Monthly Assignment #2: Natural Light Portrait

24

Comments

  • evorywareevoryware Major grins Posts: 1,330Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 3, 2007
    Here's some pics of locations I'd like to shoot at.

    203511226-M.jpg





    these are almost as tall as I am.
    203511327-M.jpg

    203511455-M.jpg


    203511459-M.jpg

    203511567-M.jpg

    203517975-M.jpg
    Canon 40D : Canon 400D : Canon Elan 7NE : Canon 580EX : 2 x Canon 430EX : Canon 24-70 f2.8L : Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L USM : Canon 28-135mm f/3.5 IS : 18-55mm f/3.5 : 4GB Sandisk Extreme III : 2GB Sandisk Extreme III : 2 x 1GB Sandisk Ultra II : Sekonik L358

    dak.smugmug.com
  • evorywareevoryware Major grins Posts: 1,330Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 3, 2007

    I usually give my 'models' CDs with photo session's results. And present them several 30x45 cm prints. If you are not so 'rich' :-) you can limit yourself with CD only.

    Yuri

    How do you handle this? They give you their address and you mail or hand deliver it to them later? You set up another time to meet with them? You give them your address and allow them to come pick it up?
    Canon 40D : Canon 400D : Canon Elan 7NE : Canon 580EX : 2 x Canon 430EX : Canon 24-70 f2.8L : Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L USM : Canon 28-135mm f/3.5 IS : 18-55mm f/3.5 : 4GB Sandisk Extreme III : 2GB Sandisk Extreme III : 2 x 1GB Sandisk Ultra II : Sekonik L358

    dak.smugmug.com
  • NikolaiNikolai Darth SLR Posts: 19,033Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 3, 2007
    evoryware wrote:
    Here's some pics of locations I'd like to shoot at.
    I think you got a very good selection of locations. thumb.gif
    My only concern is the bench, since it looks like being under the patchy foliage, so you would need a large diffuser or a cloudy day to avoid the uneven light. deal.gif
    "May the f/stop be with you!"
    Star*Explorer: on Dgrin, home; Master Class: open;
    Class is in session, My Facebook, @DarthSLR, #NiksTips
    member: NAPP, PPA, partner: Adobe
    Comprehending life, universe and everything - one pixel at a time
  • evorywareevoryware Major grins Posts: 1,330Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 3, 2007
    In the morning, you see that shade. Mid afternoon through evening which is when I would do my shooting, the building creates shade on that chair. mwink.gif
    Canon 40D : Canon 400D : Canon Elan 7NE : Canon 580EX : 2 x Canon 430EX : Canon 24-70 f2.8L : Canon 70-200mm f/2.8L USM : Canon 28-135mm f/3.5 IS : 18-55mm f/3.5 : 4GB Sandisk Extreme III : 2GB Sandisk Extreme III : 2 x 1GB Sandisk Ultra II : Sekonik L358

    dak.smugmug.com
  • Yuri PautovYuri Pautov Major grins Posts: 1,918Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 4, 2007
    evoryware wrote:
    How do you handle this? They give you their address and you mail or hand deliver it to them later? You set up another time to meet with them? You give them your address and allow them to come pick it up?

    Usualy I give my mobile number or email. They call me.
    As they have motivation (they want photos) - they always call me.
    Sometimes they give me their mobile's numbers and when my present is ready - I call them.
    We arrange for meeting. Usualy not far from the place where I work.
    I give them my presents. They give me smiles :-)
    (Sometimes they even dont say 'Thank you', because they are striken by their 30x45 cm photographs! And I understand them. Must say these are the happiest moments! How can one fix the price of such a moment?)

    Yuri
  • Yuri PautovYuri Pautov Major grins Posts: 1,918Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 4, 2007
    evoryware wrote:
    Here's some pics of locations I'd like to shoot at.

    203511226-M.jpg





    these are almost as tall as I am.
    203511327-M.jpg

    203511455-M.jpg


    203511459-M.jpg

    203511567-M.jpg

    203517975-M.jpg


    Thank you very much for your work!
    I like most of your backgrounds!
    As for critiqures, I dont like the second - it has 2 levels - a wall with bricks and flowers.
    The distance between them is small. I think that flowers will be too much, but... it depends upon too many things...
    Once again, spasibo,

    Yuri
  • Antonio CorreiaAntonio Correia Always learning Setubal - PortugalPosts: 6,181Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 6, 2007
    How about these pics ?
    1 204757505-M.jpg 2 204756207-M.jpg 3 204753832-M.jpg 4 204763590-M.jpg 5 204746064-M.jpg
    All the best ! ... António Correia - Facebook
  • FeliciaFelicia Major grins Posts: 385Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 8, 2007
    I haven't had time to properly document backgrounds. Could I still participate by submitting an outdoor shot? I try to squeeze in some photography time whilst managing my 3 little boys. Hence, a lot of my subjects in my shots are children.

