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wild animals

lynnmalynnma Registered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 5,208 Major grins
edited April 3, 2004 in Wildlife
I'm practising with my 300mm lens.. I'm having a little trouble getting it crisp..
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    ruttrutt Registered Users Posts: 6,511 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    lynnma wrote:
    I'm practising with my 300mm lens.. I'm having a little trouble getting it crisp..
    His tail is blurred, presumably because he twitched it (they do that.) This is a long lens and even longer on a 300D. If the shutter was too slow to freeze the tail, it probably was too slow to handhold.
    If not now, when?
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    lynnmalynnma Registered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 5,208 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    rutt wrote:
    His tail is blurred, presumably because he twitched it (they do that.) This is a long lens and even longer on a 300D. If the shutter was too slow to freeze the tail, it probably was too slow to handhold.
    Well, here was my experiment. I used a tripod (through my glass doors) Full out 300mm - time value 400 ISO 400 apature went to 5.6 compensation +2/3 white bal I put on cloudy. And then I had to expose it more (about one stop) in ps.
    Whaddya think.
    Lynn
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    ruttrutt Registered Users Posts: 6,511 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    lynnma wrote:
    Well, here was my experiment. I used a tripod (through my glass doors) Full out 300mm - time value 400 ISO 400 apature went to 5.6 compensation +2/3 white bal I put on cloudy. And then I had to expose it more (about one stop) in ps.
    Whaddya think.
    Lynn
    I think he can move very fast because his tail is blurred.
    If not now, when?
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    lynnmalynnma Registered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 5,208 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    rutt wrote:
    I think he can move very fast because his tail is blurred.
    Apart from his blurred tail, what do you think of the settings... as I have not clue as to what I'm doing but trying very hard to make this lens work, I'm seriously thinking of selling it and buy a different lens with IS.. but hey, as Shay says, "Don't blame the camera, it's only doing what you make it do." So I figured Canon knows a heck of a lot more about photography than I do so I'm trying to master it.
    Thanks for your help so far...
    Lynneek7.gif
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    ruttrutt Registered Users Posts: 6,511 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    lynnma wrote:
    Apart from his blurred tail, what do you think of the settings... as I have not clue as to what I'm doing but trying very hard to make this lens work, I'm seriously thinking of selling it and buy a different lens with IS.. but hey, as Shay says, "Don't blame the camera, it's only doing what you make it do." So I figured Canon knows a heck of a lot more about photography than I do so I'm trying to master it.
    Thanks for your help so far...
    Lynneek7.gif
    The blurred tail is a clue that the squirrel can move fast enough to blur the image at whatever shutter speed you were using. How could he have done that and kept his head still enough to make a sharp image at the same time? Since the camera was on a tripod and the speed was 1/400, I'd say that camera shake wasn't the problem. It's more likely that you needed to treat this subject like an action shot: go for the fastest exposure possible under the conditions.
    If not now, when?
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    lynnmalynnma Registered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 5,208 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    rutt wrote:
    The blurred tail is a clue that the squirrel can move fast enough to blur the image at whatever shutter speed you were using. How could he have done that and kept his head still enough to make a sharp image at the same time? Since the camera was on a tripod and the speed was 1/400, I'd say that camera shake wasn't the problem. It's more likely that you needed to treat this subject like an action shot: go for the fastest exposure possible under the conditions.
    Thanks Rutt.. what would you have gone for on a gray flat late morning... just to get me started on some kind of thought process...:D
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    pathfinderpathfinder Super Moderators Posts: 14,698 moderator
    edited March 30, 2004
    rutt wrote:
    The blurred tail is a clue that the squirrel can move fast enough to blur the image at whatever shutter speed you were using. How could he have done that and kept his head still enough to make a sharp image at the same time? Since the camera was on a tripod and the speed was 1/400, I'd say that camera shake wasn't the problem. It's more likely that you needed to treat this subject like an action shot: go for the fastest exposure possible under the conditions.
    For a 300mm plus telephoto( 300mm x 1.6 mag for hte 300 D Rebel), I would prefer to use 1/1000 sec a a preferred minimum shutter speed. Granted you might not get your preference, but that is where I would start if I wanted crisp images.

    I think that is a 70-300 IS lens is it not, Lynn?

    Here is another tan colored critter captured with a 70-200 zoom....

