Lenses?

MainFraggerMainFragger Registered Users Posts: 563 Major grins
edited December 25, 2004 in Cameras
Suppose you knew you had to balance out the cost of a pro camera and some lenses...would you go for the most expensive camera and cheapest lenses? Or cheapest available camera with most expensive lenses?

If you had a dream lens that is up to 3x zoom, a macro lens, and and a wideangle lens..what would they be, and how much is their avg. cost?

If you had to settle for something cheaper, what would be your best value for each?

I've been reading reviews, but I am curious to see the opinion of someone who has to use these constantly over the opinion of someone who reviews them for a few weeks.

MainFragger

Comments

  • AndyAndy Registered Users Posts: 50,016 Major grins
    edited December 18, 2004
    what system are you choosing?

    nikon?
    canon?
    oly?
    pentax?
    konica minolta?

    first choose your system. sometimes, lens choices dictate the system you'll want to settle in on.

    as to your other question... i would invest more in glass. glass lives long, bodies come and go. and i know, having been through four upgrades in 2004 alone lol3.gif
  • MainFraggerMainFragger Registered Users Posts: 563 Major grins
    edited December 18, 2004
    andy wrote:
    what system are you choosing?

    nikon?
    canon?
    oly?
    pentax?
    konica minolta?

    first choose your system. sometimes, lens choices dictate the system you'll want to settle in on.

    as to your other question... i would invest more in glass. glass lives long, bodies come and go. and i know, having been through four upgrades in 2004 alone lol3.gif
    Right Now I think I am gonna go Canon. I have a Panasonic DMC-FZ10, and being able to continue to use the SD cards is a plus for me. Some of the Canon units still use SD... Aside from that, I like the look of some of the Canon reviews. I'm still wrapping my mind around their 45 page Lens catalog, though. I don't really want to spend it all..but technically I have up to $10,000 to work with. I also have to save some of that for lighting, a few extra backdrops, a pro tripod, and some reflectors/screens. Not to mention some filters and maybe software. Oh yeah, and to rent some studio space and maybe even pay a model or two.

    MainFragger
  • MainFraggerMainFragger Registered Users Posts: 563 Major grins
    edited December 20, 2004
    Hello?
    Is there anybody out there? I was hoping for a reply to the answer to your question.

    MainFragger
    headscratch.gif
  • yvonneyvonne Registered Users Posts: 193 Major grins
    edited December 20, 2004
    Is there anybody out there? I was hoping for a reply to the answer to your question.

    MainFragger
    headscratch.gif
    Focus on the lenses.

    A good L lens is for life. If worst comes to worst and you hit hard times they'll always be there, and they are a MUCH greater determinant of your image quality than the camera.

    I really didn't know what everyone was on about until I bought my first "proper" lens. Have been broke ever since rolleyes1.gif

    And I will NEVER sell my EOS 30. Digital bodies come and go, and older models will become obsolete at an ever increasing rate as technology advances.

    You can ALWAYS fall back on an old film camera and get superb shots, even if you can't keep up with buying bigger and bigger megapixel.

    That would be my view...
  • Steve CaviglianoSteve Cavigliano Super Moderators Posts: 3,599 moderator
    edited December 20, 2004
    Right Now I think I am gonna go Canon. I have a Panasonic DMC-FZ10, and being able to continue to use the SD cards is a plus for me. Some of the Canon units still use SD... Aside from that, I like the look of some of the Canon reviews. I'm still wrapping my mind around their 45 page Lens catalog, though. I don't really want to spend it all..but technically I have up to $10,000 to work with. I also have to save some of that for lighting, a few extra backdrops, a pro tripod, and some reflectors/screens. Not to mention some filters and maybe software. Oh yeah, and to rent some studio space and maybe even pay a model or two.

    MainFragger
    MF,
    I agree with Yvonne. Bodies come and go but good glass is forever :D Good glass is also a much better investment. Unlike bodies, just keep them in good shape and they will retain their value for years. IMHO, I'd rather shoot with a Rebel with a good lens, than a 1Ds Mk II with a mediocre one. Also, more expensive Canons have larger sensors. Larger sensors have a way of highlighting lens imperfections/weaknesses.

    $10,000 to spend on a Canon system iloveyou.gif I guess your major dilemma is do you go 1Ds, or smaller? With your other needs, buying a 1Ds wouldn't leave much (if anything) for lenses. A 1D Mk II would leave you with plenty for glass. A 20D, even more. Personally, I like the smaller form factor and the higher multiplier (I'm a tele kinda guy :lol ) of the 20D. If you are a person who likes wide angle, then the 1D or the full framers might be more to your liking.

