Photographing past the visible light spectrum III

El GatoEl Gato Global TrekkerPosts: 294Registered Users Major grins

Taking the next step in my infra red (IR) development and learning process....

I really enjoy the effect of shooting IR and post processing to a resulting BW image...

1

2

3

Shooting native IR ...then processing the image as if it were a multi-image, bracketed HDR set, using Aurora HDR, adjusting curves, levels and exposure, in post processing.

4

Native IR image, processed as in image #3

Comments

  • StumblebumStumblebum I shoot, therefore I am Posts: 7,593Registered Users Major grins

    Wow Gato! Totally killing it with IR! #1, #2 and #3 are just sensational! Holy crap on #3! Just brilliant! I wish I knew how to create these!

  • El GatoEl Gato Global Trekker Posts: 294Registered Users Major grins

    @Stumblebum said:
    Wow Gato! Totally killing it with IR! #1, #2 and #3 are just sensational! Holy crap on #3! Just brilliant! I wish I knew how to create these!

    Thank you Stumblebum. I appreciate your comments! Still learning and applying new creative "ideas" to native IR. Hope to post new images as time permits. Daytime job keeps getting in the way.

    Thanks again!!

  • JuanoJuano Major grins Brasilia, BrazilPosts: 3,619Registered Users Major grins

    Very cool! I like 1 a lot, although I think it is tilted to the left a bit. 3 is pretty incredible!

  • David_S85David_S85 Spotter of Dgrin Spam and Oddities ChicagolandPosts: 12,329Administrators moderator
    edited July 14, 2019

    This set above is super good. You're developing your IR skills very quickly. The comps show that you are "seeing" in IR as you do the shooting. The only suggestion I have with the B&W's is maybe to stretch the histogram a bit more in both directions to get the whites a bit brighter but not to the point of blowing the highlights, and to gain some deeper blacks. Contrast, while a matter of taste in IR's, can add a lot to the impact.

    Interested in your IR setup and your post processing software.

    My Smugmug
    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take" - Wayne Gretzky
  • El GatoEl Gato Global Trekker Posts: 294Registered Users Major grins

    @Juano said:
    Very cool! I like 1 a lot, although I think it is tilted to the left a bit. 3 is pretty incredible!

    Thank you Juano. I very much appreciate your comments. I have since acquired a level for the hot-shoe on the camera. I hope this helps me to keep the camera and tripod setup more "level," in the future.

  • El GatoEl Gato Global Trekker Posts: 294Registered Users Major grins

    @David_S85 said:
    This set above is super good. You're developing your IR skills very quickly. The comps show that you are "seeing" in IR as you do the shooting. The only suggestion I have with the B&W's is maybe to stretch the histogram a bit more in both directions to get the whites a bit brighter but not to the point of blowing the highlights, and to gain some deeper blacks. Contrast, while a matter of taste in IR's, can add a lot to the impact.

    Interested in your IR setup and your post processing software.

    Dave....

    First, many thanks for your comments, I appreciate them.

    As to your question regarding my post-processing efforts, I have put the following together....

    Camera: LifePixel modified, Super Color IR, Nikon D300

    For the image in this example:
    Lens Model 12.0-24.0 mm
    Exposure 1/160
    ISO 400
    F Number 4
    Focal length 24 mm
    White balance - custom for IR

    Here is the original IR image straight from the camera, prior to any processing

    My post-processing steps are….

    STEP #1

    In Adobe Bridge, Camera Raw

    Adjust the histogram…tweaking whites, blacks, shadows
    Next check to see if a slight adjustment to clarity or texture is necessary
    Dehaze is used only if deemed necessary
    Tone curve is examined, again looking at the histogram
    Lens correction to remove any Chromatic Aberration
    Save as .TIF, 16 bits/channel

    Here is the image after Step 1, not much noticeable changes but, they are there.

    In Photoshop....

    STEP #2

    Open image
    Duplicate background layer
    Channel Mixer…
    RED output channel
    Switch Red from 100 to zero (0), and the Blue from zero (0) to 100
    BLUE output channel
    Switch RED from zero (0) to 100, and BLUE from 100 to zero (0)

    This is the resulting image after Step 2.

    Step #3

    Adjust Levels
    Adjust Curves
    Adjust Exposure
    Apply filter – Topaz Labs DeNoise AI

    This is the resulting image after Step 3

    Some IR photographers will leave the image “as is” either after step 2 or 3 and stop here. Again, personal preference, objective of the shot. What is the photographer, "looking" for or wishing to create, etc., may all lead to the decision to stop post-processing at this step.

    As with many photographers/artists I suspect, creating an image has as much to do with capturing the subject as with how the photographer’s (or artist’s) mind “sees” the final image of what they wish to create.

    At this point, depending on what one's vision is for the final image, one can examine tweaking the hue/saturation and/or color balance options as provided by Photoshop.

    I have begun experimenting using several plug-in options and various post-processing steps. I will provide a few examples, using the image obtained after step #3.

    Using Aurora HDR software, for instance, on a single IR image, as produced in step # 3, one can produce an image such as the image below.

    Returning to Photoshop, open the image created in step # 3, and then go to Filter, Camera Raw. Once Camera Raw is opened, tweak the graduated natural density settings you can transform your IR image from Step # 3 into this….

    With a bit of brightening up the center and boarders, a bit of crop and you have…

    Being a tab bit more artistic, take image # 6 above, back into Photoshop, flatten the image and then add a boarder (or two) and you get…

    Since I am a big fan of BW, I will take a look at what the processed IR image may look like in BW. Using Nik Collection’s Silver Efex Pro 2 plug-in on the image from Step # 3 produces this result…

    And finalizing with a boarder, you get….

    That is my basic workflow when I post-process my IR images.

    Oh, I make a backup copy of each image, at each step in the process (storage is cheap). In case I am not happy with the outcome of a particular post-processing effort. Yes, I can back-out the step, however, knowing that I have a backup copy from the previous step, allows me to be more creative and post-process with less stress.

    Dave, I hope this was helpful and that you grab the opportunity to try IR photography (if you haven't already). Whether stopping at the channel switching step or amping it up a bit through additional post processing, using third-party software, the internal capabilities found within Photoshop or going old school to classic black and white.

    Happy imaging!!!

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