    2848981-L.jpg
    Pathfinder - www.pathfinder.smugmug.com

    Moderator of the Technique Forum and Finishing School on Dgrin
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    lynnmalynnma Registered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 5,208 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    pathfinder wrote:
    For a 300mm plus telephoto( 300mm x 1.6 mag for hte 300 D Rebel), I would prefer to use 1/1000 sec a a preferred minimum shutter speed. Granted you might not get your preference, but that is where I would start if I wanted crisp images.

    I think that is a 70-300 IS lens is it not, Lynn?

    Here is another tan colored critter captured with a 70-200 zoom....

    2848981-L.jpg
    oooooohhhhh THATS WHAT I WANT!!!! Yes it's a 75-300 EF but it's not an IS.
    I have no clue where to start with it but will certainly start with your suggestion. Thanks Pathfinder. What settings was the wally at? clap.gif
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    ruttrutt Registered Users Posts: 6,511 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    lynnma wrote:
    oooooohhhhh THATS WHAT I WANT!!!! Yes it's a 75-300 EF but it's not an IS.
    I have no clue where to start with it but will certainly start with your suggestion. Thanks Pathfinder. What settings was the wally at? clap.gif
    See you have to use your camera's meter in order to get the exposure right for any particular light (or you have to be able to do it by eye which taks more experience.) So set shutter priority (TV). Then you can set the shutter speed and the camera will set the aperature according to the light (or tell you it cannot.)
    If not now, when?
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    lynnmalynnma Registered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 5,208 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    rutt wrote:
    See you have to use your camera's meter in order to get the exposure right for any particular light (or you have to be able to do it by eye which taks more experience.) So set shutter priority (TV). Then you can set the shutter speed and the camera will set the aperature according to the light (or tell you it cannot.)
    I can't wait!!!! I must go and do it NOW!!!
    thanks..I'm off to find a squirrel..:D
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    pathfinderpathfinder Super Moderators Posts: 14,698 moderator
    edited March 30, 2004
    rutt wrote:
    See you have to use your camera's meter in order to get the exposure right for any particular light (or you have to be able to do it by eye which taks more experience.) So set shutter priority (TV). Then you can set the shutter speed and the camera will set the aperature according to the light (or tell you it cannot.)
    I am going to be a trouble maker her, Rutt Wicked.gif, but I usually shoot in aperature preferred, because depth of field-or lack of it to blur backgrounds is very important to me - BUT LYNN - IF YOU DO THIS for wildlife shots you MUST monitor the shutter speed displayed in your viewfinder real time continuosly as you work.

    Rutt, please - don't be offended by my intrusion - If I wasshooting action sports where DOF was less of a concern, like you I would shoot shutter preferred.

    Here is another deer.....

    2848979-L.jpg
    Pathfinder - www.pathfinder.smugmug.com

    Moderator of the Technique Forum and Finishing School on Dgrin
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    ruttrutt Registered Users Posts: 6,511 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    pathfinder wrote:
    Rutt, please - don't be offended by my intrusion - If I wasshooting action sports where DOF was less of a concern, like you I would shoot shutter preferred.
    I actually do what you do, but I was trying to keep it simple since that's what Lynn wanted.
    If not now, when?
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    lynnmalynnma Registered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 5,208 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    pathfinder wrote:
    I am going to be a trouble maker her, Rutt Wicked.gif, but I usually shoot in aperature preferred, because depth of field-or lack of it to blur backgrounds is very important to me - BUT LYNN - IF YOU DO THIS for wildlife shots you MUST monitor the shutter speed displayed in your viewfinder real time continuosly as you work.

    Rutt, please - don't be offended by my intrusion - If I wasshooting action sports where DOF was less of a concern, like you I would shoot shutter preferred.

    Here is another deer.....

    2848979-L.jpg
    OOOOhhhh again!!!!! beautiful beautiful.... I can do both, either shutter or ap
    I'll learn... thanks.:D
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    lynnmalynnma Registered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 5,208 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    rutt wrote:
    I actually do what you do, but I was trying to keep it simple since that's what Lynn wanted.
    Ok guys... thanks for all so far and I'm getting on well here... so... what apature would you have gone for on a grayish day for crisp crisp... I spose the answer is as small as poss but then shutter speed would be slow... help!!! tell me what to start with and I'll flounder from there...:D
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    pathfinderpathfinder Super Moderators Posts: 14,698 moderator
    edited March 30, 2004
    rutt wrote:
    I actually do what you do, but I was trying to keep it simple since that's what Lynn wanted.

