Frame Fillers - How To

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  • Tim KamppinenTim Kamppinen Major grins Posts: 816 Major grins
    edited April 11, 2011
    DavidTO wrote: »
    Have you ever tried using an extension tube to up the bokeh? I use that for shooting flowers, and never thought about shooting an actual person with it, but while on a recent outing I was showing Travis the extension tube and snapped this one quickly.

    Hey, that's pretty sweet. I have some very basic extension tubes that I've used for macro shots, but I never thought to use it with a long tele lens for a portrait like that. I might have to give it a shot with my Nikon 80-200 and see what I can get...
  • jeffreaux2jeffreaux2 Grinning...and bearing it Posts: 4,761 Major grins
    edited April 11, 2011
    Thank you for this thread! I'm very new to portrait photography and these "how to" posts are really helpful!

    I talked my husband into posing for me. Feedback is appreciated!


    I think you did a great job!clap.gifclapclap.gif

    But....

    Be careful of all that black! The levels histogram in photoshop shows that a good portion of the blacks are out of range....or "plugged". This can be corrected by setting a black point during editing.

    1248548311_RJXDy-XL.jpg

    Also....your hubby is like several folks I have photographed in that one eye appears much smaller than the other. Watch out for that natural tendency of his and be sure he is opening his eyes up for the shot!thumb.gif
  • christinamaechristinamae Major grins Posts: 484 Major grins
    edited April 11, 2011
    jeffreaux2 wrote: »
    I think you did a great job!clap.gifclapclap.gif

    But....

    Be careful of all that black! The levels histogram in photoshop shows that a good portion of the blacks are out of range....or "plugged". This can be corrected by setting a black point during editing.

    Also....your hubby is like several folks I have photographed in that one eye appears much smaller than the other. Watch out for that natural tendency of his and be sure he is opening his eyes up for the shot!thumb.gif

    Thank you for this! It's really helpful and I'll go look at the original file.
  • NikolaiNikolai Darth SLR Posts: 19,316 Major grins
    edited April 11, 2011
    Hopefully not too late... A couple of frame fillers (model: Lury):

    #1: IMG_7313.jpg

    1064355577_SKKto-XL.jpg

    #2: IMG_7335.jpg

    1058184053_nrGxY-XL.jpg

    This post was made with the assistance of Star*Explorer
    "May the f/stop be with you!"
    Star*Explorer: on Dgrin, home; Master Class: open;
    Class is in session, My Facebook, @DarthSLR, #NiksTips
    member: NAPP, PPA, partner: Adobe
    Comprehending life, universe and everything - one pixel at a time
  • jeffreaux2jeffreaux2 Grinning...and bearing it Posts: 4,761 Major grins
    edited April 14, 2011
    Nikolai wrote: »
    Hopefully not too late... A couple of frame fillers (model: Lury):

    #1: IMG_7313.jpg



    #2: IMG_7335.jpg



    This post was made with the assistance of Star*Explorer

    Its never too late to share a good looking photograph Nik!

    I like the low key approack. Thanks for sharing.
  • Bryce WilsonBryce Wilson Wants More Glass Posts: 1,584 Major grins
    edited April 14, 2011
    My Attempt
    I set out to somewhat mimic your style but had a couple of curves thrown my way and had to improvise a bit.

    It was a rather windy spring day and we had some rain on and off. I had picked out a spot for my daughter to sit and being as I'm rather tall didn't think I would need anything to stand on. As luck would have it the area that I had in mind was quite wet and I just couldn't get a 12-year-old girl to sit in a puddle. We had to get her off to dance class so rather than waste a trip, this is what I came up with.

    I think I need to pay more attention to the eyes next time and get them open farther. So, at least I learned something for the next outing in hopefully better conditions.

    Shot f2.8/3000 105mm macro lens. Natural light. Soft light filter applied in Photoshop.

    Meraya
  • HackboneHackbone Always learning Posts: 3,975 Major grins
    edited April 14, 2011
    Cool thread Jeff!!
  • jeffreaux2jeffreaux2 Grinning...and bearing it Posts: 4,761 Major grins
    edited April 15, 2011
    I set out to somewhat mimic your style but had a couple of curves thrown my way and had to improvise a bit.

