Pull backs....lets have some!

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Comments

  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 4,023Registered Users Major grins
    edited August 19, 2014
    Arseny, your bustin my chops!!!!! How about the other post in people? Laughing.gif
  • FoquesFoques He who caN Posts: 1,944Registered Users Major grins
    edited August 19, 2014
    you know I love ya!
    (manly love, obviously!)
    Arseny - the too honest guy.
    My Site
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  • travischancetravischance Major grins Posts: 640Registered Users Major grins
    edited August 19, 2014
    Nice series Charles!
    Travis M. Chance
    twin Mark IV's & a bunch of "L" glass
    sitefacebook
  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 4,023Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 18, 2014
    Just a quick outside group shot from today. ISO 400 f10 at 1/200 Wanted a higher f stop for depth of field and a slightly higher shutter speed for hand holding so ISO 400 worked as highest shutter sync with flash is 1/200 on my Canon. Also used a flash unit into an umbrella off to my left after setting for ambient light then adjusting the flash to that setting.
    i-Zdx7vwM-X2.jpg
  • kdogkdog artistically challenged San Jose, CAPosts: 11,476Administrators moderator
    edited September 23, 2014
    I do my outdoor groups similar, but different. This is a shoot-through umbrella set about 1/2 stop over ambient. It's an Alien Bee AB800 powered by a Vagabond battery supply. Early morning, so the light is at their back. I had them walk forward out of the shadow of the building until the sunlight made a natural hairlight. ISO100, f/5, 1/160s.
    i-xCsLnDs-XL.jpg

    Same formula, but if they're folicly challenged (bald), I have them stay back in the shadow. For this event I had forgotten the Alien Bee and chucked two speedlights in the umbrella instead which also works. Flashes on manual, about 1/2 stop over ambient. ISO100, f/5.6, 1/160s.
    i-mF2WHF4-XL.jpg
  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 4,023Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 23, 2014
    Nice work, thanks for posting and a good MacGyver workaround on the second one.
  • AndeeAndee Food Photography Lover Posts: 123Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 23, 2014
    I like what you did in the second one as the hair/no hair it is not blown out. Nice!
  • AlexSharkAlexShark Canonizer Posts: 198Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 25, 2014
    Awesome thread! I'll have to go through the lot a couple of times. No matter how much talk is done about lighting, there's always something else.

    Now I wish I took more of these, especially with the lighting setup. Oh well, here's some stuff at work:

    745393327_hLFRx-O.jpg
    Photography is about what does not meet the eye
    Be my guest: Alex Braverman Photography
  • AndeeAndee Food Photography Lover Posts: 123Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 25, 2014
    What a cool shoot!
  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 4,023Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 25, 2014
    Great idea, love it and will steal it if you don't mind.
  • AlexSharkAlexShark Canonizer Posts: 198Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 25, 2014
    Hackbone wrote: »
    Great idea, love it and will steal it if you don't mind.

    Steal away! A couple of pointers:

    1. Even the beauty dish does not cover enough ground, unless it is far (you need seriously strong lighting)
    2. You can't freeze the motion of the falling human body with any degree of confidence, unless your flash duration is 1/2000 or faster (or shoot outdoors on a sunny day)
    3. I wouldn't bother with soft boxes, because at these short burst even a millisecond of residual light might ruin the shot.
    4. ISO 100, f8-f11, synch at anything! The set should be dark enough to produce a pitch black frame without the strobes, at these settings

    Bottom line -- Broncolor.
    pros: does all of the above and more
    cons: expensive as hell

    The final produce of the above sequence -- not all that much:

    _M1G8324.jpg

    the title: PRIMEVAL INSTINCT
    Photography is about what does not meet the eye
    Be my guest: Alex Braverman Photography
  • AlexSharkAlexShark Canonizer Posts: 198Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 25, 2014
    Andee wrote: »
    What a cool shoot!

    Thanks Andee!

    I noticed some fractal stuff on your website. I'm getting into it, using Ultra Fractal 5 - the paid version. Will you be willing to share your experience with me?

    I'm not looking to produce stand-alone fractal abstracts. I'm interested in using them as a displace map to overlay some architectural stuff. Heck, maybe even portraits!