    I suspected as much!Laughing.gif
    Pathfinder - www.pathfinder.smugmug.com

    Moderator of the Technique Forum and Finishing School on Dgrin
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    pathfinderpathfinder Super Moderators Posts: 14,698 moderator
    edited March 30, 2004
    lynnma wrote:
    Ok guys... thanks for all so far and I'm getting on well here... so... what apature would you have gone for on a grayish day for crisp crisp... I spose the answer is as small as poss but then shutter speed would be slow... help!!! tell me what to start with and I'll flounder from there...:D
    If you want shallow depth of field open up all the way - but be aware that some lenses are better than others when you shoot at their maximum aperature. For BEST sharpness I would shoot about two f-stops smaller than the maximum aperature eg if your lens is f2.8 wide open, I would shoot at f5.6 or so unless I wanted shallower depth fo field. With your 70-300 its maximum aperature is probably around f5.6 wide open --- Might try f8 then lickout.gif F11 will give more depth of field.
    Pathfinder - www.pathfinder.smugmug.com

    Moderator of the Technique Forum and Finishing School on Dgrin
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    SavannahManSavannahMan Registered Users Posts: 142 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    Evil Chipmunk
    You guys let me know if I get annoying with my P&S pix. Us beginning beginners can only try... bowdown.gif
    2456398-M.jpg
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    lynnmalynnma Registered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 5,208 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    You guys let me know if I get annoying with my P&S pix. Us beginning beginners can only try... bowdown.gif
    2456398-M.jpg
    thats lovely Savannah, whats he doing? building a house? no, don't worry about being annoying, post away... now I'M ANNOYING :D
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    lynnmalynnma Registered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 5,208 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    pathfinder wrote:
    If you want shallow depth of field open up all the way - but be aware that some lenses are better than others when you shoot at their maximum aperature. For BEST sharpness I would shoot about two f-stops smaller than the maximum aperature eg if your lens is f2.8 wide open, I would shoot at f5.6 or so unless I wanted shallower depth fo field. With your 70-300 its maximum aperature is probably around f5.6 wide open --- Might try f8 then lickout.gif F11 will give more depth of field.
    Manual
    Tv( Shutter Speed )
    1/1250
    Av( Aperture Value )
    7.1
    Metering Mode
    Center-weighted averaging
    ISO Speed
    400
    Lens
    75.0 - 300.0mm
    Focal Length
    300.0mm
    squirrel.. same one, comes back to pose...any better??? or is that blurred....
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    pathfinderpathfinder Super Moderators Posts: 14,698 moderator
    edited March 30, 2004
    You guys let me know if I get annoying with my P&S pix. Us beginning beginners can only try... bowdown.gif
    2456398-M.jpg

    Awwwwhhhh Come on Savannahman.... I actually think your cute squirrel image has nice potential - You might crop the right and left borders a little but your camera is plenty capable of taking very nice pictures - I am sure you saw the picture I posted of a flower I shot with a CoolPix that is about 3 years old - not a fancy new SLR....


    3161369-M.jpg
    Pathfinder - www.pathfinder.smugmug.com

    Moderator of the Technique Forum and Finishing School on Dgrin
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    lynnmalynnma Registered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 5,208 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    pathfinder wrote:
    Awwwwhhhh Come on Savannahman.... I actually think your cute squirrel image has nice potential - You might crop the right and left borders a little but your camera is plenty capable of taking very nice pictures - I am sure you saw the picture I posted of a flower I shot with a CoolPix that is about 3 years old - not a fancy new SLR....


    3161369-M.jpg
    beautiful, looks like silk, so delicate... lovely shot...
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    fishfish Registered Users Posts: 2,950 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    I may have posted this guy
    before, but...
    2578002-L.jpg

    Aperture: f/4.0 ISO: 400 Focal Length: 200mm (guess: 466mm in 35mm) Exposure Time: 0.0012s (1/800)

    2577994-L.jpg
    Aperture: f/4.0 ISO: 400 Focal Length: 200mm (guess: 518mm in 35mm) Exposure Time: 0.0005s (1/2000)
    "Consulting the rules of composition before taking a photograph, is like consulting the laws of gravity before going for a walk." - Edward Weston
    "The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over."-Hunter S.Thompson
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    lynnmalynnma Registered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 5,208 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    fish wrote:
    I may have posted this guy
    before, but...
    2578002-L.jpg