    204489152-L.jpg

    204489239-L.jpg

    Both of these were in dappled shadow so I had to use the on-camera fill flash stopped down a notch.
    "Just because no one understands you doesn't mean you're an artist."

    www.feliciabphotography.com
  • NikolaiNikolai Darth SLR Posts: 19,033Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 8, 2007
    Guys,
    while nobody here can actually limit what you can and can't do, I do honestly think you would get the most of this little class of ours if you actually follow the suite. deal.gif
    Otherwise why even bother, there is always People shots forum... mwink.gif
    Just my 0.000002 of the f/stop ne_nau.gif
    "May the f/stop be with you!"
    Star*Explorer: on Dgrin, home; Master Class: open;
    Class is in session, My Facebook, @DarthSLR, #NiksTips
    member: NAPP, PPA, partner: Adobe
    Comprehending life, universe and everything - one pixel at a time
  • Yuri PautovYuri Pautov Major grins Posts: 1,918Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 8, 2007
    MA 2.8 Part II. Shooting. 4.
    MA 2.8 Part II. Shooting. 4. Model and Photographer.

    Often people, when being placed in front of the camera, feel themselves rather embarrassed. They don’t know what to do, where to look, how to busy their hands and what to do with legs.
    There are two kinds of beauty: spiritual and somatic. Yes, we can show the somatic beauty in a photo. But the spiritual beauty can be shown indirectly, with the help of associations, imagination and life experience.
    The beauty is natural. And all the natural is a demonstration of REAL FEELINGS.
    The try of model to look unnatural, unnatural image, pose, in any case will lead us to fail.

    5426.jpg

    How to look natural? You can say something to your model.
    (I hope there are some people whom you can call and invite to photo session…)
    “ Try to study yourself. In what pose, for example, you are watching TV, make your every-day things. You will find not that much such poses. To remember them in a physical level, close your eyes after taking a pose. Try to slightly stir all the body extremities. And try to remember your feelings. In acting technique it is called ‘physical action memory’. Then after some time, try to reproduce the pose.
    Object in your hands. In front of the mirror, try to find such a pose, that your future viewer will certainly recognize the object you hold in your hands: a book, a pen or something else… After some practice, do the same in front of your relatives or friends in order to make sure that the sign system of your body and mimics are clear to all….”

    BTW, this might become an interesting theme for your talks with your model. If you’ll find and read some books about acting technique, you’ll have a lot of info!
    The other theme may be commenting to your model what you are doing while shooting.

    Some ataractic methods.
    (Though we are talking about Natural light portraits, these methods can be used for Studio shooting also)

    1. Relaxation
    Sometimes all you need is a cup of tea or coffee with your model before session.
    2. Contact
    Photographer talks to his model, trying to get into contact with him/her. The aim is to find a common language.
    3. “Paparazzi” or hidden camera
    Not easy one. Interesting results can be achieved when you are not visible to your model. Once I had a session with my model, shooting her on her way from work. (I called this “Playing Paparazzi”).
    The same principle is used when two photographers are shooting. The second photographer make shots after the first, in ‘relaxed’ moments.
    Or when “accustomed to the camera“ method is used. A photographer with his camera walks for a long time among the people. Little by little they get used to him.
    4. Mirror
    Photographer places a mirror behind or under his/her camera. Model can control his/her pose, expression.
    5. Home
    Some photographers make their sessions at model’s home. Such photos are closer to reporting portraits, but… Models look natural among the usual surroundings…

    6. Drawing away
    You can busy your model with something thus drawing away her attention. He/She will stop controlling him/her self.
    7. Collective
    Your model brings somebody with him/her.
    8. “Understand me”
    Photographer starts playing a role of a man/ woman with bad articulation. Your model can’t understand you. But trying to understand you, he/she forgets all his/her fears and complexes…
    9. Example
    Photographer shoots his/her neighbor before model's very eyes… Then comes a model’s turn. (Oh, that’s not so frightful!)
    10. Switching attention.
    The essence is to say something very unexpected, trying to provoke a smile.
    11. Flattery
    If your model has some defects, you start extolling them, to blunt his/her complexes.
    12. Praise
    Photographer attracts attention to the most winning parts of the model.
    13. Fantasy
    Photographer in colors paint some fantastic situation or describes a fantastic place where model finds him/her self. After being inspired, your model tells you that he/she is ready…
    14. Parrot
    Photographer asks to repeat after him some tongue-twisters, verses… In such a situation your model cant control his/her body.
    15 Hypnosis
    Photographer is talking incessantly, giving his/her model a lot of info. It’s a kind of hypnosis, as your model implicitly executes all the commands you give him/her inserting them into your stream of words…


    Once again:Sorry for my English,


    Your thoughts, questions, homeworks…
    Yuri
  • Yuri PautovYuri Pautov Major grins Posts: 1,918Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 11, 2007
    MA 2.9 Part II. Shooting 5) Tips. Face
    Tips about exterior. Face.

