Frame Fillers - How To

124

Comments

  • Tim KamppinenTim Kamppinen Major grins Posts: 816Registered Users Major grins
    edited August 26, 2011
    Hey that's neat, what a bargain! Nice shot, love the lashes. Would you mind sharing your skin smoothing technique?

    Shooting at 1.4! The skin was mostly out of focus in this shot out of the camera. I did use Imagenomic's Portraiture plugin as well though. It works wonders for skin smoothing and it's very adjustable as to how much detail and texture you want to retain. This shot does look really smooth at web resolution but if you saw the original file up close there is still skin texture visible on the in-focus areas of her face.
  • QarikQarik Krazy Korean Posts: 4,938Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 1, 2011
    Shooting at 1.4! The skin was mostly out of focus in this shot out of the camera. I did use Imagenomic's Portraiture plugin as well though. It works wonders for skin smoothing and it's very adjustable as to how much detail and texture you want to retain. This shot does look really smooth at web resolution but if you saw the original file up close there is still skin texture visible on the in-focus areas of her face.

    tim, it is a stunning shot but it totally looks like mannequin
    D700, D600
    14-24 24-70 70-200mm (vr2)
    85 and 50 1.4
    45 PC and sb910 x2
    http://www.danielkimphotography.com
  • jmphotocraftjmphotocraft GWC for hire Posts: 2,953Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 1, 2011
    Qarik wrote: »
    tim, it is a stunning shot but it totally looks like mannequin

    who cares? It is a shot that her parents will never be able to reproduce. That makes it priceless and irreplaceable.
    -Jack

    An "accurate" reproduction of a scene and a good photograph are often two different things.
  • Tim KamppinenTim Kamppinen Major grins Posts: 816Registered Users Major grins
    edited September 11, 2011
    Here's another with the Rokinon 85 at 1.4:

    i-VTSvgL3-X2.jpg
  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 3,975Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 20, 2011
    Love those Tim.
  • Bend The LightBend The Light Bend The Light Posts: 1,887Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 20, 2011
    I've been trying these since I got the 50mm 1.8...my daughter makes a good subject.

    6249361211_43ffa2d901_b.jpg
    You mean me? by http://bendthelight.me.uk, on Flickr

    6201104640_bc6755a2c8_b.jpg
    Annie in 50mm by http://bendthelight.me.uk, on Flickr
  • MeurycMeuryc Big grins Posts: 13Registered Users Big grins
    edited October 28, 2011
    Are you done yet?
    This may be the single best thread I have found to date. I have always preferred wildlife and landscape photography. My daughter refused to face the light so I gave up and turned her around. I can't complain too much as she is usually a very willing model. I see the potential in this style/pose and plan to work at it a bit more.

    No cropping. I over exposed her eyes a bit in LR so they had color again.

    1000000310-M.jpg
  • jeffreaux2jeffreaux2 Grinning...and bearing it Posts: 4,761Registered Users Major grins
    edited October 31, 2011
    Meuryc wrote: »
    This may be the single best thread I have found to date. I have always preferred wildlife and landscape photography. My daughter refused to face the light so I gave up and turned her around. I can't complain too much as she is usually a very willing model. I see the potential in this style/pose and plan to work at it a bit more.

    No cropping. I over exposed her eyes a bit in LR so they had color again.

    1000000310-M.jpg


    Thats a great shot!....Try using a $2 piece of white foam core to bounce some sunlight back into her face!

    Keep shootin'mwink.gif
  • sjconstsjconst Big grins Posts: 18Registered Users Big grins
    edited November 7, 2011
    I was just reading this really useful post when my unfortunate husband got in from work. I took the opportunity to practice, this is my first attempt at a frame filler. I have a full bodied camera and a 85mm, so even up on a chair, I had to have him get on his knees to get this angle (I am really really short!). I am thinking that my second lens purchase is coming up soon or I may need a tall ladder?

    i-3ZHWMKT-M.jpg
  • anonymouscubananonymouscuban Inner Tube Pilot Posts: 4,709Super Moderators moderator
    edited November 7, 2011
    Tall ladder. Cheaper than a new lens and you can't beat the 85 mm for portrait work.
    "I'm not yelling. I'm Cuban. That's how we talk."