    Something like this:

    10480992_10152689808342425_5184202293116603265_n.jpg?oh=4ef73d41e4ec8958f5367d2e0f01d400&oe=548A1491&__gda__=1417832071_9518d6fbd3d50d9138f37a84379907bc
    Photography is about what does not meet the eye
    Be my guest: Alex Braverman Photography
  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 4,023Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 25, 2014
    Alex check out this link. He might have some ideas, brushes that you can use or alter for your needs.
    Woody is quite a character and knows his art and photoshop.

    http://www.templatephotoshop.com/
  • AlexSharkAlexShark Canonizer Posts: 198Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 25, 2014
    Hackbone wrote: »
    Alex check out this link. He might have some ideas, brushes that you can use or alter for your needs.
    Woody is quite a character and knows his art and photoshop.

    http://www.templatephotoshop.com/

    Thanks! Nice sports comps on that site.
    Photography is about what does not meet the eye
    Be my guest: Alex Braverman Photography
  • AndeeAndee Food Photography Lover Posts: 123Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 26, 2014
    Alex I kinda fake my way through the fractal program I use. Sorry not more help on that wish I were more of a brainy person and if I were I would share it with you. Sad to say some of what I did I can not even recreate. Sad but true. I use an old freeware program and mix a little PS with some of them. I wish I had the math skills for some of the more intricate fractal work. That is cool what you have there. I wanted to be able to do the fractal an image but that I think is a paid program and these days no funds for anything.
  • kdogkdog artistically challenged San Jose, CAPosts: 11,476Administrators moderator
    edited October 10, 2014
    Hackbone wrote: »
    Nice work, thanks for posting and a good MacGyver workaround on the second one.
    No more MacGyver! clap.gif Since I've been getting as good results using two Canon 600RT flashes in one umbrella as I do with my Alien Bee/Vagabond for outdoor group photos, I've decided to streamline my kit and just stick to the two speedlights. The "MacGyver" hack Charles referred to above was using a multiclamp to cobble up a couple of flashes when I forgot my Alien Bee one day. But that was cumbersome and finicky. I know they make commercial multi-flash brackets. But since I knew exactly what I wanted, for less than $5 in materials, I made my own.

    I've really grown to despise those adjustable metal hot shoe mounts on almost all commercial flash brackets. So this uses the plastic bases that come with the flashes. They are solid and of course the flash fits and locks perfectly.

    Materials list:
    7"x2"x1/8" band iron
    three 1/4-20 cap screws, 1/2" long.
    a few 1/4" washers

    Oh, and of course you already have the standard umbrella mount which comes with the brass piece.

    Instructions: drill three 1/4" holes in the band iron. One in the center, and two more 2" to either side of the center hole. Assemble. :D

    i-ZhzvrhN-XL.jpg

    i-xvjG5NB-XL.jpg

    I just made this today. Home Depot only had 3/4" screws, so I had to pad the flash base screws with a bunch of washers. I'll replace those with 1/2" screws when I get around to it and also paint the band iron. I have an event in the morning, so this is ready to go. deal.gif
  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 4,023Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 11, 2014
    Great workaround, The canon mounts have plastic threads or they use to. You can purchase Nikon ones if you want to and they have metal threaded inserts. I use a similar rig and it works great except for really bright direct sunlight where I use a White Lighting 1600.
  • kdogkdog artistically challenged San Jose, CAPosts: 11,476Administrators moderator
    edited October 12, 2014
    Thanks, Charles. I was careful not to over-torque the screws into the plastic and it seems solid enough. I was thinking I'd buy a couple of Canon stands that I could dedicate to the bracket, however now it sounds like I should take a look at the Nikon part too. Good to know.
  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 4,023Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 12, 2014
    Joel, if you want to spend some money for a great product here is a link to a mount, about $18 each. These really hold and can be a pain to take the flash off until you get the hang of it.

    http://www.amazon.com/Frio-ENLFRC1A-Shoe-Mount-Tripods/dp/B004CBTCFC

    another one same brand this one is $14 ish.