    Some of these tips are for photographers.
    Some of these tips can be used by models not only for portrait shots. You can tell your models about them. Before session :-)
    Special thanks to my barber, who helped me a lot in preparations for this lesson.
    1. Asymmetry
      In case of the evident asymmetry we don’t make front portraits. If it is still needed, we use irregular face lighting to hide this asymmetry.
      Note. The better lit part of the face will look wider.
      If one of model’s eyes is smaller than the other, we (sometimes) can emphasize this feature. Make your model squint one of the eyes, or open his/her eyes as if in astonishment… Our viewer will be distracted.
      If the nose is placed asymmetrically on the face, or its base is down, then the best way is to shot half face or semi-half face
    2. Round and wide face
      High hats suits round and wide face, low hats – narrow, long faces. Parting model's hair in the middle, smoothly combed to parts the hair add more roundness to such a face. Such a coiffure also makes the neck shorter. It is not recommended to show model's ears.
    3. Elongated face (narrow and long)
      It is not recommended to wear smooth hairdo or parting hair in the middle. Or comb the har back . In order to shorten the length of the face by sight and make its contour wider, use a coiffure with the most of the hair concentrated on each side and over the forehead.
    4. Massive features
      It is recommended to ware smooth hairdo without bulky details.
    5. Small features
      Small details of hairdo are not recommended.
    6. Stuck out (bulged) ears
      Not recommended to photograph en face, without covering ears by hair or hat. Back lighting shouldn't be used either.
    7. Double (multi-layer) chin fluently grading into the neck
      For men it can be corrected by the beard, for women – by the high coiffure, might be as well with ringlets at temples and the back of the head.
    8. Massive chin
      Short hairdo with hair shorten towards the back of the head or hairdo with main hair mass closer to the neck.
    9. Small chin
      All hairdos creating a straight, or at least, neatly designated line from the chin to the temple.
    10. Large nose
      It will not be evident at the portrait if the point of shooting a bit below the face level or in case of en face photography.
      It can be hidden with the help of coiffure with hair on the forehead and cheek.
      Also flowing hair or a hairdo with hair gathered at one side on the back of the head.
      It is not recommended to wear coiffures with the strong geometric lines, or parting hair, or with small ringlets and also with hair at the lobes of the ears.
    11. Long nose
      Can be hidden by the hairdo with the hair on cheeks. Not recommended to wear smooth hairdo or coiffures with the hair combed back or symmetric hairdo.
      If the hairdo at half face repeats the nose contour form, the nose looks longer. A hairdo with flowing lines leading to the back of the head, makes the nose shorter.
      The nose looks much longer if the model bend down her face.
    12. Short nose
      The hairdo must have exaggeratedly round shape.
    13. High forehead
      Straight or combed to side fringe
    14. Low forehead
      A smooth hairdo is not recommended to models with low forehead and high eyebrows.
      To hide the hair border it is recommended to wear massive, high and fluffy coiffure. Also a hairdo with asymmetric fringe is advisable.
  • rhommelrhommel Major grins Posts: 306Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 12, 2007
    Hello guys,
    I just read the thread and I find it really informative and very interesting. Thanks Yuri!

    The following photos below were taken using natural light, and using a reflector to even out the lighting:

    This is Kendra, she is tall, slender and very beautiful. The light source is the window at the back and the reflector is at the model's front left.

    1470722718_fcb5fc4b40.jpg


    This is Amanda: Using the same chair, positioned it farther from the window. So the light source is coming from the model's right side and the reflector on the model's left. I like this shot a lot because this was not a planned one. I caught her looking at her legs while trying to change her pose

    1461383964_df255729da.jpg

    Post-Processing: 1st shot, just adjusted levels and converted to B&W. The 2nd shot is unedited, just cropped tighter and converted to jpeg
  • NikolaiNikolai Darth SLR Posts: 19,033Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 12, 2007
    rhommel wrote:
    Hello guys,
    I just read the thread and I find it really informative and very interesting. Thanks Yuri!

    The following photos below were taken using natural light, and using a reflector to even out the lighting:

    This is Kendra, she is tall, slender and very beautiful. The light source is the window at the back and the reflector is at the model's front left.


    This is Amanda: Using the same chair, positioned it farther from the window. So the light source is coming from the model's right side and the reflector on the model's left. I like this shot a lot because this was not a planned one. I caught her looking at her legs while trying to change her pose

    Post-Processing: 1st shot, just adjusted levels and converted to B&W. The 2nd shot is unedited, just cropped tighter and converted to jpeg

    I love it! Great work! thumb.gif
    "May the f/stop be with you!"
    Star*Explorer: on Dgrin, home; Master Class: open;
    Class is in session, My Facebook, @DarthSLR, #NiksTips
    member: NAPP, PPA, partner: Adobe
    Comprehending life, universe and everything - one pixel at a time
  • Yuri PautovYuri Pautov Major grins Posts: 1,918Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 13, 2007
    rhommel wrote:
    Hello guys,
    I just read the thread and I find it really informative and very interesting. Thanks Yuri!

    The following photos below were taken using natural light, and using a reflector to even out the lighting:

    This is Kendra, she is tall, slender and very beautiful. The light source is the window at the back and the reflector is at the model's front left.

