography

    The other way to correct perspective is to use a lens you already have, and then correct it in software. Lightroom and Photoshop can both do this. But it works better with a higher-megapixel camera since doing it in software means stretching or squeezing the available pixels, resulting in some loss of detail.

    Using a tilt-shift lens is the best way that produces the most professional results, but it's obviously the complex and expensive way.

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