Sensor cleaning

fishfish Site MegalodonPosts: 2,950Registered Users Major grins
edited June 19, 2008 in Accessories
I blew out the sensor on my 20D yesterday before going on a shoot and thought I had gotten out all the dust, but andy found a couple of specs on one of my images.

So the question is...if the dots show up in the upper left of an image, where on the sensor are those located? Intuitively, I would think the upper right of the sensor, while looking in the lens mount. But, are images upside down and/or reversed? Just want to know where to look for the offenders.

Confused in the valley,
fish
"Consulting the rules of composition before taking a photograph, is like consulting the laws of gravity before going for a walk." - Edward Weston
"The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over."-Hunter S.Thompson
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Comments

  • patch29patch29 C|34N3R Atlanta, GAPosts: 2,928Registered Users, Retired Mod Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    fish wrote:
    I blew out the sensor on my 20D yesterday before going on a shoot and thought I had gotten out all the dust, but andy found a couple of specs on one of my images.

    So the question is...if the dots show up in the upper left of an image, where on the sensor are those located? Intuitively, I would think the upper right of the sensor, while looking in the lens mount. But, are images upside down and/or reversed? Just want to know where to look for the offenders.

    Confused in the valley,
    fish

    If you could look through the back of the camera/sensor your image would be upside down and flipped horizontally. Imagine in photoshop the image is correct, though the back of the camera you would just do a 180 deg rotate.

    I would think the dust in your case would be in the lower left of the sensor as you look into the front of the camera.
  • wxwaxwxwax Immoderator Posts: 15,471Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    FWIW, my experience is that using a blower just rearranges the dust. I've tried many times, including with the addition of a hand-held vacuum cleaner. I've since concluded that the sensor itself has to be wiped down. I've used the dry brush method once, and it seemed to work.
    Sid.
    Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabis, ad caput tuum saxum immane mittam
    http://www.mcneel.com/users/jb/foghorn/ill_shut_up.au
  • AndyAndy Bicameral New YorkPosts: 50,151Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    copperhill for me ...
    www.pbase.com/copperhill

    oh and fish, i have the same trouble feeding letterhead or photo paper into a printer headscratch.gif lol3.gif
  • marlinspikemarlinspike Major grins Posts: 2,095Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    Copperhill method is the best. Nuf said.
    Richard
  • dkappdkapp Custon Title :) Posts: 985Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    Has anyone tried the sensor brush?

    I've read good things so far.

    Some reading Material
    Luminous Landscape Review
    Product Homepage
    Rob Galbraith Review.

    The price has kept me away so far.

    Dave
  • fishfish Site Megalodon Posts: 2,950Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    oh geez...it may just be easier to keep cloning them out of sky shots. This is fugly.


    15332026-L.jpg


    I guess that's just one of the perils of swapping lenses. :cry
    "Consulting the rules of composition before taking a photograph, is like consulting the laws of gravity before going for a walk." - Edward Weston
    "The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over."-Hunter S.Thompson
  • AndyAndy Bicameral New YorkPosts: 50,151Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    fish wrote:
    oh geez...it may just be easier to keep cloning them out of sky shots. This is fugly.



    I guess that's just one of the perils of swapping lenses. :cry

    i agree with waxilodeon, the blower blows. get some eclipse, and a spatula and wipes from copperhill, and do it proper. usually one or two swipes is all it takes.

    and no more fugly!
  • ShebaJoShebaJo Major grins Posts: 179Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    Andy wrote:
    i agree with waxilodeon, the blower blows. get some eclipse, and a spatula and wipes from copperhill, and do it proper. usually one or two swipes is all it takes.

    and no more fugly!
    :D another dumb question...is the sensor (22.5 x 15.0mm) on the 20D? I just went to the eclipse site...need to know which sensor size to order 14, 16 or 18mm
    thanks
  • fishfish Site Megalodon Posts: 2,950Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    Andy wrote:
    i agree with waxilodeon, the blower blows. get some eclipse, and a spatula and wipes from copperhill, and do it proper. usually one or two swipes is all it takes.

    and no more fugly!

    I just turned the body upside down, gave it a big honkin' blowjob with the Giotto rocket, snapped a sky shot, and boom! All the spots are still there. umph.gif

    Another solution is to not shoot sky at f29. lol3.gif

    I read a bunch of reviews on the Sensor Brush...sounds like a miracle. But $90 USD for two paint brushes?!
    "Consulting the rules of composition before taking a photograph, is like consulting the laws of gravity before going for a walk." - Edward Weston
    "The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over."-Hunter S.Thompson
  • John MuellerJohn Mueller Long Shots Posts: 2,555Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    dkapp wrote:
    Has anyone tried the sensor brush?

