Boy, do I need Help.

FastFast Registered Users Posts: 4 Beginner grinner
edited January 14, 2004 in Technique
My first foray with my new camera. This is awful. Any thoughts?
Canon S50 set on Auto.

Comments

  • patch29patch29 Registered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 2,928 Major grins
    edited January 11, 2004
    I wonder if the lens was dirty? It looks like it was shot with a soft focus filter. Maybe there was a humidity problem on the sensor or lens? Where was the camera prior to taking the photo? What about photos before or after this one? My best guess would be a dirt lens.
  • kbasakbasa Registered Users Posts: 64 Big grins
    edited January 11, 2004
    patch29 wrote:
    I wonder if the lens was dirty? It looks like it was shot with a soft focus filter. Maybe there was a humidity problem on the sensor or lens? Where was the camera prior to taking the photo? What about photos before or after this one? My best guess would be a dirt lens.
    That's what I thought. It looks like an old Penthouse shot or something.
    What's this button do?
  • Richard CabesaRichard Cabesa Registered Users Posts: 155 Major grins
    edited January 11, 2004
    I'd say the same as others have. Little bits here and there are clear. I'd lean more to moisture/condensation than dirt.

    David
  • Shay StephensShay Stephens Registered Users Posts: 3,165 Major grins
    edited January 11, 2004
    I would have to guess condensation on the lens or similar diffusing material. The S50 doesn't use filters that I know of. And it doesn't just look out of focus either.
    Creator of Dgrin's "Last Photographer Standing" contest
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  • fishfish Registered Users Posts: 2,950 Major grins
    edited January 11, 2004
    Vaseline on the lens? That was a soft focus trick I used to use on my film gear.
    "Consulting the rules of composition before taking a photograph, is like consulting the laws of gravity before going for a walk." - Edward Weston
    "The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over."-Hunter S.Thompson
  • ian408ian408 Administrators Posts: 21,905 moderator
    edited January 11, 2004
    Fast wrote:
    My first foray with my new camera. This is awful. Any thoughts?
    Canon S50 set on Auto.
    It's probably condensate. I noticed mine was damp on the outside after
    stuffing it in my pocket and going for a ride. The transition from warm
    inside to cold outside is what did it.

    Ian
    Moderator Journeys/Sports/Big Picture :: Need some help with dgrin?
  • Shay StephensShay Stephens Registered Users Posts: 3,165 Major grins
    edited January 11, 2004
    ian408 wrote:
    It's probably condensate. I noticed mine was damp on the outside after
    stuffing it in my pocket and going for a ride. The transition from warm
    inside to cold outside is what did it.

    Ian
    That makes a lot of sense.
    Creator of Dgrin's "Last Photographer Standing" contest
    "Failure is feedback. And feedback is the breakfast of champions." - fortune cookie
  • ian408ian408 Administrators Posts: 21,905 moderator
    edited January 12, 2004
    That makes a lot of sense.
    Which brings up a good point. If you're going to be making a
    transition between temperature extremes, you need to let the
    camera warm up or cool down before using it. On an SLR, it
    means not removing the lens until the camera's been inside or
    outside for a bit. Whatever the transition, it should be smooth.

    I should have known better and put the camera in the tank bag
    where it would have cooled down more slowly.

    Ian

    P.S. If you use a tripod where it could freeze, a piece of pipe
    insulation on one leg will give you something to hold onto
    that's not frozen.
    Moderator Journeys/Sports/Big Picture :: Need some help with dgrin?
  • patch29patch29 Registered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 2,928 Major grins
    edited January 12, 2004
    ian408 wrote:


    I should have known better and put the camera in the tank bag
    where it would have cooled down more slowly.

    Ian

    P.S. If you use a tripod where it could freeze, a piece of pipe
    insulation on one leg will give you something to hold onto
    that's not frozen.

    or if it fits a ziploc bag.

    Nice penny-tech suggestion for the tripod legs.
  • ian408ian408 Administrators Posts: 21,905 moderator
    edited January 12, 2004
    patch29 wrote:
    Nice penny-tech suggestion for the tripod legs.
    I saw a tripod outfitted with something similar many years ago.
    Insulation was $50. But then you got three legs worth rolleyes1.gif
    Less than $5 gets you six feet. A little duct tape and you're
    good to go.

    Ian
    Moderator Journeys/Sports/Big Picture :: Need some help with dgrin?
  • BaldyBaldy Registered Users, Super Moderators Posts: 2,853 moderator
    edited January 12, 2004
    I had the nightmare scenario happen and got my 70-200 wet on a hot day and it steamed up the elements inside. I thought this was going to be a very expensive refurb, but I ran to the hobby shop, bought the silica they use to dry flowers, put it and my camera in a shoebox wrapped in Saran, and presto: sharp and clear lens.
  • ian408ian408 Administrators Posts: 21,905 moderator
    edited January 14, 2004
    Baldy wrote:
    I had the nightmare scenario happen and got my 70-200 wet on a hot day and it steamed up the elements inside. I thought this was going to be a very expensive refurb, but I ran to the hobby shop, bought the silica they use to dry flowers, put it and my camera in a shoebox wrapped in Saran, and presto: sharp and clear lens.
    Great tip. Could be worth keeping some around (hermatically sealed).

    Ian
    Moderator Journeys/Sports/Big Picture :: Need some help with dgrin?
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