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Frio-Enlight-Universal-V2/dp/B00DNADZME/ref=pd_sim_p_2?ie=UTF8&refRID=1VC12EDWZ84AZ5X748WK
  • kdogkdog artistically challenged San Jose, CAPosts: 11,476Administrators moderator
    edited October 13, 2014
    Hackbone wrote: »
    These really hold and can be a pain to take the flash off until you get the hang of it.
    Thanks, Charles. The reviews on Amazon mention that issue and at least one review says it's worse with the 600RT's that I use. I think I'll keep in simple and stick with the Canon part. I do wish the Canon part had a metal insert and and the Nikon part sounds good for that reason. But unless the dimensions are *exactly* like the Canon part, I'm not so sure about that either. These flashes are super-expensive and I greatly prefer the precise and secure fit of the Canon part to any of the many aftermarket mounts I've tried so far. I know the hotshoe mount is supposed to be universal, but slight differences in manufacturer specifications seem to make these universal holders a compromise that I'm just not willing to accept any more.
  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 4,023Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 13, 2014
    It is a very snug fit and takes two hands to take it off but it is very, very secure when on. I do like mine and once you get used to it, it does work easy. I also use the RT's on it.
  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 4,023Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 15, 2014
    the set up. one main and reflector, bkg light, two kickers
    1. i-bHLHNLp-X2.jpg

    2. i-GShB2TM-X2.jpg

    3 was with a beauty dish
    3. i-SWsTpvr-X2.jpg

    4 missed the focus a tad shooting at 2.8ish
    4. i-2ppMt8z-X2.jpg

    5. i-VmMGtHR-X2.jpg
  • FoquesFoques He who caN Posts: 1,944Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 15, 2014
    ^ so many questions....

    Where are you shooting from?
    how big is that PLM in the back?
    what glass do you use for this range?
    Arseny - the too honest guy.
    My Site
    My Facebook
  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 4,023Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 15, 2014
    Foques wrote: »
    ^ so many questions....

    Where are you shooting from? She is about 15 feet from me and 6 to 8 ft from bkg.
    how big is that PLM in the back? 64"
    what glass do you use for this range?
    almost always use the 70-200
  • AndeeAndee Food Photography Lover Posts: 123Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 15, 2014
    Oh I miss being able to do portraits! Those are so nice Charles! My favorite is the last one. How beautiful. An art piece for sure!
  • AlexSharkAlexShark Canonizer Posts: 198Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 15, 2014
    Great personality! Charming.
    Photography is about what does not meet the eye
    Be my guest: Alex Braverman Photography
  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 4,023Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 16, 2014
    Thanks all, I had the opportunity as a teacher to see this child over the years and she has had a tough childhood. I hope she will be please to see how beautiful she is.
  • FoquesFoques He who caN Posts: 1,944Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 16, 2014
    Hackbone wrote: »
    almost always use the 70-200

    thank you!

    Man, things I'd do to have that kind of shooting space.. :\
    Arseny - the too honest guy.
    My Site
    My Facebook
  • r3t1awr3ydr3t1awr3yd Lifetime Noob! Posts: 1,000Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 17, 2014
    p867722699-5.jpg?sn=2YH&tk=dF8u59JQU6eWVy9ByukAUR1DsYLpM7WDw3WabhQk7O0=









    p649828371-5.jpg?sn=2YH&tk=SnEsqs_KhOhfvLGOuXqzjIzU4suS58RpIIElnyLjkhw=









    And pull back: (one umbrella camera left, one camera right behind. You can see the umbrella rod of the one on the left and the one on the right is pretty obvious. this is in a garage...)
    p583259539-5.jpg?sn=2YH&tk=JPq7HqJfiSFbFHNKMClTtyYx0S3uC1v6uBchgTkeOsM=






    http://wallydyerphotography.com/blog/2014/10/the-power-of-perspective

    Hi! I'm Wally: website | blog | facebook | IG | scotchNsniff
    Nikon addict. D610, Tok 11-16, Sig 24-35, Nik 24-70/70-200vr
  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 4,023Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 17, 2014
    Love it!!!!!! I know a photographer in Vegas who does all of his portrait work out of his garage and man you should see his work....WOW.
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