    It was a rather windy spring day and we had some rain on and off. I had picked out a spot for my daughter to sit and being as I'm rather tall didn't think I would need anything to stand on. As luck would have it the area that I had in mind was quite wet and I just couldn't get a 12-year-old girl to sit in a puddle. We had to get her off to dance class so rather than waste a trip, this is what I came up with.

    I think I need to pay more attention to the eyes next time and get them open farther. So, at least I learned something for the next outing in hopefully better conditions.

    Shot f2.8/3000 105mm macro lens. Natural light. Soft light filter applied in Photoshop.


    Bryce....

    This is an entirely different shot that what I have tried to describe. Her face is sidelit...rather than having the sky light her full on as she looks up at the camera. What you have wound up with is side lighting and "racoon" eyes. Also...take a few steps closer to the subject. Fill the frame!:D


    Keep trying though...and thanks for sharing!thumb.gif


    As a side note....

    I love to use the texture of brick for backgrounds...but....be very careful about the way her head is turned and the direction of the light. The daylight here is bouncing an orange glow off tha wall and creating some strange skin casts. There are several ways to handle this. Can you guess how?ne_nau.gif
  • Bryce WilsonBryce Wilson Wants More Glass Posts: 1,584 Major grins
    edited April 16, 2011
    jeffreaux2 wrote: »
    Bryce....

    I love to use the texture of brick for backgrounds...but....be very careful about the way her head is turned and the direction of the light. The daylight here is bouncing an orange glow off tha wall and creating some strange skin casts. There are several ways to handle this. Can you guess how?ne_nau.gif

    Well, now that the shot is in the can, turning the image into black and white does get rid of the orange cast. I think I might like the image better in black and white now that I look at it. I would imagine shooting a white card and setting WB prior to shooting might help remove the cast at the camera.

    The deck in the back of the house was dry and in shade. I took another stab at it. Not thrilled with it, but am getting closer.

    Thanks for all the time your putting in to this thread.
  • jeffreaux2jeffreaux2 Grinning...and bearing it Posts: 4,761 Major grins
    edited April 16, 2011
    Well, now that the shot is in the can, turning the image into black and white does get rid of the orange cast. I think I might like the image better in black and white now that I look at it. I would imagine shooting a white card and setting WB prior to shooting might help remove the cast at the camera.

    Converting to BW is one fix...and a simple one!!!

    but...

    The natural light is coming in perpendicular to the wall. Turning her chin away from the wall will put more of that clean light on her face rather than the reflected...orange light from the wall. The bonus will be that in turning her head slightly you can set up a classic "short lighting" patern with natural light. You will have to rotate around a tad with the camera to compose her face properly, but it should only be a slight adjustment....you still want to shoot as parallel to the wall as you are able....to throw it out of focus.

    A custom white balance and grey card will be of little use since only part of her face is recieving the orange reflected light.

    I often use a speedlight and shoot through umbrella on similar shots and use the flash as a key light to short light the subject. By dialing down the amount of ambient contribution I can "over power" any color casts with the flash.

    The deck in the back of the house was dry and in shade. I took another stab at it. Not thrilled with it, but am getting closer.

    Thanks for all the time your putting in to this thread.


    I like it.

    Dont get stuck in 4x5 ratios.

    Divide it up in thirds vertically and horizontally. The verticle part you got....horizontal?...Crop to put her eyes roughly on that upper third horizontal line.deal.gif
  • VayCayMomVayCayMom making real life prettier Posts: 1,869 Major grins
    edited May 19, 2011
    Thank you Jeff for this personal instruction and GOSH is your daughter ever beautiful!bowdown.gif
    Trudy
    www.CottageInk.smugmug.com

    NIKON D700
  • TmetroffTmetroff Big grins Posts: 92 Big grins
    edited May 20, 2011
    Thank you for this post!! I cant wait to try this shot out.
  • jeffreaux2jeffreaux2 Grinning...and bearing it Posts: 4,761 Major grins
    edited May 20, 2011
    VayCayMom wrote: »
    Thank you Jeff for this personal instruction and GOSH is your daughter ever beautiful!bowdown.gif



    :D

    Aaaw....Thanks for being so kind.thumb.gif
  • jeffreaux2jeffreaux2 Grinning...and bearing it Posts: 4,761 Major grins
    edited May 20, 2011
    Tmetroff wrote: »
    Thank you for this post!! I cant wait to try this shot out.