    1470722718_fcb5fc4b40.jpg


    This is Amanda: Using the same chair, positioned it farther from the window. So the light source is coming from the model's right side and the reflector on the model's left. I like this shot a lot because this was not a planned one. I caught her looking at her legs while trying to change her pose

    1461383964_df255729da.jpg

    Post-Processing: 1st shot, just adjusted levels and converted to B&W. The 2nd shot is unedited, just cropped tighter and converted to jpeg
    rhommel!

    Spasibo for your works!
    I find them very good!
    I especially like the points of shooting, you used here. Fantastic!
    Again, thank you!
    Yuri
  • Yuri PautovYuri Pautov Major grins Posts: 1,918Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 15, 2007
    MA 2.10 Part II. Shooting. 6. Tips. Figure
    Tips about exterior. Figure.

    Note: All these recommendations are for models. But I think that photographer MUST know them and use them in his practice. This might be a theme for a talk with a model. Or a knowledge for the construction of your compositions. Cutting of a photograph. In any case I think this information will be useful not for women only :-)


    1. THIN FIGURE
    Bright and warm tones, which visually increase the body’s size, must be used. Also textiles with wide transversal stripe or frequent and narrow lengthwise lines. It is not recommended to uncover or fit close those parts of the body, which look especially thin. It is better to wear moderately close to silhouette dress in combination with luxuriant, expanding details. Only winning elements must be underlined: slender waist, long slim neck, etc. Smooth hairdo or short hairdo is not recommended.

    2. FULL FIGURE
    It is not recommended to women to wear blouses and skirts (trousers) of contrast colors (for example red and green), as they divide the figure for parts and underline the full body. Smooth material dress with small or middle pattern is most acceptable. To visually increase the height, one can wear long scarf, made of the same material as the dress. The dress with short close sleeves, wide belts, bright colored textiles with massive ornamental patterns and also volumetric clothes and ‘dimensionless’ dress must not be used at all. One must try to avoid fitting tightly fatty folds by the dress, especially by thin materials or jersey. White color as well as black, shining one does not suit. It is better to use numerous tints of white color.
    Longhaired hairdo is not recommended for not tall people. They must wear short, top-oriented hairdo. The waist might be underlined by the tight belt, matching dress tone (of the same tone). Big bijouterie as well as large details of dress, vee-type neckline are recommended.

    3. TALL
    Dress a bit higher then knees and much more higher for slim figures will be right for tall women (>180 cm). Clothes with rare and wide cross lines, better of contrast colors, or frequent longitudinal and narrow lines with small intervals are recommended. Multi layer clothes will be right. Big sized checkered textiles and textiles with big size ornament with bright patterns of bright and warm tones are good. As well as wide belts, deep décolleté, collars and decorations in horizontal directions. Usually full maxi does not suit.
    4. SHORT
    It is recommended to use high-heeled shoes and avoid too short dress, big patterned and contrast textiles and also cross-sections and multi layers in the dress. Elongated dress mini and maxi. High hairdo. That must work.
    5. Big shoulders
    Big collars are no good. It is recommended to widen the hips by fluffy, light skirts.
    6. WIDE HIPS
    Do not wear straight and narrowed-down skirts. Must avoid visual accents on the hips and try to remove them to the breast or shoulder level. Demonstration of the naked shoulders is also prohibited, cause this only increases the disproportion. The dress, visually constricting the shoulder’s line, as well as wide hairdo are not recommended. It is better to use the next color combination: warm up and cold down.
    7. LONG TRUNK
    Not recommended: close, slinky trousers. Better to wear straight or trapeziform silhouette clothes with higher waist line or hiding its real line. The recommended length of shirts – a bit higher the knees.
    8. SHORT TRUNK
    A short trunk is a very well turned defect, as long legs were always considered to be ‘a part of a beauty’. Anyhow, if the needs of photo session still want to hide this defect, then the clothes with a lowered waist line must be used. Wide belts are not recommended. Visual division of the trunk on parts is undesirable too.
    9. LONG OR SHORT HANDS
    Try not to use poses with dangling hands. Better to use poses with bended hands, when the viewer has no chance to compare proportions of hands and figure.
    10. LONG NECK
    Longhair coiffure will work.
    11. SHORT NECK
    May be visually made longer by the hairdo with opened ears and also low-necked dress. Long flowing hair hides short neck pretty good.
    12. DEEP SEATED EYES
    Try to avoid from-top lighting.
    13 CLOSE BY SEATED EYES
    They are not photogenic. So try half face photographing.
    14. SQUINT
    This defect can be hidden also with a help of half face photographing. But also we can use model’s look directed somewhere down. Or a look can be directed to the side of squint eye.
    15. BIG BELLY
    Usually hard to hide. Better to move the accent on shoulder’s line. Preferably to wear straight or trapeziform silhouette. We can hide it also using dark dresses on dark backgrounds. Decollete will be winning for women.
    16. HOLLOW, SMALL OR LOW BREAST
    Try not to make accent by pose, nor by light. Better improve it with dress.
    17. STOOPING BACK
    Half-face is not recommended. The best type of portraits - en face. Not recommended to wear dress without collars or with stand-up collars. A big collar will hide this defect.
    18. THICK LEGS
    Skin-tight pants are not recommended. Better wear pants enlarged from hip line. Better not to uncover knees. Middle heeled shoes. For regular legs its better to wear dark tones of panty-hoses.
    19. THIN LEGS
    Better to make half face portraits, sitting on an chair edge. Such a pose will visually enlarge hips. For regular legs its better to wear warm tones of panty-hoses.
    20. Inverted-U –like, X-like, O-like LEGS.
    Skin-tight pants are not recommended. A shirt must cover knees. Better to photograph ¾.