    If you dedicate $7500 to camera and lenses, buying a 20D would allow you to pick up some stellar glass. Like 4 or 5 nice L's mwink.gif Excuse me, I had to go wipe the drool off my chin.....lol

    Hopefully Andy will chime in again. He's had most of these cameras and he definitely has some great lenses.

    Steve
    SmugMug Support Hero
  • OlgaJOlgaJ Registered Users Posts: 146 Major grins
    edited December 20, 2004
    Right Now I think I am gonna go Canon. I have a Panasonic DMC-FZ10, and being able to continue to use the SD cards is a plus for me. Some of the Canon units still use SD...
    The only Canon SLRs that I know of that use SD cards are the two Mk II models. The 1D and 1Ds. All the others use Compact Flash cards only.

    Olga
  • fishfish Registered Users Posts: 2,950 Major grins
    edited December 20, 2004
    So...my turn.


    In the 35mm days, we used to refer to "glass" vs. "film holders" (bodies). That's somewhat less true today in the digital age, as the "film holders" contain the processors. But it's still true that you should choose glass over body.

    That's not to say that you shouldn't pick them all up and play with them to make sure that the ergo's fit (the Nikon D100 is really what I wanted, but my hand hit controls everytime I picked it up. Conversely, the Canon 10D felt just right and the 20D feels even righter).

    If you like Nikon glass, buy a Nikon body. If you like Canon glass, buy a Canon body. Everybody else is a distant third...including Contax and their $13000 300/2.8 lens.

    Just my opinion and YMMV.
    "Consulting the rules of composition before taking a photograph, is like consulting the laws of gravity before going for a walk." - Edward Weston
    "The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over."-Hunter S.Thompson
  • fishfish Registered Users Posts: 2,950 Major grins
    edited December 20, 2004
    Like 4 or 5 nice L's mwink.gif Excuse me, I had to go wipe the drool off my chin.....lol

    I gotta meet you someday, dood. lol3.gif
    "Consulting the rules of composition before taking a photograph, is like consulting the laws of gravity before going for a walk." - Edward Weston
    "The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over."-Hunter S.Thompson
  • MainFraggerMainFragger Registered Users Posts: 563 Major grins
    edited December 21, 2004
    Indeed...
    OlgaJ wrote:
    The only Canon SLRs that I know of that use SD cards are the two Mk II models. The 1D and 1Ds. All the others use Compact Flash cards only.

    Olga
    The problem is, I am an electro-junkie..and getting anything less than the 1Ds irks me a bit..but the price tag is enough to give me pause. I have often found my pattern of using electronics to be...get something above and beyond...learn how to use said device...figure out how to push its limits..start thinking toward what I want in the next device...

    the MKII seems like an ok choice to fall back to. I'm just trying to decide how annoyed I'm going to be when I can't get something done on the MKII and realize that I could have gotten it done on the 1Ds.

    At the same time. I also get annoyed when something is the only or best of its kind in a class...and I want it to do more....and more doesn't and won't exist. Sometimes I don't feel as bad if something can't be done, if I know that I have a camera that never should have been close to doing that to begin with.

    I admit the SD card is probably not the best reason to stick with a certain camera, but when you've spent $250 to get a gig of memory, you kind of want to hold on to it. And since those cameras would come with memory that could be used simultaenously..well, that just makes it a really sweet deal. I just wonder which performs better, high speed CF cards, or high speed SD cards. I do notice that the CF cards do seem considerably cheaper than the SD cards.

    I've been looking through the Canon catalog of lenses..and there is a lot of really good information in there. The only problem is...no MSRP prices. I'm gonna have to start hunting through local catalogs. I might see if I can find some decent used lenses too.

    If you had to start with a basic kit, what three lenses would you use? I have notices some interesting lenses that were wide angle to telephoto lenses. Some that were just wide angle, and some that were just telephoto. What do you consider the basics?

    MainFragger
  • PyogenesPyogenes Registered Users Posts: 14 Big grins
    edited December 21, 2004
    The problem is, I am an electro-junkie..and getting anything less than the 1Ds irks me a bit..but the price tag is enough to give me pause. I have often found my pattern of using electronics to be...get something above and beyond...learn how to use said device...figure out how to push its limits..start thinking toward what I want in the next device...
    The wonderful thing about photography is, once you get decent enough equipment, the camera no longer holds you back. It's all about the photographer. I'm a gadget-geek myself and while i tend to get the best of the best for most electronics, I find my photography skill (or lack of it) keeps me content with with "lesser" cameras.
    the MKII seems like an ok choice to fall back to. I'm just trying to decide how annoyed I'm going to be when I can't get something done on the MKII and realize that I could have gotten it done on the 1Ds.