    Moderator of the People and Go Figure forums

    My Smug Site
  • D3SshooterD3Sshooter Pixel Addict Posts: 1,187Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 26, 2011
    "Gear:
    I currently shoot a Canon crop body (50d). I have found on shots of this type it is best to shoot them at least at a 50mm focal legth. For you full framers that equates to 80mm. The problem with using a wider lens...or shorter focal length is that it tends to distort the facial features. Of course a longer focal length can be use, if you have room to put it to use.
    "


    Jeff, I think you have it wrong. Lenses are always marked on the real focus length based on a full frame or 35mm film. So , a 50mm lens on a FF is 50mm. A 50mm lens on a camera with NO full-frame needs to be multiplied by its crop factor . In most cases a 1.5 value will close, hence the 50mm becomes 75mm.
    A photographer without a style, is like a pub without beer
  • Bend The LightBend The Light Bend The Light Posts: 1,887Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 26, 2011
    D3Sshooter wrote: »
    "Gear:
    I currently shoot a Canon crop body (50d). I have found on shots of this type it is best to shoot them at least at a 50mm focal legth. For you full framers that equates to 80mm. The problem with using a wider lens...or shorter focal length is that it tends to distort the facial features. Of course a longer focal length can be use, if you have room to put it to use.
    "


    Jeff, I think you have it wrong. Lenses are always marked on the real focus length based on a full frame or 35mm film. So , a 50mm lens on a FF is 50mm. A 50mm lens on a camera with NO full-frame needs to be multiplied by its crop factor . In most cases a 1.5 value will close, hence the 50mm becomes 75mm.

    The 50d has a crop factor of 1.6...so 50mm x 1.6 = 80mm.
  • jmphotocraftjmphotocraft GWC for hire Posts: 2,953Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 26, 2011
    D3Sshooter wrote: »
    "Gear:
    I currently shoot a Canon crop body (50d). I have found on shots of this type it is best to shoot them at least at a 50mm focal legth. For you full framers that equates to 80mm. The problem with using a wider lens...or shorter focal length is that it tends to distort the facial features. Of course a longer focal length can be use, if you have room to put it to use.
    "


    Jeff, I think you have it wrong. Lenses are always marked on the real focus length based on a full frame or 35mm film. So , a 50mm lens on a FF is 50mm. A 50mm lens on a camera with NO full-frame needs to be multiplied by its crop factor . In most cases a 1.5 value will close, hence the 50mm becomes 75mm.

    If you simply want to have a pedantic argument, please go here: www.dpreview.com.
    -Jack

    An "accurate" reproduction of a scene and a good photograph are often two different things.
  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 3,975Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 26, 2011
    Hey, it's close enough for government contract work.
  • Tim KamppinenTim Kamppinen Major grins Posts: 816Registered Users Major grins
    edited November 27, 2011
    D3Sshooter wrote: »
    "Gear:
    I currently shoot a Canon crop body (50d). I have found on shots of this type it is best to shoot them at least at a 50mm focal legth. For you full framers that equates to 80mm. The problem with using a wider lens...or shorter focal length is that it tends to distort the facial features. Of course a longer focal length can be use, if you have room to put it to use.
    "


    Jeff, I think you have it wrong. Lenses are always marked on the real focus length based on a full frame or 35mm film. So , a 50mm lens on a FF is 50mm. A 50mm lens on a camera with NO full-frame needs to be multiplied by its crop factor . In most cases a 1.5 value will close, hence the 50mm becomes 75mm.

    Jeff was just saying that since he's on a crop body shooting a 50mm, to get the same results on a full frame camera you would have to use an 80mm (because of the 1.6 crop factor pointed out above... the Nikon crop factor is 1.5) or something close (like an 85).
  • jmphotocraftjmphotocraft GWC for hire Posts: 2,953Registered Users Major grins
    edited December 2, 2011
    Got one
    Used this thread for a recent Senior Portrait, thanks again!

    IMG7672-X2.jpg
    -Jack

    An "accurate" reproduction of a scene and a good photograph are often two different things.
  • XoZeXoZe Big grins Posts: 18Registered Users Big grins
    edited December 3, 2011
    1051066924_Dsopu-L.jpg
  • M38A1M38A1 Curious. Very curious. Posts: 1,313Registered Users Major grins
    edited December 5, 2011
    This has been a great learning thread....

    Now, go away rain and bring on the sunshine! I want to try this!!!!


    .
  • LilyJackLilyJack Big grins Posts: 25Registered Users Big grins
    edited January 2, 2012
    M38A1 wrote: »
    This has been a great learning thread....

    Now, go away rain and bring on the sunshine! I want to try this!!!!


    .

    I love this thread and these types of shots. I llike this angle and often try it with kids too, although it's not usually a complete frame filler. (First image of child) But the second one is as shot with no cropping for a HS senior and another two of seniors (citizens - Slight cropping) but in portrait orientations. Do you think that orientation works too? The tips on getting both eyes in focus are very helpful. The first of the child is a little soft on the eyes methinks.