    To be continued…
  • SwartzySwartzy Right Brained Scientist Posts: 3,293Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 15, 2007
    Thank you Yuri
    For this wonderful thread. I've been following this and will participate shortly. Great advice, demonstrations and lists. I really appreciate your time. Thank you Nik for organizing this. Hoping it stops raining here, then we'll go get some backgrounds.
    Swartzy:
    NAPP Member | Canon Shooter
    Weddings/Portraits and anything else that catches my eye.
    www.daveswartz.com
    Model Mayhem site http://www.modelmayhem.com/686552
  • Yuri PautovYuri Pautov Major grins Posts: 1,918Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 18, 2007
    MA 2.11 Part II. Composition 1.
    Dear Dgriners and guests! I understand that starting a talk about composition, we risk to be lost in the labyrinth of its ‘polysemy’ so to say. Yes, we are clever and experienced. We subconsciously make very good photos. But. What about some theory? Let our technique swim out to conscious mastery.
    This will not be a short lesson. Be patient, please.
    Latin word “Composition” has several meanings: ‘making’, ‘compilation’, ‘connection’, ‘joining’. The main point of the composition is in well thought-out organization of the image in a photograph in order to give it a spatial integrity. Composition, per se, is a hidden symmetry between dozens of components, tricks and principles. We will talk about some of them later.
    Our camera is only fixing the surrounding us world. Transferring it into emotional sphere, like into another dimension, is not an easy task. What do painters, sculptors and photographers use?
    We will talk about the next things.
    Lines of power / Structural plan of the plane. / Tunnel effect / Left and Right / Symbolism of lines / Rhythm / Some effects / Symmetry and asymmetry / Form properties…

    1. Lines of power
    Lines, colors, tones, textures are common for all kinds of art. They make the basis of composition. As long ago as in Ancient China wise man considered lines that form contour of things, landscapes and people as Lines of Power. Looking at, examining an object from far away the viewer catch its Lines of Power first. They express movement dynamics, create this or that mood….

    4730.jpg

    These lines are the main in composition. And only looking nearby, the viewer apprehends the texture, color and tones. In portraits, Lines of Power – are the lines of contour of the whole body, or its parts. Or skin folds created by different poses. Wrinkles are also Lines of Power, but they have different, specific artistic value.
    We must note that we can clearly see the shape if only we the photo has distinct differences IN LIGHT, but not by the color tone. The only chromatic (in color) difference, even contrast, is not enough to make Lines of Power.

    3149.jpg

    4914.jpg


    Our eyesight has a property to continue the contour until it intersects another object. This effect is widely used in erotic photography, which can be called an art of a hint.

    This effect is used in photography and advertising. With the help of a generalized contour we can get association with very different objects, based on approximate similarity of the parts of their contours or textures. We can show by such hints almost all we want: appearance, structure or figure, some process, movement… We obtain visualization of thinking.

    Sorry for my English… To be continued.
    P.S. Still waiting for your homeworks and questions...
  • Yuri PautovYuri Pautov Major grins Posts: 1,918Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 19, 2007
    HOMEWORK Lines of Power
    After reading the material of MA, try to MAKE YOUR own PHOTOGRAPHS - examples of Lines of Power, as you understood them.

    (Yes, 'portrait trend' is preferred, but, in principle, you are free...)
  • twinsmomtwinsmom Big grins Posts: 83Registered Users Big grins
    edited October 19, 2007
    I am new here at DGrin and can't tell you how excited I am about finding this thread. Your pictures are amazing. I am so intimidated about approaching strangers but this thread has me looking forward to it. I may not get to this soon but I look forward to reading and re-reading all of this. Thank you so much for all your time and effort here. There may not be many responses but I believe it is helping so many like me that need time to process all this. Thanks again.
  • Yuri PautovYuri Pautov Major grins Posts: 1,918Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 26, 2007
    MA 2.12 Part II. Composition 2.
    The Structural Layout of the plain

    The graphic plane of the shot has two vertical and two horizontal lines, the center in the crossing point of diagonals and the axis, dividing the sides in half. The set of lines converging in the center of the shot is called the Structural Layout of the plain.

