Gasterupteron jaculator Female

e6filmusere6filmuser Registered Users Posts: 3,361 Major grins

This is one of the largest parasitic wasps, about 40mm long, including the ovipositor.

I saw two or three of these visiting, and landing on, the flat cut surface of a Weeping Willow log, from a tree felled several years ago. Their presence, together with “sawdust” on the ground at the base, told me their hosts were nesting in the wood.

For several years, I have been aware of the presence of burrowing bees/wasps in dead trees in our garden but have never seen one clearly, let alone photographed one. That was about to change. (More images are to follow in further topics).

Olympus EM-1 (aperture priority), Olympus 4/3 x2 TC, Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 macro, 1/80 at f10 ISO 2,000, bright overcast, hand-held.

The stereo is crosseye.

Harold

Comments

  • Lord VetinariLord Vetinari Registered Users Posts: 15,899 Major grins
  • e6filmusere6filmuser Registered Users Posts: 3,361 Major grins

    @Lord Vetinari said:
    Nice find

    Brian V.

    Thanks, Brian.

    I wandered back this afternoon and there was one on the log I also glimpsed the tiny other species female.

    Harold

  • Paul IddonPaul Iddon Registered Users Posts: 5,129 Major grins

    She's super!

    Paul.



    Link to my personal website: http://www.pauliddon.co.uk






  • e6filmusere6filmuser Registered Users Posts: 3,361 Major grins

    @Lord Vetinari said:
    Nice find

    Brian V.

    @Paul Iddon said:
    She's super!

    Paul.

    Thanks.

    I have more shots of other species from this log, all thanks to this female getting my attention.

    Harold

  • DeepWoodsDeepWoods Registered Users Posts: 27 Big grins
    Awesome creature and nice captures!!!
  • e6filmusere6filmuser Registered Users Posts: 3,361 Major grins

    Thanks. Yes, I have seen them using that ovipositor to penetrate rotten wood to lay eggs.

    Harold

  • DeepWoodsDeepWoods Registered Users Posts: 27 Big grins
    > @e6filmuser said:
    > Thanks. Yes, I have seen them using that ovipositor to penetrate rotten wood to lay eggs.
    >
    > Harold

    They are interesting...I have taken some photos over the past few weeks of them and been trying to catch one of them "drilling" into the wood but it's been futile attempts as of now.
    I watched one for over 30 minutes one day on some firewood and I could see where the beetles had bored into the wood, leaving the dust piles around their entry hole and the wasp was constantly crawling around, clearly searching for the larvae in the wood but I had to leave before she decided where to "drill".
  • e6filmusere6filmuser Registered Users Posts: 3,361 Major grins
    edited July 5, 2022

    @DeepWoods said:

    @e6filmuser said:
    Thanks. Yes, I have seen them using that ovipositor to penetrate rotten wood to lay eggs.

    Harold

    They are interesting...I have taken some photos over the past few weeks of them and been trying to catch one of them "drilling" into the wood but it's been futile attempts as of now.
    I watched one for over 30 minutes one day on some firewood and I could see where the beetles had bored into the wood, leaving the dust piles around their entry hole and the wasp was constantly crawling around, clearly searching for the larvae in the wood but I had to leave before she decided where to "drill".

    Well done for trying. As with much of macro, the subjects are in control.

    Harold

  • e6filmusere6filmuser Registered Users Posts: 3,361 Major grins
    edited July 5, 2022

    The wasps may be found on flowers, such as umbellifers. Here is a male from 2016.

    Olympus EM-1, Kiron 105 f16 ISO 800, twin flash, hand held.

    Harold

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