    Be sure to share the results!thumb.gif
  • jschoenrjschoenr Big grins Posts: 17 Big grins
    edited May 20, 2011
    Thanks for this awesome thread! Here is my first attempt (50D with 85mm f/1.8 - stopped down to f/2.2-f/2.8):
    1. Sam
    IMG_2079%20copy.jpg

    2.
    IMG_2102%20copy.jpg

    3.
    IMG_2091%20copy.jpg
  • DSFotoDSFoto Beginner grinner Posts: 9 Beginner grinner
    edited May 21, 2011
    Hello!

    My name is Daniel. I live in Sweden, and am new to this forum. I thought I´d do my first posts here in this thread. Hope you like them.
    Best regards/Daniel

    _MG_77782d.jpg

    DSC_0117.jpg

    DSC_00502BW.jpg

    DSC_0068BW.jpg
  • briandelionbriandelion Grin Reaper Posts: 512 Major grins
    edited May 21, 2011
    DSFoto wrote: »
    Hello!

    My name is Daniel. I live in Sweden, and am new to this forum. I thought I´d do my first posts here in this thread. Hope you like them.
    Best regards/Daniel


    Excellent work. Great character studies. thumb.gif
    "Photography is not about the thing photographed.
    It is about how that thing looks photographed." Garry Winogrand


    Avatar credit: photograph by Duane Michals- picture of me, 'Smash Palace' album
  • DSFotoDSFoto Beginner grinner Posts: 9 Beginner grinner
    edited May 21, 2011
    Excellent work. Great character studies. thumb.gif

    Thanks! Glad to hear:-)

    Best regards/Daniel
  • jeffreaux2jeffreaux2 Grinning...and bearing it Posts: 4,761 Major grins
    edited May 22, 2011
    jschoenr wrote: »
    Thanks for this awesome thread! Here is my first attempt (50D with 85mm f/1.8 - stopped down to f/2.2-f/2.8):
    Sam





    Welcome to Dgrin and thanks for sharing the photographs.

    Of the three I like the second one best. The framing and focus works well.thumb.gif


    C&C

    IMHO the first two need some adjustment on white balance. They appear too cool....and too magenta to my eye. The skin texture on the third image appears to have been lost to overprocessing....err....over smoothing. It's easy to over smooth....but only takes a few seconds more to do corrections that retain at least some texture. There are many methods...patch tool....clone stamp (my fave) etc......find one that works for you and practice til its perfect.:D
  • jeffreaux2jeffreaux2 Grinning...and bearing it Posts: 4,761 Major grins
    edited May 22, 2011
    DSFoto wrote: »
    Hello!

    My name is Daniel. I live in Sweden, and am new to this forum. I thought I´d do my first posts here in this thread. Hope you like them.
    Best regards/Daniel








    Welcome to Dgrin Daniel. Of the images you've posted I really like the third one. It is a very intimate and provacative portrait. Well done!thumb.gif
  • DSFotoDSFoto Beginner grinner Posts: 9 Beginner grinner
    edited May 22, 2011
    jeffreaux2 wrote: »
    Welcome to Dgrin Daniel. Of the images you've posted I really like the third one. It is a very intimate and provacative portrait. Well done!thumb.gif

    Thanks! Glad you like it:-)
    It´s a pic of my wife:-)

    Best regards/Daniel
  • jmphotocraftjmphotocraft GWC for hire Posts: 2,952 Major grins
    edited May 24, 2011
    Can I play too?
    Teddy2011.JPG

    Thanks for a great thread, Jeff. I've been admiring your work here for a while.
    -Jack

    An "accurate" reproduction of a scene and a good photograph are often two different things.
  • ShimaShima k3npo Posts: 2,603 Major grins
    edited May 24, 2011
    Great advice here Jeff, very well written, I may try this out on my next engagement session shoot next month :)
  • jeffreaux2jeffreaux2 Grinning...and bearing it Posts: 4,761 Major grins
    edited June 23, 2011

    Thanks for a great thread, Jeff. I've been admiring your work here for a while.