    5559.jpg

    The object, situated on the lines of the Structural Layout or near them seem to be calm and quiet. If it is moved away from these Lines, then the viewer feels the tensity, which produces the psychological energy of the photograph.

    4875.jpg

    The object, situated in the center of the composition or near it or on the vertical axis of the shot seems more light then the one outside the Structural Lines. And vice versa for the size. In order to make the figure of the man look slim, it must be situated outside the Structural Lines.
    At the same time, the object on the left will dominate over the same ones elsewhere.
    The “lever principle” tells that the weight of the object in the shot grows in direct proportion to the distance from the center of the composition. The same rule is with the depth of the shot. The more far from the viewer the objects are, the more bigger weight they have.
    The bottom always seems to be heavier then the top in visual perception. That’s why the shot looks better if its top is brighter. Also the object in the top part seems heavier then the one in the bottom.
    People feel intense anxiety when they see the oncoming big black clouds… Also, do you often see black ceiling? The world psychologically turns upside down – the top becomes the bottom…
    But in spite of that this effect can be used for the correction of the figure in case it has disproportions.

    Tunnel effect

    Is one of the ways the viewer perceives the bright tones gradually changing into dark one. The viewer’s look always pass from bright to dark

    5134.jpg

    There is something… under a veil of secrecy in all these holes and places ending with deep darkness…

    5389.jpg

    Such parts often become if not the main parts, but one of them in the composition. The tunnel effect in model’s portraits, created by the emptiness between dress and the body, excites the imagination and makes the photo more attractive. This effect is often used in dress to accent the viewer’s attention on the face, foot, breast of the model and also to increase the model’s sexual appeal.
    To be continued…
  • Yuri PautovYuri Pautov Major grins Posts: 1,918Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 1, 2007
    MA 2.13 Part II. Composition 3.
    LEFT AND RIGHT

    There is an interesting regularity: all things in the right side of the photo are taken by the viewer as usual, traditional. And, as Unusual – in the left. And the things in the center - as a placatory, balanced. Just like political parties :-)


    PLANS

    Now I am in a difficult situation. Not sure my English is good enough for special terms. So forgive me for mistakes. If someone wants to correct me - please feel free to do this!

    We are talking about what we call here ‘plans’. Hope you’ll understand me.
    We have Long shots, Medium shots, Close-ups. The next one in this row can be called Detail or Fragment.
    It depends upon how far from your object you are. And, what zoom you are using. In other words, its how far from your object you seem to be in the photo. (I didn’t use ‘you are’ instead of ‘seem to be’ cause of zoom)
    Choosing a plan is the second way to solve the composition task. The first way is to ORGANIZE the things in your frame. Still life is a good example. Studio portrait. Working on it, you can find the character (typical) pose, the turn of the head, direction in which your model is looking. Make something with your background. Add some thing. In this case we are arranging the object of shooting.
    Choosing such a point is a way of shooting without intrusion into natural object set.
    These types – Long, Medium, Close are based on scales – large, small scale.

    Some examples:

    Long shot. This type is often used in landscapes, architecture shooting, also for events taking a lot of space – demonstrations, for example. The viewer gets acquainted with the object as a whole.
    5588.jpg

    Medium shot. If the photographer wants to show a concrete hero with all his/her individual features, then this type is used. It shows the object from the more close distance, at more large scale. At this type the viewer can see not only the face of the model, but also a figure, pose, gesture.
    5583.jpg

    Close up. Almost all of the space in the shot is used by the model. Mainly we see only a face of a model. Head. Shoulders.
    5584.jpg

    Detail. Only a part of a whole. So the way they are presented in a frame must give a good idea to the viewer about this whole.
    5007.jpg

    As you can guess there are no exact borders between these types.
    In portraits we often use something between the Medium and Close-up shots.

    HEIGHT OF THE POINT OF SHOOTING

    If we take our shots from our eye’s level - this shots will be Normal. And this is a rule – to take shots from such points. But as a exclusion we also can use bottom and top points. Must say that one of the main changes – is horizon level change. It goes down in Bottom and up in Top points shots.

    Bottom point of shooting
    4641.jpg

    Top:
    1692.jpg

    Not sure I must say here a lot of words – you see that bottom point gives much expressiveness to the shot. Top points are interesting too…
    Of course I must say about foreshortening. Foreshortening shots are remarkable for their underlined perspective convergence. Sometimes they say that there are perspective distortions in the photo. Its not true. We can talk about unusual point of view here, but not distortion. Photographer can use foreshortenings in their work to hide defects and underlining merits..

    4684.jpg

    5511.jpg



    DIRECTION. FRONTAL, SIDE AND DIAGONAL COMPOSITIONS.

    Placing the camera regarding the object in a central position or displacement of the point of shooting away from the center. From the central point we have Frontal composition. In some cases we loose depth in such shots. Yes, it can be added with DOF, setting aperture to low numbers and using zoom.

    4974.jpg

    But, moving the point of shooting to the right or left we get… 3-d dimension. Our compositions are becoming spatial, nor plane.

