Pull backs....lets have some!

1202122232426»

Comments

  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 3,984Registered Users Major grins
    edited May 20, 2016
    Ballerina Art Print
    Sorry for no pull back but the light was a 3x4 soft box on a 45 degree behind the subject. Didn't like the shadow side and a reflector did not give me the results I wanted so I turned and umbrella on and used it as a fill.
  • AndeeAndee Food Photography Lover Posts: 115Registered Users Major grins
    edited May 20, 2016
    What a terrific piece!
  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 3,984Registered Users Major grins
    edited August 26, 2016
    Two from last evening.
    Been awhile but got the chance to got out last evening. Both images with two bare flashes on a stand. Camera at 2.8 iso 100 shutter 1/2500. The flashes were about 5 to 6 feet away from subject and you can see the stand in the lower right corner.

    1.i-kNVWQhP-XL.jpg

    2.i-N9MrHdh-XL.jpg
  • AndeeAndee Food Photography Lover Posts: 115Registered Users Major grins
    edited August 26, 2016
    Great work! Love the settling for those esp for that first one Charles!!
  • ZwellsZwells Big grins Posts: 10Registered Users Big grins
    edited August 31, 2016
    Help with headshots!
    Hey guys and girls i have a question! I'm not very experienced with studio photography, and this coming Sunday my union president asked me to do some head shots for our board, anyways the equipment i have is 2 alien bees (800s), with umbrellas, ( i don't have any soft boxes yet) i have triggers to set off the lights with my camera so my question is what settings and set up can use for these shots does anyone have any examples of the set up and photos with the settings that i can go by? Any help would be greatly appreciated! i shoot with Nikon D750, and I'm guessing i can use my 28mm 1.8 or my 85mm 1.8. headscratch.gif this is my very first time doing head shots. (this job is not paid is just for experience).
    Thank you so much!


    Not sure if anyone want to take a look of my website.
    http://zwellsphotography.com
  • Cygnus StudiosCygnus Studios Commercial Photographer San Francisco's North BayPosts: 2,231Registered Users Major grins
    edited August 31, 2016
    Zwells wrote: »
    Hey guys and girls i have a question! I'm not very experienced with studio photography, and this coming Sunday my union president asked me to do some head shots for our board, anyways the equipment i have is 2 alien bees (800s), with umbrellas, ( i don't have any soft boxes yet) i have triggers to set off the lights with my camera so my question is what settings and set up can use for these shots

    This part of your question is impossible to answer, there are simply too many variables. Size of room, color of room, color of background, any ambient light. Are your umbrellas shoot through or bounce, do you have reflectors, plus dozens of more details that can affect everything.

    That's all before you begin dealing with the possible skin tones and colors of the people and whatever clothing that they may be wearing. Color cast from clothes, walls, etc. can get reflected easily depending on the angle of light.

    Generally if the environment allows and you're not lighting the background in addition to the people a two light system will have your main light directly behind and above camera and the other at camera level either right or left at a 45 degree angle to the person.

    Then you use your modeling light to kind of work the light until it fits.

    The clamshell set up works well for quick and dirty shots. Both lights directly in from of the person 1 light right above (key), 1 light below (about waist level if standing) for fill.

    Specific settings for the lights/camera are just too hard to guess without know far more details. General rule (loose term) of thumb from key to fill ratio is 3 to 1.
    Zwells wrote: »
    i shoot with Nikon D750, and I'm guessing i can use my 28mm 1.8 or my 85mm 1.8.

    This one is easy, use the 85mm.
    Steve

    Website | Gear
  • ZwellsZwells Big grins Posts: 10Registered Users Big grins
    edited August 31, 2016
    the room is banquet size pretty big, i have have a white umbrella and a black one i can reflect of it. i have two reflectors, the only light is florescent light I'm planing on using my black backdrop i also have two flashes. the wall is cream color i will try to practice on my husband ans see how they turn out, thank you for trying to explain. :D
  • Cygnus StudiosCygnus Studios Commercial Photographer San Francisco's North BayPosts: 2,231Registered Users Major grins
    edited August 31, 2016
    Black would not be my first choice. Depending on how much light hits the background you could end up with a cave look. Depending on how the walls look, cream might be the better choice.

    With your current umbrellas, I would suggest putting the bounce back behind and above the camera. This will soften it up quite a bit. Put the shoot through on one side of the camera (I prefer left side, but doesn't matter) and use that to fill and sculpt the face.

    If you need to use the black backdrop, use your flashes to provide some light on it, so that it isn't completely dark. (think grey). Keep the flashes wide and behind the people so they don't cast the color back on the person.
    Steve

    Website | Gear
  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 3,984Registered Users Major grins
    edited August 31, 2016
    Lighting......I would set my main light up as a shoot thru and keep it on a 45 to the subject and feather it a tad toward the front of the subject. (if these are single people shots I would keep the main just out of viewfinder range. With two people you might have to move the main more toward the camera to prevent shadow spill on one of the subjects). I would set my exposure till I am pleased with the result. I would leave my f stop there. Then I would bring my fill in possibly as a shoot thru and put it behind the camera and a tad toward the main and set the power a bit lower and check the screen till you get a pleasing opening of the shadow side of the face. Leave you f stop alone and drop the power on the fill to do this. Do you have a small strobe that you can hit the bkg with? If you do use it and if too much power don't be afraid to put folds of handkerchiefs of it to tone the power down. I would keep my subject about 6 ft from the bkg.

    Posing.....I would have the guys facing the main and the ladies with their backs toward the main and the heads turned back toward the light. It's an old posing rule that does make them look better. I would use the 85 mm lens before the wide angle. Hope that helps.
  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 3,984Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 18, 2016
    Strong sun coming in from the right side, so to open shadows 2 flashes over on left about 6ft away. Add some clouds and that is it.

    In the first image flash was all ready flashing to open shadows.

    1.i-JwcdzCL-L.jpg

    2.i-DcDhdNC-L.jpg
  • AndeeAndee Food Photography Lover Posts: 115Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 18, 2016
    Thanks for sharing Charles! I love adding clouds to images. Very nice!

    Or should I say use to when I was able to shoot more!
Sign In or Register to comment.