    1171371721_eYNrj-M-1.jpg

    1086767008_p7BqV-M-3.jpg

    i-FcBj4jz-M.jpg


    [IMG][/img]i-Ffp3nJC-M.jpg


    Kate
  • jeffreaux2jeffreaux2 Grinning...and bearing it Posts: 4,761Registered Users Major grins
    edited January 3, 2012
    LilyJack wrote: »
    I love this thread and these types of shots. I llike this angle and often try it with kids too, although it's not usually a complete frame filler. (First image of child) But the second one is as shot with no cropping for a HS senior and another two of seniors (citizens - Slight cropping) but in portrait orientations. Do you think that orientation works too? The tips on getting both eyes in focus are very helpful. The first of the child is a little soft on the eyes methinks.


    Kate

    Hi Kate and welcome to Dgrin.

    My personal preference for this type of shot is the landscape orientation. I think it is a fresher look and makes for a more interesting composition. Of your 4 examples, wouldn't you agree that the lone landscape frame is more intimate?

    It would be even stronger if it werent tilted. In that case you could set up a rule of thirds composition and get the camera in there even closer......making for a very provacative portrait.

    Thanks for sharing!
  • jeffreaux2jeffreaux2 Grinning...and bearing it Posts: 4,761Registered Users Major grins
    edited January 3, 2012
    Jeff was just saying that since he's on a crop body shooting a 50mm, to get the same results on a full frame camera you would have to use an 80mm (because of the 1.6 crop factor pointed out above... the Nikon crop factor is 1.5) or something close (like an 85).


    Yup.

    Thats what I was saying.


    Sorry. I thought this was a simple concept! :D


    In any event, you want to be sure you aren't using a lens that will introduce distortion. A 50mm on a crop body (or 80mm on full framer) will put the camera only a couple or three feet from the subject for this shot.thumb.gif
  • LilyJackLilyJack Big grins Posts: 25Registered Users Big grins
    edited January 3, 2012
    Thanks for the tips Jeff. I agree the horizontal does look fresher, more modern. I'll have to work on my positioning too because when I look back over the examples here, where the iris lands in relation to the bottom lid seems key...
  • tPietschtPietsch Strobist grinner Posts: 11Registered Users Big grins
    edited January 27, 2012
    heres two head shots i did with my 50mm 1.4g at 1.4, i set up my ab1600 strobe with 47" octabox boomed high above the subject for the lighting. i also used a variable ND filter achieve the shallow depth of field with such a bright strobe

    ERik

    Patrick
    Flickr
    The Rebel Tribe
    Cameras: Nikon D7000, Nikon D40x, Fuji instax
    Lenses: Nikon 50mm 1.4g, Nikon 35mm 1.8, Tokina 11-16 2.8
    Other Gear: ab1600, 47" Octabox
  • jmphotocraftjmphotocraft GWC for hire Posts: 2,953Registered Users Major grins
    edited January 27, 2012
    Very nice. Tough to nail these shots at f/1.4, and you did it. Great light too.
    -Jack

    An "accurate" reproduction of a scene and a good photograph are often two different things.
  • tPietschtPietsch Strobist grinner Posts: 11Registered Users Big grins
    edited January 29, 2012
    i know all about that haha especially cause i had a varibale ND filter i had to twist after i caught focus on the subject, ontop of that i was shooting handheld. i had to shoot about 12 photos before i finally got it in focus. thanks! yeah the octabox is an amazing lighting source
    Flickr
    The Rebel Tribe
    Cameras: Nikon D7000, Nikon D40x, Fuji instax
    Lenses: Nikon 50mm 1.4g, Nikon 35mm 1.8, Tokina 11-16 2.8
    Other Gear: ab1600, 47" Octabox
  • jeffreaux2jeffreaux2 Grinning...and bearing it Posts: 4,761Registered Users Major grins
    edited March 16, 2012
    Very nice. Tough to nail these shots at f/1.4, and you did it. Great light too.

    I totally agree.

    Great job!!!clap.gif
  • mjoshi123mjoshi123 Major grins Posts: 216Registered Users Major grins
    edited March 27, 2012
    jeffreaux2 wrote: »
    This is a shot that I often try to include in my senior portfolios. These show super well in wallet sized prints. Heatherfeather suggested I fess up on exactly how I do them. So....


    Gear:
    I currently shoot a Canon crop body (50d). I have found on shots of this type it is best to shoot them at least at a 50mm focal legth. For you full framers that equates to 80mm. The problem with using a wider lens...or shorter focal length is that it tends to distort the facial features. Of course a longer focal length can be use, if you have room to put it to use.

    Both of these shot with the Canon 17-55F2.8IS lens and 50D camera at 50mm F3.5.


    Posing / Camera angle:
    The easiest way to do the shot is to have the subject seated on the ground. If you remain standing for the shot, the angle allows the ground to be used as a backdrop. This is a super simple way to get an uncluttered backdrop. Brick pavers, concrete, grass, and even asphalt look great as a backdrop.

