Great Cars

black mambablack mamba Major grinsJacksonville, FLRegistered Users Posts: 6,958 Major grins
edited June 25, 2020 in Other Cool Shots

The following are classic Duesenberg models.. No wonder they are considered to be the very best of their day.

1 )

2 )

3 )

4 )

5 )

This is a concept car produced in 1955 by GM for show purposes only. It was identified as a La Salle II. After a year of show car activity, it was sent to the crusher....a common practice for cars of this intent. However, some inside guys decided to hide it away and it spent many years in an obscure garage...safe from the crusher. Look at all the clues to the future Corvette in it.

6 )

7 )

If God wanted me to touch my toes, he would have put them on my knees.

Comments

  • OrvSalOrvSal Major grins Thomson, Ga. ex So. Cal.Registered Users Posts: 381 Major grins

    OK, lets see how many of you could parallel park any of those cars in todays parking spots?

    Have a great day!
    Orv

    Thomson, Ga. USA
    www.Osalisburyphoto.smugmug.com
  • StumblebumStumblebum I shoot, therefore I am San Jose, CARegistered Users Posts: 7,928 Major grins

    Love these Tom!

    How can you not love the ancient peoples!! They bothered to color code the engine. Look at number #3!! I mean that is what is commonly known as "labor of love"!!

    if I am serious for a moment, this is not small thing......it is not just that our tastes changed......but I think it is bit deeper than that.....we did lose something. Something changed in us.....
    Trying to say something without saying anything!

    Cheers!

  • black mambablack mamba Major grins Jacksonville, FLRegistered Users Posts: 6,958 Major grins

    @OrvSal said:
    OK, lets see how many of you could parallel park any of those cars in todays parking spots?

    Heck, Orv, just steering these things was a real effort. Those steering wheels are huge. Had to be to get any leverage. It had to be a real chore for the women.

    If God wanted me to touch my toes, he would have put them on my knees.
  • black mambablack mamba Major grins Jacksonville, FLRegistered Users Posts: 6,958 Major grins
    edited June 25, 2020

    @Stumblebum said:
    Love these Tom!

    How can you not love the ancient peoples!! They bothered to color code the engine. Look at number #3!! I mean that is what is commonly known as "labor of love"!!

    if I am serious for a moment, this is not small thing......it is not just that our tastes changed......but I think it is bit deeper than that.....we did lose something. Something changed in us.....
    Trying to say something without saying anything!

    Cheers!

    I'd bet you, Taz, that the cost of the restoration work on that engine alone could buy you a nice new car today. If I remember right, one of these cars was made in 1929, the other in 1930 ....right when the Great Depression was brewing. The whole world would undergo massive changes that affected the entire spectrum of humanity. By the mid to late 30's, the Duesenbergs and all of their ilk were gone.

    If God wanted me to touch my toes, he would have put them on my knees.
  • roaddog52roaddog52 Major grins In the sticks, NE of SeattleRegistered Users Posts: 1,172 Major grins

    Beautiful automotive artwork!

    p

    I don't know where I'm going, but I'm going anyway.

    Luck happens when preparation meets opportunity!
  • El GatoEl Gato Global Trekker Registered Users Posts: 553 Major grins

    Mechanical artists! They certainly don't build them like that any more. Have to love the color, would swap my current ride for #1 in a heartbeat.

    Have to wonder, being the risk management type...hope these older model autos have excellent, working brakes. The lakeside venue, which looks to slope toward the water, seems to be a curious venue for parking what one would expect are valuable autos. 🤔

    Thanks for sharing these great pics Tom.

  • sarasphotossarasphotos Major grins Augsburg, GermanyRegistered Users Posts: 2,766 Major grins

    I always love your car shots, Tom - especially that La Salle, which I haven't seen before. Are those mirrors on the ground underneath it? Cool.

  • black mambablack mamba Major grins Jacksonville, FLRegistered Users Posts: 6,958 Major grins

    @roaddog52 said:
    Beautiful automotive artwork!

    p

    I couldn't agree more, Phil.

    If God wanted me to touch my toes, he would have put them on my knees.
  • black mambablack mamba Major grins Jacksonville, FLRegistered Users Posts: 6,958 Major grins

    @El Gato said:
    Mechanical artists! They certainly don't build them like that any more. Have to love the color, would swap my current ride for #1 in a heartbeat.

    Have to wonder, being the risk management type...hope these older model autos have excellent, working brakes. The lakeside venue, which looks to slope toward the water, seems to be a curious venue for parking what one would expect are valuable autos. 🤔

    Thanks for sharing these great pics Tom.

    You know, it's interesting about the colors. Aside from Henry Ford's stuff coming in all black, the high-end cars of this caliber offered colors that looked like they may have ben plucked from the feathers of a peacock. Those buyers of these type cars were obviously well-off and they wanted to strut their success. Considering the times, a car costing 20,000 to 25,000 dollars was quite a statement. I'm sure that each of these cars in today's collector market are valued somewhere north of a million bucks.

    BTW...the slope to the water is about 5 to 6 feet behind the vehicles....still cause to pay attention.

    If God wanted me to touch my toes, he would have put them on my knees.
  • black mambablack mamba Major grins Jacksonville, FLRegistered Users Posts: 6,958 Major grins

    @sarasphotos said:
    I always love your car shots, Tom - especially that La Salle, which I haven't seen before. Are those mirrors on the ground underneath it? Cool.

    Thanks, Sara. Yes, those were mirrors. The exhibitor will do this if the underpinnings of the car ....suspension design, etc.....are noteworthy and they want the viewer to be able to see it. It's a technique I see much more frequently at indoor shows, rarely do I see at an outdoor show. Notice that display area for the La Salle has been prepared to insure that a level setting prevails to preclude the mirrors getting broken.

    If God wanted me to touch my toes, he would have put them on my knees.
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