    I've read good things so far.

    Some reading Material
    Luminous Landscape Review
    Product Homepage
    Rob Galbraith Review.

    The price has kept me away so far.

    Dave
    The sensor brush is the only thing that touches my sensor.
    Yeah its pricey,but it will last a long time.I been through swab method,bolwing etc.The brush WINS hands down.
    If it gets junk on it that the brush wont pull off,then yeah a wet method.I clean it every 2 weeks or so and havent needed to do that.
  • fishfish Site Megalodon Posts: 2,950Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    MHJS wrote:
    The sensor brush is the only thing that touches my sensor.
    Yeah its pricey,but it will last a long time.I been through swab method,bolwing etc.The brush WINS hands down.
    If it gets junk on it that the brush wont pull off,then yeah a wet method.I clean it every 2 weeks or so and havent needed to do that.
    ordered. :uhoh
    "Consulting the rules of composition before taking a photograph, is like consulting the laws of gravity before going for a walk." - Edward Weston
    "The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over."-Hunter S.Thompson
  • digismiledigismile Major grins Posts: 955Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    I like the copperhill method for two reasons:

    1) It has done a perfect job so far for me on the sensor cleaning part.
    2) You can use the same pads & fluid on your lenses. I have been way happier with the Pekpads & Eclipse for cleaning my glass. Not sure what's different about the Pads (or the Eclipse for that matter), but cleaning has been noticably better than the standard stuff sold in my local photo stores.

    I hadn't even heard about the Sensor Brush until I saw a local news report! It turns out I work just a few blocks away from them. It is a little pricey, but when you consider how much a lot of us have invested in our gear, I don't think it's a lot to pay ...

    That being said, I already have a method that is working just fine, so no need to change.

    My 2 cents.

    Brad
  • AndyAndy Bicameral New YorkPosts: 50,151Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    fish wrote:
    ordered. :uhoh

    you spend money like a sailor just in port after six months at sea lol3.gif


    ... said the pot to the kettle ....
  • gusgus Major grins Posts: 16,209Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    What do you lot recon your shirt is for ?
  • John MuellerJohn Mueller Long Shots Posts: 2,555Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    Humungus wrote:
    What do you lot recon your shirt is for ?

    rolleyes1.gifroflrolleyes1.gif
  • wxwaxwxwax Immoderator Posts: 15,471Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    dkapp wrote:
    Has anyone tried the sensor brush?

    I've read good things so far.

    Some reading Material
    Luminous Landscape Review
    Product Homepage
    Rob Galbraith Review.

    The price has kept me away so far.

    Dave

    Yup. Worked fine for me.
    Sid.
    Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabis, ad caput tuum saxum immane mittam
    http://www.mcneel.com/users/jb/foghorn/ill_shut_up.au
  • fishfish Site Megalodon Posts: 2,950Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    Andy wrote:
    ... said the pot to the kettle ....
    since you've been jomommatized, that would be "PKB".
    "Consulting the rules of composition before taking a photograph, is like consulting the laws of gravity before going for a walk." - Edward Weston
    "The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over."-Hunter S.Thompson
  • fishfish Site Megalodon Posts: 2,950Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    wxwax wrote:
    Yup. Worked fine for me.

    you bought one? worked good, huh? there's just something that gives me shivers when i think about using liquid and swabs on a cmos sensor. of course, if it doesn't work, then I can blame you and the nikon deadbeat. rolleyes1.gif
    "Consulting the rules of composition before taking a photograph, is like consulting the laws of gravity before going for a walk." - Edward Weston
    "The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over."-Hunter S.Thompson
  • fishfish Site Megalodon Posts: 2,950Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    Humungus wrote:
    What do you lot recon your shirt is for ?
    keeping bbq sauce off my belly? ne_nau.gif
    "Consulting the rules of composition before taking a photograph, is like consulting the laws of gravity before going for a walk." - Edward Weston
    "The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over."-Hunter S.Thompson
  • wxwaxwxwax Immoderator Posts: 15,471Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    fish wrote:
    you bought one? worked good, huh? there's just something that gives me shivers when i think about using liquid and swabs on a cmos sensor. of course, if it doesn't work, then I can blame you and the nikon deadbeat. rolleyes1.gif
    No, no, when I say dry brush, I actually mean dry brush. naughty.gif
    Sid.
    Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabis, ad caput tuum saxum immane mittam
    http://www.mcneel.com/users/jb/foghorn/ill_shut_up.au
  • MitchellMitchell Major grins Posts: 3,500Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    fish wrote:
    you bought one? worked good, huh? there's just something that gives me shivers when i think about using liquid and swabs on a cmos sensor. of course, if it doesn't work, then I can blame you and the nikon deadbeat. rolleyes1.gif
    It took a lot of nerve and a steady hand, but the Copperhill method worked for me. Blowers and brushes are probably not the way to go. Just get up your nerve and do it the right way.