    At the same time. I also get annoyed when something is the only or best of its kind in a class...and I want it to do more....and more doesn't and won't exist. Sometimes I don't feel as bad if something can't be done, if I know that I have a camera that never should have been close to doing that to begin with.
    You should realize that depending on what you're doing, the 1Ds mkII or the 1D mk II is a better camera. The 1D mk II is much better for bursts at 8.3fps compared to the 1Ds mk II at 4fps. Hell, even the 20D beats the 1Ds mk II with it's 5fps. So if you're doing a lot of action photography 1Ds isn't king of the hill. Only reason why Canon has 2 pro-level digital cameras is they couldn't get the speed and resolution in the same package.
    I admit the SD card is probably not the best reason to stick with a certain camera, but when you've spent $250 to get a gig of memory, you kind of want to hold on to it. And since those cameras would come with memory that could be used simultaenously..well, that just makes it a really sweet deal. I just wonder which performs better, high speed CF cards, or high speed SD cards. I do notice that the CF cards do seem considerably cheaper than the SD cards.
    When the cameras cost $4k or $8k I think $250 for memory isn't much of a concern. Especially once you start factoring the cost of lenses. I paid $550 for my 1 GB Memory Stick Pro and that was stolen, so personally I wouldn't feel too bad about having $250 in memory collecting dust. hehehe.

    Anyway, CF rocks. It's larger form factor size means cheaper and faster. I used to be worried it'd be more fragile than the Memory Sticks I had before but so far they've been just as good to me.
    I've been looking through the Canon catalog of lenses..and there is a lot of really good information in there. The only problem is...no MSRP prices. I'm gonna have to start hunting through local catalogs. I might see if I can find some decent used lenses too.
    Check out www.bhphotovideo.com good prices, great service. They have used lenses too.
    If you had to start with a basic kit, what three lenses would you use? I have notices some interesting lenses that were wide angle to telephoto lenses. Some that were just wide angle, and some that were just telephoto. What do you consider the basics?
    All depends on what you want to shoot. Tell us what your photography interests are and we can help point you to a better short list.

    Common high end sets that people get (only listing Canon lenses):

    #1
    16-35 f/2.8L or 17-40 f/4L
    50 f/1.4 or 50 f/1.8
    70-200 f/4L or 70-200 f/2.8L or 70-200 f/2.8L IS

    #2
    16-35 f/2.8L or 17-40 f/4L
    24-70 f/2.8L
    70-200 f/4L or 70-200 f/2.8L or 70-200 f/2.8L IS

    #3
    EF-S 10-22 (digital rebel or 20D only)
    24-70 f/2.8L
    70-200 f/4L or 70-200 f/2.8L or 70-200 f/2.8L IS
  • gusgus Registered Users Posts: 16,209 Major grins
    edited December 21, 2004
    I'd rather shoot with a Rebel with a good lens, than a 1Ds Mk II with a mediocre one.
    thumb.gif As i alway say steve...its much more fun to ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow. I have a friend that has all the mega $ toys & cant take a decent photo to save their life.

    My old CO always screamed at us "use whats in your pockets...not what you think you'd like"
  • MainFraggerMainFragger Registered Users Posts: 563 Major grins
    edited December 21, 2004
    Pyogenes wrote:
    When the cameras cost $4k or $8k I think $250 for memory isn't much of a concern. Especially once you start factoring the cost of lenses. I paid $550 for my 1 GB Memory Stick Pro and that was stolen, so personally I wouldn't feel too bad about having $250 in memory collecting dust. hehehe.
    There is always one more thing to buy, and as such, I don't like to repeat purchases until I am absolutely ready to do so. I have definately gotten my value out of the SD cards, but that never stops me from squeezing them for more. I will probably get bigger CF cards though, as it seems that the pro gear is aimed at a higher shoot rate than I have practiced up till now. I've had my camera since 11/2003, and have taken over 22,000 images on it. Also, because the images are bigger in size.