    This first shot was with the Canon 50D and Canon 50mm F1.4 lens at F1.8. The second uses the Canon 17-55 F2.8IS lens.

    Lighting:
    This is the super easy part. I have never added any artificial light to shots of this type. To get great lighting all that is needed is the proper location. In late afternoon or early morning, get on the shaded side of a wall or building. With the subject looking up at you that big blue sky provides all the needed light. Midday? Get under a porch, overhang, or garage. Seat the subject near the edge of where the sunlit and shadowed area on the ground are adjacent to one another. Keep your subject in the shade but again...have them looking up at the bright blue sky.

    Both shot with the Canon 50d and Canon 17-55 F2.8IS.


    Composition:
    You will have to shoot a few of these before you get comfortable with what works for you. I try to avoid centering and usually weigh my subject to one side or the other of the frame. I prefer it when I have lined up so that the head takes up roughly 2/3 of the width of the frame and the eyes are located roughly 1/3 from the top edge of the frame. Yes. The rule of thirds applies to portraiture.

    This one takes a slightly different approach. Here, to use the blooming azalea shrubs as a backdrop the subject is standing and I have elevated myself on a step ladder. I recommend always having a 3 step ladder on hand for location shooting.

    Canon 50d and Canon 50mm F1.4 lens at F2.0. Note the slither of white showing just under the iris of her eyes...shaped like a canoe.


    The right subject:
    This isn't for everyone. It takes a special sort of person to feel comfortable with a DSLR and a 77mm diameter lens just a few short feet from their face. Reserve these types of shots for those folks who are comfortable in front of the camera. Getting this close to a subject who is camera shy can onle make them more so. Don't be pushy!

    Again, another variation. In this shot the subject is standing just inside an open garage door. The open shade, and light reflecting from the concrete apron in front of her act as a huge softbox. I have located myself on a step ladder at quite a distance away in order to utilize a long focal length. A nice compromise if you have a "camera shy" subject.

    Canon 50d and Canon 70-200 F2.8 L IS at 200mm and F4.0.


    I have found that the Canon 17-55 F2.8IS can give me reliably crisp images at any aperture at the distances required for these shots. It is THE lens to own for a Canon crop sensor camera. However, you don't have to own expensive gear to get the shot. This last shot was taken with a Canon 400d XTi and the Canon "nifty-fifty F1.8 lens.


    It's all in the eyes:
    Be aware that at least half of the subjects I have used this method with have had sensitive eyes. Asking them to keep looking at the sky (even though the sun is not in sight) while you fidget with lenses or camera settings is asking too much. Instead, get everyone in position and have them close their eyes until you are ready. Give them a three count to open their eyes and shoot the image on 4. Big WIDE open eyes look much better than a case of the squints. Also. experiment with tilting the chin to get the iris to just rest on the bottom eyelid...or go for the "canoe eyes" for that super feminine look.


    Questions?

    Comments?

    Concerns?

    Lets hear 'em....


    273092978_bTiEg-L-4.jpg



    Thank your for such a great and simple writeup, much appreciated. I'd add just one more thing - keep it simple and have fun. Dont stress out yourself as that will feed into others around you and will reflect in your pictures. Here is one which I took couple of years back of my two boys with 50mm F1.8, not exactly a frame filler but shot with natural light on Canon 20D.

    931477457_NhM7B-XL.jpg

    And this two are more recent ones,
    This one employed similar angle of frame fill but in this case he was sleeping on a pillow instead of siting or standing - so there you go similar angle but different posture.
    TestShots110731IMG1511-Edit-XL.jpg

    Same thing not exact definition of frame filler
    Cait-Weds111125IMG8367-XL.jpg
  • RachAllenPhotoRachAllenPhoto Big grins Posts: 16Registered Users Big grins
    edited July 22, 2012
    Anyone tried this with "larger" subjects? I would think that doing this from above would slim the face as well, right?
    Allen and Rachel
    http://www.rachelallenphotography.com
    Imagine...
  • PedalGirlPedalGirl Major grins Posts: 794Registered Users Major grins
    edited July 30, 2012
    Thanks to this thread, I got this awesome shot of Bridget...

    Corinne-061-Edit-Edit-L.jpg
    Pho-tog-ra-pher (n) 1. One who practices photography 2. one obsessed with capturing life with their camera. 3. One who eats, sleeps and breathes photographs. 4. One who sees the world in 4x6.
    www.lisaspeakmanphotography.com
  • RachAllenPhotoRachAllenPhoto Big grins Posts: 16Registered Users Big grins
    edited August 2, 2012
    Here are a few that my wife and I took of each other...
    Allen and Rachel
    http://www.rachelallenphotography.com
    Imagine...
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