    mitch
  • wxwaxwxwax Immoderator Posts: 15,471Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 4, 2005
    Mitchell wrote:
    brushes are probably not the way to go.
    Why? ear.gif
    Sid.
    Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabis, ad caput tuum saxum immane mittam
    http://www.mcneel.com/users/jb/foghorn/ill_shut_up.au
  • ian408ian408 More wag. Less Bark. Posts: 21,303Administrators moderator
    edited February 5, 2005
    fish wrote:
    you bought one? worked good, huh? there's just something that gives me shivers when i think about using liquid and swabs on a cmos sensor. of course, if it doesn't work, then I can blame you and the nikon deadbeat. rolleyes1.gif
    You can mitigate the dust by turning the camera off before you swap
    the lens. Something about ESD.

    Ian
    Moderator Journeys/Sports/Big Picture :: Need some help with dgrin?
  • wxwaxwxwax Immoderator Posts: 15,471Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 5, 2005
    ian408 wrote:
    You can mitigate the dust by turning the camera off before you swap
    the lens. Something about ESD.

    Ian
    nod.gif I think it basically turns the sensor into a dust magnet.
    Sid.
    Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabis, ad caput tuum saxum immane mittam
    http://www.mcneel.com/users/jb/foghorn/ill_shut_up.au
  • AndyAndy Bicameral New YorkPosts: 50,151Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 5, 2005
    the important thing ...
    Mitchell wrote:
    It took a lot of nerve and a steady hand, but the Copperhill method worked for me. Blowers and brushes are probably not the way to go. Just get up your nerve and do it the right way.

    mitch

    is to use one of the methods. sensorbrush has a fine following... i've not tried it, only because i started with copperhill... i've heard good things about sensor brush though.
  • lynnmalynnma Moddess Emeritus Homosassa, Florida (Paradise)Posts: 5,163Registered Users, Retired Mod
    edited February 5, 2005
    Andy wrote:
    is to use one of the methods. sensorbrush has a fine following... i've not tried it, only because i started with copperhill... i've heard good things about sensor brush though.
    Ever since I received my eclipse and enough swabs to last life time all my dust motts have dissapeared.. works great.. just leave it on the shelf and poof.. no more motts.. maybe it was the lenses.. which are now gone..headscratch.gif
  • DoctorItDoctorIt vrooom! Posts: 11,940Administrators moderator
    edited February 5, 2005
    wxwax wrote:
    nod.gif I think it basically turns the sensor into a dust magnet.
    indeed. and actually, in an ideal situation, you should give it a second to discharge after shutting it off. I know the Drebel actually shots off when you disconnect the lens, would imagine most dslr's do, but still, its a charged sensor, and those electrons do take a split second to all depart.
    Erik
    moderator of: The Flea Market [ guidelines ]

  • marlinspikemarlinspike Major grins Posts: 2,095Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 5, 2005
    Something about the copperhill method. Be careful. I was a bit, er, heavy handed, and I managed to bend down the metal frame that's around the CMOS on my drebel on the left side. It didn't do anything to the pictures, but you know, still, it kinda sucks that it bent down.
    Richard
  • ian408ian408 More wag. Less Bark. Posts: 21,303Administrators moderator
    edited February 5, 2005
    Something else. While it's important to take great care when working
    inside the camera you should also know that the CMOS sensor is not
    totally unprotected it does have a thin glass layer over it. You do need
    to be careful with the amount of fluid on the swab--don't get it all
    over the inside of the camera--that will be bad.

    When you're using the rocket to blow the dust out. Turn the camera
    off. Raise the mirror (if needed) and face the camera down at >45
    degree angle and blow--don't stick the tip of the rocket inside the
    body.

    So far, I haven't had to clean the sensor except using the rocket
    blower.

    Ian
    Moderator Journeys/Sports/Big Picture :: Need some help with dgrin?
  • fishfish Site Megalodon Posts: 2,950Registered Users Major grins
    edited February 5, 2005
    ian408 wrote:
    So far, I haven't had to clean the sensor except using the rocket
    blower.

    Ian

    Same here, so far. Do me a favor, please? Go shoot the sky at your smallest aperture, process with autolevels and lets see the result. Don't blow off your sensor first. Just curious...
    "Consulting the rules of composition before taking a photograph, is like consulting the laws of gravity before going for a walk." - Edward Weston
    "The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over."-Hunter S.Thompson
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