    All depends on what you want to shoot. Tell us what your photography interests are and we can help point you to a better short list.
    Truthfully, whatever... I like shooting macros, parties, nature, general stuff that just strikes me as neat, and I want to get into Model Photography. Sports I am not that into, but I'm sure a high speed lens would benefit me anyway. I am a bit spoiled with IS from my FZ10, but I might force myself to get a non-IS lens to develop my basic skills a little more naturally.

    MainFragger
  • OlgaJOlgaJ Registered Users Posts: 146 Major grins
    edited December 21, 2004
    Basic lenses...
    If you had to start with a basic kit, what three lenses would you use? I have notices some interesting lenses that were wide angle to telephoto lenses. Some that were just wide angle, and some that were just telephoto. What do you consider the basics?

    MainFragger
    Would my basic lens choice match yours? I'm a grandmother who likes to take pictures. I also have not one artistic bone in my body. My goal is to minimize weight as I cannot handle it very well. I also tend to favour IS lenses because I don't have the steadiness of hand.

    I have my favorite kit for when I travel by air vs. travel by car. For local outings it depends on where and what I plan on shooting and may go out with one lens or a whole bunch of lenses which I haul in a baby stroller.

    So the basics have to start with what it is you usually shoot. What's your favorite focal length? What are the lighting conditions for when you shoot?

    My basic needs may not match yours.

    Olga
  • Steve CaviglianoSteve Cavigliano Super Moderators Posts: 3,599 moderator
    edited December 21, 2004
    OlgaJ wrote:
    Would my basic lens choice match yours? I'm a grandmother who likes to take pictures. I also have not one artistic bone in my body. My goal is to minimize weight as I cannot handle it very well. I also tend to favour IS lenses because I don't have the steadiness of hand.
    Olga
    She may be a grandmother and her hands may not be all that steady, but don't believe the part about "I also have not one artistic bone in my body". Her pics tell a different story :-)

    Nice to see you here Olga :D I know, you've been here since May. But, with only 4 posts during that time, this is the first one I've seen :-) I hope you post a bit more in the future. IMHO, you've got lots to contribute thumb.gif


    Steve
    SmugMug Support Hero
  • ginger_55ginger_55 Registered Users Posts: 8,416 Major grins
    edited December 21, 2004
    The grandmother who "shoots"........
    I've been a grandmother a long time................I just want to see all those lenses in a baby stroller, sounds good to me (all those lenses, I mean:D ).

    As I mention often, I have three lenses. No glass. I prefer camera to lenses. Will never afford glass, even if I took the great glass lens over the camera, I would get one, or less, glass lenses, for the price of the camera I want: Canon 20D.

    Right now I have a Rebel. I have some kind of fantasy that if I had a 20D, I would have "shot" that gigantic bird in low light last night. Nevermind that we were both scared to death and acting accordingly. I just have a thing about cameras. Don't have a thing about lenses, wouldn't go through a bunch of either, don't have the money. I might want to, but I wouldn't. The fact that lenses hold their value on ebay might be a consideration. I don't think mine are going on ebay.

    For the last two weeks, I have had my 28-135 IS on my camera. Don't seem to want to take it off. Used it for portraits and used it for landscapes several times. (Not several landscapes, the beach, the creek, a few downtown)

    Shem Creek last night, same lens the whole night:

    http://gingerSnap.smugmug.com/gallery/326777/1/12995113


    ginger

    Depending on what one calls pro, if one doesn't go at least SLR, changing lenses is not going to be a problem.
    After all is said and done, it is the sweet tea.
  • ian408ian408 Administrators Posts: 21,897 moderator
    edited December 21, 2004
    fish wrote:
    I gotta meet you someday, dood. lol3.gif
    What we need is to get the South Bay Contingent together for a shoot.

    Ian
    Moderator Journeys/Sports/Big Picture :: Need some help with dgrin?
  • fishfish Registered Users Posts: 2,950 Major grins
    edited December 21, 2004
    ian408 wrote:
    What we need is to get the South Bay Contingent together for a shoot.

