any wedding videographers switching to 4k yet? any comments?

sdeweddingssdeweddings TorontoPosts: 8Registered Users Big grins
edited January 19, 2017 in Weddings

yesterday, I had a bride from Toronto asking us to deliver video for her in 4k, her wedding is 2018 so we still have a lot of time to transition.

did anyone else have any experience with this?

i know is not an easy process, first camera then post.

:( is a lot of trouble, but i suppose this is a sign of what it is to come.

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Comments

  • WeiselWeisel Weisel Nashville, TNPosts: 235Registered Users Major grins

    Well, I recently bought a 5D Mk IV, with 4k video. I'm a wedding photographer who is now adding vid to my offerings. Haven't done much for pay work yet, but this thing is amazing.

    Canon 5D MK IV | 24-70 2.8L USM | 50mm F1.4 USM | 70-200mm F2.8L | AB 800 light | 430EXII speedlight (x2) | Lowel iLight | Cybersync remotes | bag of trail mix |
    My Weddings WebsiteBlog
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Posts: 18,825Super Moderators moderator

    Remember to price accordingly. 4k is still a premium format if done properly. Prices should be commensurate with the additional quality.

    4k means different things to different people. Do they require DCI (4096 x 2160) or UHD (3840 x 2160)?

    Are they expecting multiple viewing angles? Will they allow intercuts with FullHD/2k?

    Full wedding coverage? (Long format)

    What are they expecting for deliverables? Disc? HD? Streaming? Highlights on a flash drive?

    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • Cygnus StudiosCygnus Studios Commercial Photographer San Francisco's North BayPosts: 2,142Registered Users Major grins

    @ziggy53 said:
    Remember to price accordingly. 4k is still a premium format if done properly. Prices should be commensurate with the additional quality.

    I thought that 4K was pretty much the norm these days? It's been 3 or 4 years since I've seen anybody use 1080 on a commercial project.

    Steve

    Website | Gear
  • ziggy53ziggy53 Still learnin'still lovin Posts: 18,825Super Moderators moderator

    .> @Cygnus Studios said:

    @ziggy53 said:
    Remember to price accordingly. 4k is still a premium format if done properly. Prices should be commensurate with the additional quality.

    I thought that 4K was pretty much the norm these days? It's been 3 or 4 years since I've seen anybody use 1080 on a commercial project.

    For weddings? I still see a hefty price difference between FullHD and UHD packages being advertised. (Some wedding production houses are still advertising HD packages.)

    I would also discount those production houses shooting with consumer equipment with UHD output but extremely lossy codec acquisition, sub-par lenses, bleached highlights and crushed shadows. The potential of UHD is lost without high production values throughout.

    ziggy53
    Moderator of the Cameras and Accessories forums
  • Cygnus StudiosCygnus Studios Commercial Photographer San Francisco's North BayPosts: 2,142Registered Users Major grins

    My confusion came with "4k is still a premium format" and that didn't make a ton of sense to me as it has been around for a while now. Why should anyone pay extra just for everyday equipment? It's not like anyone has to rent "special" equipment.

    So after I read this yesterday I did some research (I love to learn) and sure enough the majority do charge an extra fee for 4k, but don't say why.

    Then I began to find a few that did, and they stated something along the lines of:

    "Because of the amount of digital information in the 4K format, editing is more complex and time consuming. That means the cost of putting the video together will be higher."

    Now if this is true (I can't say for sure since I know next to nothing about photo editing and absolutely nothing about video editing) and you are spending more time on the project, absolutely you should charge more. Time is money.

    Steve

    Website | Gear
  • kdogkdog artistically challenged San Jose, CAPosts: 11,028Administrators moderator
    edited May 30, 2017

    Just the volume of data will kill you. Canon DSLRs like the 5DMKIV use the motion-JPG recording method for 4K video which generates 4GB of data per minute. That's 240GB of video per hour (or 1/4 Terrabyte). Now multiply that by how many hours of video you're capturing during the day, times how many camera angles you want. Think about that. Are you up for managing multiple Terrabytes for one wedding, with a modest up-charge for 4K? I don't think so.

    And sure, there are DSLRs that have much more efficient 4K compression formats. However, they're so processor intensive that you typically can record only minutes of video at a time without stopping to let the camera cool off. Those won't do the job.

  • JonaBeth RussellJonaBeth Russell Major grins MauiPosts: 551Registered Users Major grins

    Chances are, your best bet will be to use an external recorder & HDD setup to capture so much data. As already pointed out, there will be multiple TB stored.

    We shoot a few weddings per year, and have yet to ever have anyone directly request 4k video. In fact, most viewing devices cannot even display 4k yet, so it's mostly a moot point.

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