    Wow...Im flattered! Thanks so much.thumb.gif


    ...and the example you have posted is perfect. Nice shootin'.:D
  • jeffreaux2jeffreaux2 Grinning...and bearing it Posts: 4,761 Major grins
    edited June 23, 2011
    Shima wrote: »
    Great advice here Jeff, very well written, I may try this out on my next engagement session shoot next month :)


    Okay, its next month already....let's see the photos!mwink.gif
  • Bryce WilsonBryce Wilson Wants More Glass Posts: 1,584 Major grins
    edited June 23, 2011
    Glad you posted! I had just noticed recently that you hadn't posted in a bit and was concerned things weren't going well with the issue you were dealing with. I see from the other thread that things are going well so far, and it is very good to hear. I'm dealing with something similar with my #2 (I call him that as although not related, he's like my second son) So far things seem to be going in a positive direction on that front too and pray both of them continue in that direction.

    I have found myself using the horizontal crop that you have detailed in this thread for your outdoor shoots in some of my studio work. It has become one of my favorites for head shots and I thank you for introducing it to me. I'm at the point that I include one in almost every session. Although not yet to your skill level, I think they are getting better. Even though I get the occasional "Why is her head cut off like that?" comment, once I have the "The focus is supposed to be on the eyes and that makes them pop off the page" conversation MOST people get it and I will keep shooting it and trying to improve.

    Here is my latest attempt. I'm mostly happy with it, but am sure it could be improved.

    Circumspect
  • jeffreaux2jeffreaux2 Grinning...and bearing it Posts: 4,761 Major grins
    edited June 27, 2011
    Glad you posted! I had just noticed recently that you hadn't posted in a bit and was concerned things weren't going well with the issue you were dealing with. I see from the other thread that things are going well so far, and it is very good to hear. I'm dealing with something similar with my #2 (I call him that as although not related, he's like my second son) So far things seem to be going in a positive direction on that front too and pray both of them continue in that direction.

    I have found myself using the horizontal crop that you have detailed in this thread for your outdoor shoots in some of my studio work. It has become one of my favorites for head shots and I thank you for introducing it to me. I'm at the point that I include one in almost every session. Although not yet to your skill level, I think they are getting better. Even though I get the occasional "Why is her head cut off like that?" comment, once I have the "The focus is supposed to be on the eyes and that makes them pop off the page" conversation MOST people get it and I will keep shooting it and trying to improve.

    Here is my latest attempt. I'm mostly happy with it, but am sure it could be improved.


    Thanks for your thoughts and prayers. Ill certainly keep you and your family in my prayers as well. thumb.gif

    The portrait is lovely. It appears a little soft, but I am positive that this is due to the way you attached it in the forum. The background choice is a perfect companion to her glowing skin. I think its just about perfect. You could even play with cropping in a tad closer by cropping some more from the top and both sides. For the sake of improvement...maybe...just maybe...it would be better if all of the hair beads were in focus. In a studio environment (which I know nothing about) it just might be doable.

    I am normally not a fan of studio work. I have nothing against it or those who are fans, it just isnt for me. The nearness...and intimacy...of shots like this....nuetralize my usual judgment. The sterility is gone.thumb.gif
  • CASowersCASowers Major grins Posts: 130 Major grins
    edited June 30, 2011
    I put your tutorial to use during the recent prom season. Thank you for sharing!

    IMG3217-L.jpg

    IMG3212-L.jpg
    Chris Sowers
  • jirojiro observer Posts: 1,865 Major grins
    edited July 3, 2011
    Little Eyes.
    Mind if I share? Here's my little kid shot with a 50mm f/1.8D nikon lens. Light was coming from the main door at the right inside KFC resto. Aperture was set at f/4.5 at 1/30 second using my Nikon D70. I'm about 2 feet away from him. B&W conversion using LR and Photoshop.

    5819382734_2e5e1963cc_b.jpg
    Sitting quietly, doing nothing. Spring comes and the grass grows by itself.

    http://imagesbyjirobau.blogspot.com/
  • Bryce WilsonBryce Wilson Wants More Glass Posts: 1,584 Major grins
    edited July 4, 2011
    Get Tight
    One thing I have experienced through this "Frame Filler Learning Process" is my brain/eye's difficulty in letting me shoot tight enough. I found it quite difficult to frame the subject tight enough to achieve jeffreaux2's look and feel. For some reason it just went against all the "portraiture" rules I as an old timer had drilled in my head. I guess they are right when they say that it is hard to teach an old dog new tricks.

    What I have found that brings me the results I finally have become happy with is that when I think I'm tight enough, get a little bit tighter.

    This is the first "Frame Filler" that I am completely happy with. Except for the slight softness in eye on the right.

    Love My Teddy
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