Olowalu, Maui

JonaBeth RussellJonaBeth Russell Major grinsMauiPosts: 734Registered Users Major grins

Aloha aerial ohana,

Most people who visit Maui will spend their nights on either the south side or west side of the island.  A few will bunk on the north shore, some will rent a vacation space upcountry (on the side of the volcano), and a very small number of visitors will spend their Maui vacation on the east side of the island, in Hana town.

No matter where people reside during their stay, they inevitably venture out to the 'other side' of the island, and will likely pass through the small community of Olowalu.  By road, it's an unforgettable pass-through, with giant monkey pod trees on either side of the highway forming a canopy overhead.  Driving through feels like you've been transported to a magical forest.  Others will end up in Olowalu by booking various snorkeling and kayaking tours, as it's also home of a 'mother reef'...huge, sprawling out for miles.

However, aside from the pretty parts, Olowalu is rich with cultural and trade history.  In the Hawaiian culture, Olowalu served as a place of sanctuary for people on the lam for an offense against a family or royalty.  Once inside the boundaries of Olowalu, all fighting was off, and violating this sanctuary was punishable by death.  Additionally, Olowalu served as a large agricultural area, known for dry-land taro, breadfruit, sweet potatoes, and other crops raised for material goods such as clothing, shelter, etc.  Later, as sugar farming became a huge industry here, there was a sugar operation in Olowalu.

The small community also served as a trade port from time to time, where western sailors would come to barter & swap goods.  Hawaiians loved the opportunity to acquire things that were completely unavailable to them, such as nails, since there was no smelting technology here.  There was even once a historic massacre that took place in Olowalu, the result of a dispute between Captain Simon Metcalfe and the local islanders over theft of a boat that had been scrapped for materials.

If you spend some time exploring around the area, you're sure to find something fabulous - petroglyphs on lava rocks, abundant reef dwelling sea life, local fruit stands, and some of the best pulled pork around.  Next time you're on Maui, make sure to spend a minute or two in Olowalu!

Today's aerial image was shot from just outside of this community, as I waited for the jammed up traffic to clear.  The gently sloped, forested stretch of land that creates a point into the ocean (middle of the frame) is the location of Olowalu.  You can see the highway disappear into the trees.  In the distant background, you'll find Haleakalā, a 10,000+ft sleeping volcano, towering over the valley between itself and the west mountains.  

The image is a 19 shot pano, manually shot @ 48mm (full zoom) on the M2Z.  Be sure to click the thumbnail to see the full-screen view.  Enjoy!

Comments

  • StumblebumStumblebum I shoot, therefore I am Posts: 7,346Registered Users Major grins

    Fantastic JBR!

  • roaddog52roaddog52 Major grins In the sticks, NE of SeattlePosts: 999Registered Users Major grins

    Taz took the word right out of my mouth. Fantastic!

    I don't know where I'm going, but I'm going anyway.

    Luck happens when preparation meets opportunity!
  • JonaBeth RussellJonaBeth Russell Major grins MauiPosts: 734Registered Users Major grins

    Mahalo fellas!!

  • kdogkdog artistically challenged San Jose, CAPosts: 11,293Administrators moderator
    edited November 1, 2018

    Stunning clarity. You're a master at this stuff.

    19 frames -- wow. How big is the final image? Do you shoot raw when you capture these?

    Between your write-ups and imagery, you could have your own magazine. LOL. I'm sure that thought hasn't escaped you. ;)

    I've surely driven through Olowalu to get to Kaanapali where we've stayed in the past and pretty sure I remember the tunnel of tropical trees. We're going to be out that way in February, and I'll lobby the fam for a stop there to check it out.

  • JonaBeth RussellJonaBeth Russell Major grins MauiPosts: 734Registered Users Major grins

    @kdog said:
    Stunning clarity. You're a master at this stuff.

    19 frames -- wow. How big is the final image? Do you shoot raw when you capture these?

    Between your write-ups and imagery, you could have your own magazine. LOL. I'm sure that thought hasn't escaped you. ;)

    I've surely driven through Olowalu to get to Kaanapali where we've stayed in the past and pretty sure I remember the tunnel of tropical trees. We're going to be out that way in February, and I'll lobby the fam for a stop there to check it out.

    That's very kind of you to say, thank for that! It would be a riot to have a magazine, that's for sure. But I'm pretty confident I'd only be good at the photo & write up stuff. Everything else...printing, selling, etc, would definitely need to be staffed. I have a history of developing a case of the 'give-a-f***s' when it comes to work about which I'm not too passionate! :D

    The final image, after cropping, is 11,745 x 5,988 pixels. I shoot these in RAW most of the time.

    Definitely stop in there and poke around on your next visit. And while you're on island, hit me up! I'd love to connect, even if briefly over coffee or a beer.

  • kdogkdog artistically challenged San Jose, CAPosts: 11,293Administrators moderator

    Haha, you're like me. Motivation is everything. You should at least shop your work around to existing magazines and marketing companies if you don't already do so. I'd love to hook up. I'll PM you.

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