    Ian
    Yeah. We can all sit around on folding chairs and aim at eachother. 1drink.gif
    "Consulting the rules of composition before taking a photograph, is like consulting the laws of gravity before going for a walk." - Edward Weston
    "The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over."-Hunter S.Thompson
  • Steve CaviglianoSteve Cavigliano Super Moderators Posts: 3,599 moderator
    edited December 21, 2004
    fish wrote:
    Yeah. We can all sit around on folding chairs and aim at eachother. 1drink.gif
    Laughing.gif Fish..... and stoopid me, I just noticed where you're located 11doh.gif

    Now that would be a great place for shooting birds mwink.gif and seals and Great Whites :yikes


    We wouldn't want to be taking pics of each other. We may have some solid cameras and lenses, but they do have their limits :lol

    Steve
    SmugMug Support Hero
  • fishfish Registered Users Posts: 2,950 Major grins
    edited December 21, 2004
    Now that would be a great place for shooting birds mwink.gif and seals and Great Whites :yikes
    HEY! eek7.gif
    We wouldn't want to be taking pics of each other. We may have some solid cameras and lenses, but they do have their limits :lol

    Steve
    thank dog. how 'bout we just head to a pub and drink? beer.gif
    "Consulting the rules of composition before taking a photograph, is like consulting the laws of gravity before going for a walk." - Edward Weston
    "The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over."-Hunter S.Thompson
  • OlgaJOlgaJ Registered Users Posts: 146 Major grins
    edited December 22, 2004
    She may be a grandmother and her hands may not be all that steady, but don't believe the part about "I also have not one artistic bone in my body". Her pics tell a different story :-)

    Nice to see you here Olga :D I know, you've been here since May. But, with only 4 posts during that time, this is the first one I've seen :-) I hope you post a bit more in the future. IMHO, you've got lots to contribute thumb.gif
    Thanks for the kind words, Steve, but I recognize talent and the absence of it. rolleyes1.gif

    I will admit that I try hard but like my Art Teacher once told my mom "she's such a good kid and tries so hard, but when you don't have it, you just don't have it."

    Olga
  • OlgaJOlgaJ Registered Users Posts: 146 Major grins
    edited December 22, 2004
    ginger_55 wrote:
    I've been a grandmother a long time................I just want to see all those lenses in a baby stroller, sounds good to me (all those lenses, I mean:D ).

    Shem Creek last night, same lens the whole night:

    http://gingerSnap.smugmug.com/gallery/326777/1/12995113
    Ginger, It appears that you don't need fancy camera or lenses to produce some nice scenery. Some folks who can afford the better lenses still can't do as well as you.

    This last year my most fun lens was the 100-400 and my most fun shots were of birds. The 20D helped me capture birds in flight; but the Rebel helped me figure out that I can hold and aim a 3 lb. lens.

    http://yiayia.smugmug.com/Birds

    But I also may stick a lens on my camera and not take it off for a while. Right now the favorite of the season is a 17-85 IS. I plan on taking most of my XMas pictures with that lens.

    Olga
  • wxwaxwxwax Registered Users Posts: 15,471 Major grins
    edited December 22, 2004
    MainFragger, I think you're looking at this purchase the wrong way.

    Buying a high end camera and lenses isn't quite like buying a computer, which will become obsolete within a year. Sure, camera bodies turn over with metronomous regularity, and I doubt we're close to the end of the cycle of fast advances... but the 20D, 1DmkII and 1DsmkII are more than enough camera for most users. I can't speak for Nikon, but I suspect that they have something close to the above as well.

    You say that you have two concerns; the first is that you're a technofile, and don't want to spend $$ on something you'll soon outgrow, and that it bugs you to know that bigger and better is out there; the second is that you spent $250 on an SD card and don't want to waste the investment.

    To the first, I'd say that it will take you years, and I do mean years, to get your skill level to the point where you've outgrown the Canon cameras listed above. Unless you have a specific need (e.g. fast frame advancement for sports photography, massive print needs) any of those camera bodies will give you more than you know what to do with. It's like buying a 1995 BMW M5 automobile, then trading up for a 2004 BMW M5. Sure, the 2004 is more advanced and feels more hip... but very few of us can take even the 1995 model to its limits. At some point, the purchase isn't about the car/camera anymore, it's about personal stuff. Similarly, you're highly unlikely to actually have needs or skills that outstrip the cameras I listed above.

    Basically, I'm saying that common sense has a place in your decision to buy a camera body, rather than a perfectly understandable technofilish urge to have the latest/greatest.

    To the second point, you mention that you have up to $10,000 to spend. And yet you're letting a paltry $250 investment guide your decision? Tail wagging the dog? naughty.gif Just resell the SD card if you buy a body that doesn't take SD, no big deal.

    OK, rant over! lol3.gif

    Personally, I'd say you should get a 20D, and then buy the absolute finest Canon glass you can. Your budget will allow for nice stuff. Since you can afford it, buy the fastest L lenses you can, and methodically cover the range from 16mm to either 200mm or 300mm. A fast 400mm might put you over budget. (I assume you know that in dSLR land, if you want the finest glass, you'll have to accept changing lenses and cleaning your sensor?)