    Aperture: f/4.0 ISO: 400 Focal Length: 200mm (guess: 466mm in 35mm) Exposure Time: 0.0012s (1/800)

    2577994-L.jpg
    Aperture: f/4.0 ISO: 400 Focal Length: 200mm (guess: 518mm in 35mm) Exposure Time: 0.0005s (1/2000)
    now I'm totally confused.... how can both be right FISH!!!
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    SavannahManSavannahMan Registered Users Posts: 142 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    pathfinder wrote:
    Awwwwhhhh Come on Savannahman.... I actually think your cute squirrel image has nice potential - You might crop the right and left borders a little but your camera is plenty capable of taking very nice pictures - I am sure you saw the picture I posted of a flower I shot with a CoolPix that is about 3 years old - not a fancy new SLR....


    3161369-M.jpg
    Okay, cropped it a little. Wow, that shot is amazing! I know you can do great things with a little camera, but I'm totally new to everything other than pointing and shooting. I'm hell-bent on learning though, and thank heavens for you folks. All criticism appreciated. Going to get the available lenses for the DX6440 I just bought, figured if I take well I'll blow the wad on a real camera next year, if not I'll just :hang. You all just keep talking amongst yourselves, I'll be lurking in the shadows taking notes......:lift
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    SavannahManSavannahMan Registered Users Posts: 142 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    lynnma wrote:
    thats lovely Savannah, whats he doing? building a house? no, don't worry about being annoying, post away... now I'M ANNOYING :D
    Ran into him in Yellowstone, he was begging for energy bars. They say don't feed the animals because they become aggressive towards people. I keep watching the news for word of a chipmunk mauling.......
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    SamSam Registered Users Posts: 7,419 Major grins
    edited March 30, 2004
    lynnma wrote:
    Manual
    Tv( Shutter Speed )
    1/1250
    Av( Aperture Value )
    7.1
    Metering Mode
    Center-weighted averaging
    ISO Speed
    400
    Lens
    75.0 - 300.0mm
    Focal Length
    300.0mm
    squirrel.. same one, comes back to pose...any better??? or is that blurred....
    I think it's a very good shot. I have a 70 to 300 I haven't had time to play with yet, but if I can get one like this. I'll be happy.
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    fishfish Registered Users Posts: 2,950 Major grins
    edited March 31, 2004
    lynnma wrote:
    now I'm totally confused.... how can both be right FISH!!!
    Funny how that works, huh? The difference is lighting by a stop or two. Exposure is a dynamic thing...you need to meter or bracket (depending on how anal you are) every shot. Or, just shoot a whole bunch and pick the ones you like the most. I rarely throw away a shot because of exposure. Usually it's because of composition, focus, or boredom. :)
    "Consulting the rules of composition before taking a photograph, is like consulting the laws of gravity before going for a walk." - Edward Weston
    "The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over."-Hunter S.Thompson
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    lynnmalynnma Registered Users, Retired Mod Posts: 5,208 Major grins
    edited March 31, 2004
    fish wrote:
    Funny how that works, huh? The difference is lighting by a stop or two. Exposure is a dynamic thing...you need to meter or bracket (depending on how anal you are) every shot. Or, just shoot a whole bunch and pick the ones you like the most. I rarely throw away a shot because of exposure. Usually it's because of composition, focus, or boredom. :)
    Yeah.. bracketing... must do that more. I usually take a shot about ten different ways on 10 different settings about 10 times but I'm not anal about it...:D
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    wxwaxwxwax Registered Users Posts: 15,471 Major grins
    edited March 31, 2004
    Using a tripod helps. I settle on a composition, then bracket like crazy, then move on to another view. I always check the histogram, make sure I'm not too far to the left or the right (although sometimes that's unavoidable in high contrast situations when you know you're going to do some digital blending and you plan to discard the excessively bright or dark parts of the image.)
    Sid.
    Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabis, ad caput tuum saxum immane mittam
    http://www.mcneel.com/users/jb/foghorn/ill_shut_up.au
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    WingsWings Registered Users Posts: 54 Big grins
    edited April 1, 2004
    Bighorn sheep
    2476684-M.jpg
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