    4986.jpg

    Further movement of the point of shooting brigs us to so called Diagonal composition.

    4802.jpg

    All above mentioned is used for creating the ‘presence effect’.

    To be continued…
  • schmooschmoo word nerd Posts: 8,468Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 1, 2007
    clap.gifclapclap.gif

    HoorayYuri and thank you for continuing this thread! thumb.gif
  • Yuri PautovYuri Pautov Major grins Posts: 1,918Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 3, 2007
    HOMEWORK. Points of shooting.
    Please, make and post here your photos with Long, Medium and Close-up plans, (not only portraits!)
    Top and bottom, central, side and diagonal compositions.
    Thank you in advance!
  • Yuri PautovYuri Pautov Major grins Posts: 1,918Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 30, 2007
    MA 2.14 Part II. Composition 4.
    SYMBOLISM of LINES

    The strait line expresses active, quick action. It is read by the viewer faster – the movement of the look is becoming slowly on the curves and the rounding parts of the line.
    Let us not forget that human’s figure has no straight lines.

    The horizontal lines make an impression of rest, peace. A little bit bent ones symbolize languor, tiredness and relaxation…
    We achieve the same effect of calmness, home comfort, conservatism, sometimes - old-fashionedness, when we use the horizontal lines in the dress.

    Vertical lines are the basis of the composition, producing an impression of stability.
    Using them in dress, we visually make the model higher and decrease the figure’s fullness. There is an optical effect that vertical lines of a figure visually seem to be bigger, then the same ones that lie horizontally.

    5677.jpg



    Diagonal lines help to cover the whole picture by sight. They attach dynamics to the image, symbolize movement, combine parts of the picture.
    All these effects are often used in dress, gestures, poses while creating the composition of the photograph.
    The dresses, where symmetry and diagonals are used, look very elegant and hide exterior defects. The rhythm is felt in such a dress.
    The reasons of such a perception are connected with the everyday life observations. They are corresponding to western people’s perception, for whom it is usual to read composition from left to right and from top to bottom. The image becomes easily to read if its composition center is placed in the left top part of the photograph.

    5303.jpg



    The diagonal, which goes from left to right and leads into the composition, causes a feeling of tension, activity and sometimes is called a diagonal of fight.
    3895.jpg


    The diagonal, going from left top to bottom right corner is called “falling” and the one going from bottom left to top right corner is a “rising” diagonal.

    Moving up along the falling diagonal causes tension. According to the same principle, the turn of the head to the right in a photograph for western people looks like a turn towards the viewer, and the turn to the left – as a turn away from the viewer.

    3144.jpg



    Accents in dress are also placed in the left top corner or at bottom right.
    5292.jpg



    But for some eastern nations where writing and reading processes are using other directions, these rules don’t work.


    To be continued…
  • jsedlakjsedlak Shotgun Poster Posts: 487Registered Users Major grins
    edited December 7, 2007
    wow... such an amazing thread! clap.gif

    I am going to re-read it all and try some new techniques out this weekend. Thank you!
  • darkdragondarkdragon A Sad Panda Posts: 1,051Registered Users Major grins
    edited December 12, 2007
    Homework: Locations
    I know I'm a little behind on this, but I'm just getting started on the monthly assignments. Went out this morning before work to get some photos of some locations at the park. We didnt work on poses or anything like that, just wanted to snap off the location and "position" photos this time. I only had about 15 minutes to do it all.

    #1.
    231614671-M.jpg
    With the model sitting on a table, I was able to get a decent bokeh of the background. In a real shoot, I'd have a reflector with me to give some light to the model's face.
    #2
    231614618-M.jpg
    I think that this red door makes a great background and if I brought the model forward a foot or two it would look a lot better.
    What do you think Yuri, blur the door a little or keep it in focus?
    #3
    231614548-M.jpg
    I think that this repeating wall pattern would make a great background if I brought the model forward a few feet so that I could blur the wall. That would take care of the "lines through the head" issue as well.

    I'm planning to go back to the same place tomorrow morning to work on the next homework in this assignment. Will be using the same model since she's the only person I have access to that early who will cooperate with me ;-)
    ~ Lisa
  • Yuri PautovYuri Pautov Major grins Posts: 1,918Registered Users Major grins
    edited December 14, 2007
    ***
    darkdragon! Thank you for finding time for your homework.
    As we have moved forward from places and backgrounds to compositions, my critique (if you dont mind) will cover more then locations. only.
    darkdragon wrote:

    #1.
    231614671-M.jpg

    try to STUDY
    MA 2.9 Part II. Shooting 5) Tips. Face
    Tips about exterior. Face.

    http://www.dgrin.com/showthread.php?t=71133&page=5

    you'll find there some intereting tips. Specifically about hairdo. Also I think that 'en face' is not the best variant. I'd use here other poses. But yes, its another story...
    Your homework was about location.
    So.
    I think that you see it yourself. Its a good idea to use such a background for this photo. But look... What do we see? yes - Three color spots - red, blue and so to say green. They are too bright cause of color. If you'll make this photo b&w, this dissonance will dissapear, but we will lose much in model's face... So... I think that choosing the background, you MUST HAVE SEEN this spots and choose another point of shooting or make a shot, putting your model closer to this 'blue subject' for example.
    darkdragon wrote:


    #2
    231614618-M.jpg

    Again, try to STUDY our MA.
    These horizontal lines play bad role here - (making face and figure wider)
    darkdragon wrote:


    #3
    231614548-M.jpg

    Same as #2

    My advice - start using simple backgrounds (only color and texture). All these lines... going out of the head...
    You understand me.