    You're in a great spot, man. Good luck with your purchases.
    Sid.
    Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabis, ad caput tuum saxum immane mittam
    http://www.mcneel.com/users/jb/foghorn/ill_shut_up.au
  • MainFraggerMainFragger Registered Users Posts: 563 Major grins
    edited December 23, 2004
    wxwax wrote:
    MainFragger, I think you're looking at this purchase the wrong way.

    Buying a high end camera and lenses isn't quite like buying a computer, which will become obsolete within a year. Sure, camera bodies turn over with metronomous regularity, and I doubt we're close to the end of the cycle of fast advances... but the 20D, 1DmkII and 1DsmkII are more than enough camera for most users. I can't speak for Nikon, but I suspect that they have something close to the above as well.[/QU0TE]

    Obsoletion was not my concern... Getting caught in a technological straightjacket is.. The problem I often have, is that once I realize how certain features work, I get into..if this only could do one more thing...or if only this one feature worked a certain way... When it comes to video and images clarity..I am an absolute spoiled brat. I am annoyed that that HDTV's aren't 3240 X 5720 progressive. I am annoyed that blu-ray DVD-Recorders aren't available yet. I am annoyed that images viewed at 700 percent are not razor sharp for detail on the screen. This is just the way I am.
    You say that you have two concerns; the first is that you're a technofile, and don't want to spend $$ on something you'll soon outgrow, and that it bugs you to know that bigger and better is out there; the second is that you spent $250 on an SD card and don't want to waste the investment.

    To the first, I'd say that it will take you years, and I do mean years, to get your skill level to the point where you've outgrown the Canon cameras listed above. Unless you have a specific need (e.g. fast frame advancement for sports photography, massive print needs) any of those camera bodies will give you more than you know what to do with. It's like buying a 1995 BMW M5 automobile, then trading up for a 2004 BMW M5. Sure, the 2004 is more advanced and feels more hip... but very few of us can take even the 1995 model to its limits. At some point, the purchase isn't about the car/camera anymore, it's about personal stuff. Similarly, you're highly unlikely to actually have needs or skills that outstrip the cameras I listed above.
    This may be. But I am insane when it comes to image and video quality. So I wouldn't be surprised if it didn't work out that way.
    Basically, I'm saying that common sense has a place in your decision to buy a camera body, rather than a perfectly understandable technofilish urge to have the latest/greatest.
    I don't need the latest, but appreciate the greatest at the time that I get it..
    To the second point, you mention that you have up to $10,000 to spend. And yet you're letting a paltry $250 investment guide your decision? Tail wagging the dog? naughty.gif Just resell the SD card if you buy a body that doesn't take SD, no big deal.
    My dad likes to make fun of people that will spend money to go to a bar and drink and pee it out in no time, but will drive blocks out of their way to save money on gas...My answer to him is generally....I want to spend my money on things I want to spend my money on...Everything I enjoy is generally priced just right...everything that I need as necessity over joy is too expensive. I live to enjoy life, not pay someone else's bills or service fees.

    The price is relevant, but what is more relevant is necessity. I have memory, and therefor don't need more until I need a bigger memory chip. I would rather put the money into something else that I don't have and that will improve my studio setup. :duel

    Personally, I'd say you should get a 20D, and then buy the absolute finest Canon glass you can. Your budget will allow for nice stuff. Since you can afford it, buy the fastest L lenses you can, and methodically cover the range from 16mm to either 200mm or 300mm. A fast 400mm might put you over budget. (I assume you know that in dSLR land, if you want the finest glass, you'll have to accept changing lenses and cleaning your sensor?)

    You're in a great spot, man. Good luck with your purchases.
    Thanks for this advice. I had an idea of what I want, but the 16mm to 300mm gives me a good sense of where to go. Now I just have to decide if I can afford lenses that are 2.8, and that have IS.

    MainFragger
  • luckyrweluckyrwe Registered Users Posts: 952 Major grins
    edited December 25, 2004
    If you cannot afforsd the lens you want and you need a lens, remember you can always turn the lens around on an auction board. Right now I have a 70-200 that I want to sell to get the 70-200IS version. I won't lose much because the lens is Canon and thus has high resale value.

    I got my 1DMkII and three lenses: 24-70/2.8L, 70-200/2.8L, 400/5.6L, and the 550EX flash that I just sold for the 580EX.

    Buy the best and you only cry once!
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