    I am sure you have a very beautiful model and you will make fantastic photographs with her.
    Study, shoot and post!
  • darkdragondarkdragon A Sad Panda Posts: 1,051Registered Users Major grins
    edited December 14, 2007
    My advice - start using simple backgrounds (only color and texture). All these lines... going out of the head...
    You understand me.

    I am sure you have a very beautiful model and you will make fantastic photographs with her.
    Study, shoot and post!

    Yuri,

    Thank you for looking and reviewing. I'll work on some new photos tomorrow morning. I have read all of the information you've posted in this thread and the article on hairdos is very interesting. I'm 100% new to photographing people for anything other than newpapers (usually those are quick and not very flattering, hahaha).
    This assignment is definately hard work, but I am determined to pass the class.

    Thank you for all the great tips and information here.

    ~ Lisa
    ~ Lisa
  • Yuri PautovYuri Pautov Major grins Posts: 1,918Registered Users Major grins
    edited December 17, 2007
    MA 2.15 Part II. Composition 4. Part 2
    MA 2.15 Part II. Composition 4. part2
    SYMBOLISM of LINES. Part 2.


    The bend at the end of the line will command the viewer’s look to stop.

    Thus we can control the movement of viewer’s eyes on the photograph, turning up, for example model’s hand or foot.



    5703.jpg



    The wavy, undulating line shows instability, fluidity as it leads the look from one flexure to another.


    4971.jpg

    The are many distinct and easy to recognize curves in human body and they practically always attract attention of the spectator. Wavy lines make the rhythm of the photograph and if they are parallel, this effect becomes stronger.
    Spiral or tortiled lines express tension and vital power. That is why the more ‘twisted’ body of the model is, the more attractive the photo becomes.
    555.jpg



    Again we can control the movement of viewer’s eyes, using different directions of spiral’s line.
    (Up from left to right or down from right to left)

    5378.jpg


    The points that attract maximum attention of the viewer, besides the curves, are the intersection of lines, which put together the parts of the image that lay around them. This can be observed in dress, drapery.
    The human eye, apprehending the subject, first look around its contours, lingering on and returning to more curved or having intersections details.




    5556.jpg


    The recognition can fail if we will show only a part of a subject. Human’s body, being a most significant image, is an exception here.

    When the objects intersect each other, their contours intersect. At the cross points there may appear several lines. But we can talk about only eight sorts of crossings: fork, V-crossing,, T-crossing, arrow, X, K-crossing , peak and multi-crossing. With the help of these components the viewer unconsciously turns flat images into three-dimensional.

    Putting instead of natural component another one, we create an unusual images.

    Penrose triangle shows this effect.


    http://www.at-bristol.org.uk/Optical/ImpossibleTriangle_main.htm

    Some optical effects links.

    Sizes of figures


    http://www.at-bristol.org.uk/Optical/SizeConstancy_main.htm

    Fantastic figure


    http://www.at-bristol.org.uk/Optical/ImpossibleTrident_main.htm

    Faces, having more acute angles, curves, crossings are more photogenic. Pug nose or a bit gibbous nose will attract much more attention then the straight one. The same is with a chin. Acute chin with salient cheek-bones is more photogenic then a round one.





    5601.jpg


    45 degrees incline is the most acceptable. Model’s figure, hands and feet, which are placed under such a degree, look more svelte and photogenic.
    5702.jpg


    Gesture, which goes along a diagonal (and not along the vertical or horizontal lines) looks more expressive.


    4404.jpg


    The object, moving to the frame edge at 45 degrees looks more dynamic. This is because the human spend less efforts looking at horizontal lines then vertical ones. That is why if the model or any other object at the photograph has horizontal and vertical lines, the viewer’s eye first slides across the horizontal and only after them starts vertical ones.

    To be continued….
  • CarloskbcoCarloskbco Big grins Posts: 32Registered Users Big grins
    edited December 18, 2007
    Lots of information...
    I have read all the tips on this "tutorial" (assignment) and wow, there is so much to learn...one thing that drew my attention was: subject on the edge of shadow/sunlight...and went to the backyard of my house, and took my homemade reflectors and this is what I came up with... Rainy season in California nowdays...
    233502418-L.jpg



    233036905-L.jpg


    Minutes after I took these shots it started to rain...the neighbors fence,about 11 feet tall (3.5 m) created shade...

    Carlos
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